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There's still women who don't know based on signs in bathrooms...


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But I wonder (aside from accidents) why the "no feminine products in toilet" signs are necessary?

 

Like, there are probably women who weren't taught it but if they read the sign in the public bathrooms, then shouldn't they at least know, for that bathroom, not to do it.

 

Right?

 

Are the signs just proactive?

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Not sure what you're asking? They are necessary because most bathrooms are not 'no feminine products'. Having to put a tampon in a trash can is not the default!

What do you mean "it's not the default?"  I'd say that most plumbing systems are not capable of handling feminine products.  It is rare that they can.  And when they are flushed, someone else down the line has to take care of it ... like cleaning out a sewer back up ... like the water treatment plant that has to filter those out. 

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Not sure what you're asking? They are necessary because most bathrooms are not 'no feminine products'. Having to put a tampon in a trash can is not the default!

Yes, the trash can is ALWAYS the default.  You never put products in the plumbing system, not if you value your plumbing!

 

Plumbers call them "sewer rats" and make a lot of money from people who do not know how to treat their plumbing.  Trash can near the toilet, always.  Wrap it in paper. 

It is in all my Leases too, that only the waste and the paper goes into the toilet because there are people who simply don't know this basic fact of plumbing. 

Edited by TranquilMind
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What do you mean "it's not the default?"  I'd say that most plumbing systems are not capable of handling feminine products.  It is rare that they can.  And when they are flushed, someone else down the line has to take care of it ... like cleaning out a sewer back up ... like the water treatment plant that has to filter those out. 

 

Yeah, :confused1:  - I've never heard of a toilet where it's okay to flush pads or tampons...

 

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Yeah, :confused1: - I've never heard of a toilet where it's okay to flush pads or tampons...

 

Many tampons advertise that the *applicator* is flushable and you don't think women flush the little cotton tampons?

 

I personally use a diva cup!

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I grew up not knowing.  Not knowing anything about septic systems, I thought the signs in bathrooms meant pad and tampon applicators, which of course I knew not to flush. It never occurred to me that they meant the cotton inserts inside the tampon, too - I thought they were made to desinagrate in toilette systems.  I did not realize until and adult, and my sister had a house with a septic system, that these were a no-no.  I think signs need to spell it out more completely.

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Not sure what you're asking? They are necessary because most bathrooms are not 'no feminine products'. Having to put a tampon in a trash can is not the default!

 

You've actually got that backwards. Tampons don't biodegrade easily, and thus should never enter either a septic system or a municipal sewer system. If you doubt this, I have just one word for you: "Fatberg".

 

The only things that should be flushed down the drain are bodily waste and toilet paper.

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Many tampons advertise that the *applicator* is flushable and you don't think women flush the little cotton tampons?

 

I personally use a diva cup!

Just because the tampon makers say it is safe does not mean that those who take care of plumbing/sewers/septic systems agree. 

 

I agree with the OP. I can't believe there are still women who don't know that they only things that toilet are designed to dispose of is TP and bodily waste.

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What do you mean "it's not the default?" I'd say that most plumbing systems are not capable of handling feminine products. It is rare that they can. And when they are flushed, someone else down the line has to take care of it ... like cleaning out a sewer back up ... like the water treatment plant that has to filter those out.

Right. And it's been my understanding that eventually, things like tampons need to be cleaned out of the treatment plant filters and taken to landfills anyway. But in the process just cause more problems all down the line, from the toilets on down.

 

So if they will end up in landfills anyway, shouldn't they go in the garbage from the start?

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Flushing pads is always a no, I think. However, I can think a few places I have been where tampons was a no. Those would be systems that are rural or septic. 

Nope.  Suburban municipal wastewater systems are a no.  Most homes on municipal sewers don't handle it well.  (There is a reason why Roto-rooter exists and it isn't just tree roots.)  The first time I used tampons, I was grossed out by the thought of having to manage putting that in the garbage.  So, I flushed.  Later that day, my dad had to clean out a backed up toilet and my mom gave me a lecture (gee, maybe telling me about the birds and the bees first would have been helpful followed by instructions on feminine products instead of leaving me to learn it on my own would have helped.) 

 

My friend is a chemist for a water reclamation center and on the tours for adults, she makes sure they see the piles and piles of feminine products that have to be filtered from the wastewater before it can be treated.  That has to be put into a landfill. 

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Nope.  Suburban municipal wastewater systems are a no.  Most homes on municipal sewers don't handle it well.  (There is a reason why Roto-rooter exists and it isn't just tree roots.)  The first time I used tampons, I was grossed out by the thought of having to manage putting that in the garbage.  So, I flushed.  Later that day, my dad had to clean out a backed up toilet and my mom gave me a lecture (gee, maybe telling me about the birds and the bees first would have been helpful followed by instructions on feminine products instead of leaving me to learn it on my own would have helped.) 

 

My friend is a chemist for a water reclamation center and on the tours for adults, she makes sure they see the piles and piles of feminine products that have to be filtered from the wastewater before it can be treated.  That has to be put into a landfill. 

 

Never had this problem and I don't know anyone who has. Maybe it's the area I live in. I don't know anyone who's ever had a sewer back up. My sister and i flushed tampons growing up. My parents have been in that house 40 years without a sewer back up. 

 

You'd think this would have been an issue in college dorms, but we were never told not to do this. 

 

I've never seen any PSA from my water company telling us not to do this. You'd think if it were a big problem at the water treatment plant they'd want to educate the public not to do this. 

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Even those flushable baby/moist wipes aren't truly flushable. I had an apartment where both my toilets and the toilets in the apt next to mine completely backed up and the plumbers pulled wads of wipes out. Both my neighbor and I tried to get out of paying for it since neither of us had kids in diapers but nope, we were stuck with the bill for someone else's stupidity.

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Well, I think the OP's question has been answered. I personally would never put a tampon in my hand in order to put it into a waste basket unless instructed to by a sign - or if I knew the place I was at had a rickety old septic system. I thinks many women are the same.

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I guess I need to make a sign in case we have any guests.  I certainly don't want to have an expensive plumbing bill.  Seriously ... read the links posted by Tanaqui. 

 

BTW, I've never put a used tampon into my hand.  I've always caught it in a wad of TP and wrapped it up.  We keep our bathroom garbage can lined with a plastic bag. 

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Even those flushable baby/moist wipes aren't truly flushable. I had an apartment where both my toilets and the toilets in the apt next to mine completely backed up and the plumbers pulled wads of wipes out. Both my neighbor and I tried to get out of paying for it since neither of us had kids in diapers but nope, we were stuck with the bill for someone else's stupidity.

Ugh. And I guess it is the same...flushable tampons are not truly flushable bc they don't break down fast enough.

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I must admit I'm surprised. I thought that pretty much everyone who grew up with plumbing, or had it for a few years knew that no matter what system is used, or how old that system is to never flush anything other then bodily waste and TP. 

 

For those who thing it's fine as long as you aren't on an old systemic system. 

 

http://jezebel.com/time-to-accept-reality-and-stop-flushing-tampons-down-t-1566737300

 

Basically if you flush it down, then you are forcing someone along the line to pick it out and throw it out. 

Edited by Julie Smith
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Well, I think the OP's question has been answered. I personally would never put a tampon in my hand in order to put it into a waste basket unless instructed to by a sign - or if I knew the place I was at had a rickety old septic system. I thinks many women are the same.

 

Note: I quoted poppy because I am having the thoughts in response to her post. However, this is not just directed at her. I'd love to be enlightened by anyone who feels as she does.

 

I just don't get this. Many people have told you it (that is, flushing tampons) isn't a good thing to do. Evidence has been provided.

 

I just don't get why, at this point, anyone would continue to do so. 

 

And doesn't the tampon go in your hand (well, the string at least) to get into the toilet? (I don't use them so I am assuming that's the case.) So what's the difference between dropping in into a trash can. Put it in some TP, wrap it up, and throw it away. 

 

I mean, you've been carrying it around inside you, so how in the world can holding it for about 2 seconds wrapped in TP be that big of a deal?

 

 

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I personally would never put a tampon in my hand in order to put it into a waste basket unless instructed to by a sign - or if I knew the place I was at had a rickety old septic system.

 

Don't you need to "put it in your hand" in order to get it out of your body? You don't just push it out like a baby, do you? If so - wow! I'm in genuine awe of your muscles.

 

Seriously ... read the links posted by Tanaqui.

 

Fair warning, viewer discretion is advised for the one on the fatbergs. That's a mental image you'll never wipe.

 

Edited by Tanaqui
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I have always flushed tampons without any issues. Pads, no.

 

Yes, in my mom's house we were taught to flush tampons. I lived there for eight years and never had a problem. There were three females all eight years.

 

Never pads though.

 

I wouldn't flush them in my adult homes. The toilets are "iffy" working at best so I wouldn't put tampons down the homes we live in now. (We've rented two in the past few years.)

 

Alley

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Yes, in my mom's house we were taught to flush tampons. I lived there for eight years and never had a problem. There were three females all eight years.

 

 

Perhaps you never had a problem in your house. But the problem is when those tampons leave your house and make the way to the sewer system. At some point someone has to scoop out your tampon and transport it to the landfill. That is assuming it first didn't get stuck in, or help cause a fatberg. 

Edited by Julie Smith
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I personally disapprove of the tone of a lot of comments here. Seems like some people cannot resist denigrating those with different practices or different levels of knowledge. That is unkind, especially considering the wide variation in training (or lack thereof) we receive from our parents on how to handle our cycles.

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I was taught it's fine to flush a tampon. HOWEVER the confusion comes in because the cardboard applicator is really the part that is described as flushable, not the actual tampon.

 

Tanaqui said

Don't you need to "put it in your hand" in order to get it out of your body? You don't just push it out like a baby, do you? If so - wow! I'm in genuine awe of your muscles.

 

And the part about putting it in your hand--I only put the string in my hand, and that was clean. The bloody part at the end of the string just swung into the toilet while I was sitting there, to be graphic. But you are right, they shouldn't be flushed.

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I will also point out that in addition to not flushing tampons, you shouldn't flush medicine (gets into the water table) or grease down the drain. If you have bacon grease or the like to get rid of, you can either pour it into a paper cup or a can and then dispose of it once it cools, or you can sop it up with a bit of flour and give it to the birds. Or you can save it and cook with it later, that too.

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There was an article about meds found in urban water supplies...from people flushing meds! I used to do that. I got into trouble once (rightly so) for throwing out prescription meds in the trash--the bag broke open in our alley, and the meds were out there for kids to find. So, how ARE they supposed to be disposed of?

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There was an article about meds found in urban water supplies...from people flushing meds! I used to do that. I got into trouble once (rightly so) for throwing out prescription meds in the trash--the bag broke open in our alley, and the meds were out there for kids to find. So, how ARE they supposed to be disposed of?

Our town has designated days throughout the year where you can bring your drugs to a certain location for them to dispose of them properly.

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There was an article about meds found in urban water supplies...from people flushing meds! I used to do that. I got into trouble once (rightly so) for throwing out prescription meds in the trash--the bag broke open in our alley, and the meds were out there for kids to find. So, how ARE they supposed to be disposed of?

Our local health services and police department have a "take back drugs" day. You show up, drop them off, and they do whatever the proper thing to do with them is. 

 

To anyone who may have been offended by the tone of any of my posts in this thread...I am sorry. You should be reading some of them with an incredulous/astounded tone, because I am.

 

I can't believe that people, after being told how harmful tampons are to sewer systems continue to flush them. It doesn't matter if it causes problems for you/your house. The point is that they do cause problems/extra work for the system as a whole.

 

When it is so easy to prevent that, I honestly cannot fathom why people wouldn't do so. That's why I asked for an explanation from those people. 

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There was an article about meds found in urban water supplies...from people flushing meds! I used to do that. I got into trouble once (rightly so) for throwing out prescription meds in the trash--the bag broke open in our alley, and the meds were out there for kids to find. So, how ARE they supposed to be disposed of?

 

If your town doesn't have a safe disposal day, then you're supposed to break up the medicine if possible and mix it in with something unappealing, like kitty litter or coffee grounds. Then the whole mess goes in a separate bag inside the main garbage bag.

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the signs are proactive - while I'm sure some dont' know,  some women simply don't care.  not their plumbing, not their problem.  though I was recently in a restaurant and rather put-out they didn't have a trash receptical in the stall.  if merchants don't want women flushing - they need to provide somewhere to dispose of it.

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There was an article about meds found in urban water supplies...from people flushing meds! I used to do that. I got into trouble once (rightly so) for throwing out prescription meds in the trash--the bag broke open in our alley, and the meds were out there for kids to find. So, how ARE they supposed to be disposed of?

 

Most pharmacies should take unused or expired medications.  At DH's pharmacy, they then have a service that picks up all of the medications that have been dropped off and the service disposes of everything properly.  Ask around at your local pharmacies to see if one or more of them do this.

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There was an article about meds found in urban water supplies...from people flushing meds! I used to do that. I got into trouble once (rightly so) for throwing out prescription meds in the trash--the bag broke open in our alley, and the meds were out there for kids to find. So, how ARE they supposed to be disposed of?

Put them in kitty litter in a bag, wet them, and massage the bag until they are broken down.  Then place closed bag in trash.

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I will also point out that in addition to not flushing tampons, you shouldn't flush medicine (gets into the water table) or grease down the drain. If you have bacon grease or the like to get rid of, you can either pour it into a paper cup or a can and then dispose of it once it cools, or you can sop it up with a bit of flour and give it to the birds. Or you can save it and cook with it later, that too.

We live in the country so I save grease, let it cool and then pour or scoop it out near the edge of the woods.  I imagine the little night animals having a tasty snack.  :)

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Note: I quoted poppy because I am having the thoughts in response to her post. However, this is not just directed at her. I'd love to be enlightened by anyone who feels as she does.

 

I just don't get this. Many people have told you it (that is, flushing tampons) isn't a good thing to do. Evidence has been provided.

 

I just don't get why, at this point, anyone would continue to do so.

 

And doesn't the tampon go in your hand (well, the string at least) to get into the toilet? (I don't use them so I am assuming that's the case.) So what's the difference between dropping in into a trash can. Put it in some TP, wrap it up, and throw it away.

 

I mean, you've been carrying it around inside you, so how in the world can holding it for about 2 seconds wrapped in TP be that big of a deal?

 

 

I do use a diva cup , like I said, so it's mostly a nonissue . When I talked about not touching the tampon I was really thinking about places like malls and the airport..... places where I really don't want to be in contact with that little metal trash bin full of bodily fluids. On the rare days I wear a pad, I typically will wrap it thickly in paper and drop it into the paper towel trash bin. I can't see that happening with a soiled tampon.

 

Having grown up with a septic tank, I learned to be gentle with the plumbing systems of private homes and little restaurants. But big industrial bathrooms or my 7 stall corporate office doesn't elicit the same protectiveness for me.

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 though I was recently in a restaurant and rather put-out they didn't have a trash receptical in the stall.  if merchants don't want women flushing - they need to provide somewhere to dispose of it.

 

Funny story ... dd's climbing team has moved to a brand new gym.  There are 4 men who are the owner/operators.  When they opened, there were several important things missing from the women's restroom, one thing being receptacles for feminine product disposal.  Several of us had to explain to these men what the problem was and why it was important to supply these post-haste.  Well, in the time it took to order these and have them installed, they had a plumbing problem caused by, you guessed it, feminine products being improperly disposed of.  We are still getting after them to get a vending machine for these installed. 

 

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I grew up being taught by the women in my life and by advertising that it was okay to flush the tampons.

 

Getting a nasty attitude toward people who don't know that apparently it's not good for the system isn't so helpful. The only reason I know - seriously - is that this is like the third WTM thread in this vein that I've read. And in most of them, people have been a bit ticked off and incredulous that anyone would be such an ignoramus not to know this. But many of us were told for years and years that it *was* okay. Advertising continues to tell us. For most people, there's never been a reason to re-evaluate that position. I've never had a house plumbing issue arising from tampons and I flushed them for years and years. So educate, don't act like you can't believe we don't know. How often do you re-evaluate long held habits that were taught to you as the right way to do something? And in how many places do people have open conversations about this topic in particular? It's not that weird that people don't know this.

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There was an article about meds found in urban water supplies...from people flushing meds! I used to do that. I got into trouble once (rightly so) for throwing out prescription meds in the trash--the bag broke open in our alley, and the meds were out there for kids to find. So, how ARE they supposed to be disposed of?

Take them to the pharmecy for disposal.

 

Sent from my SM-T530NU using Tapatalk

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I grew up being taught by the women in my life and by advertising that it was okay to flush the tampons.

 

Getting a nasty attitude toward people who don't know that apparently it's not good for the system isn't so helpful. The only reason I know - seriously - is that this is like the third WTM thread in this vein that I've read. And in most of them, people have been a bit ticked off and incredulous that anyone would be such an ignoramus not to know this. But many of us were told for years and years that it *was* okay. Advertising continues to tell us. For most people, there's never been a reason to re-evaluate that position. I've never had a house plumbing issue arising from tampons and I flushed them for years and years. So educate, don't act like you can't believe we don't know. How often do you re-evaluate long held habits that were taught to you as the right way to do something? And in how many places do people have open conversations about this topic in particular? It's not that weird that people don't know this.

 

Well said.

 

I know, the sewage treatment plants are probably gross and messed up here, but I have never seen evidence that tampons hurt the plumbing.   I am not saying they don't hurt the plumbing, I am saying never having seen evidence it's hard to understand you shouldn't be flushing them.  Add the fact that I was told TO flush them, how on EARTH am I just supposed to intuitively figure out you are not supposed to flush allegedly "flushable" tampons? 

 

Many reasonable and intelligent people really do not know they are not supposed to flush tampons.  After flushing them for 25 years, I would honestly forget not to flush them if I still used tampons.  

 

Have some compassion and assume people are uninformed or forgetful.  And yes, you do need to post a sign if you don't want people to flush them.  

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Note: I quoted poppy because I am having the thoughts in response to her post. However, this is not just directed at her. I'd love to be enlightened by anyone who feels as she does.

 

I just don't get this. Many people have told you it (that is, flushing tampons) isn't a good thing to do. Evidence has been provided.

 

I just don't get why, at this point, anyone would continue to do so. 

 

 

 

 

 

I'm not trying to be snarky either, just answering your question honestly.  Why would I continue to do so?  Because I don't necessarily believe something just because people provide online links.  I too grew up flushing tampons, lived under (lol) several city waste management systems, and I've never heard anything directly from any city to NOT do so. If it were such an issue, wouldn't a notice be included in the monthly bill?

 

The only time I stopped was when we went to a septic and I heard horror stories of septic tanks blowing up tampons. 

 

In fact, I still have a septic, and my now adult daughter may flush her tampons occasionally. 

 

I also know that flushing wipes is a Very Bad Thing, and occasionally wipes gets flushed down our septic too.  On the plus side, at least we're the ones that will have to deal with any repurcussions.

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Instead of the signs that are currently in many public bathrooms (and they're not in all of them), maybe someone should start a campaign to make a standard sign that is more comprehensively informative. "Did you know that even the best sewage systems can't handle tampons and other feminine waste products? While they don't always hurt individual homes and businesses, they end up costing money for public works and that cost is passed down to you, the consumer. Don't flush feminine hygiene products!"

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