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Curriculum Ideas to teach Reading at a School

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I hope this post is appropriate here but I don't know where else to ask since homeschooling is our life.

 

My kids and I (along with several other moms and homeschoolers) are volunteering, once a week, at an Indian school to help teach first graders how to read English. It's an English speaking school so I'm not sure I would really classify it as ESL, although many of their students' parents do not speak English. 

 

We have been using Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons with groups of 1-4 students per volunteer. It's a phonics based program and fully scripted so the student volunteers can easily administer.

 

But there is a disconnect between what the school is teaching and our phonics approach. It seems that many of the kids have just memorized words. So after speaking to the school, they received approval from the Indian education board to change their curriculum. 

 

Now we have a meeting with the head of English and the K-1 teachers on Dec 13 to discuss what curriculum to use and how we can work together. Somehow I was elected to lead this! 

 

My kids went to public school until after they were reading. Aside from me reading to and with them, I don't know how to teach reading. I don't know what curriculum works for a classroom setting (and for unlicensed teachers who English is a second language). 

 

This school is at risk for being closed if they cannot raise the reading level of these students. I'm not aware of another option for these kids if the school is closed. They are too cute and lovely to ignore. 

 

I have been researching all over the Internet. I know some of you are certified classroom teachers. I'm hoping you can help: what recommendations would you make for curriculum to teach children to read in a classroom setting? Something not too difficult. Do you recommend a phonics approach or something else? 

 

Thank you, thank you!

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I hope this post is appropriate here but I don't know where else to ask since homeschooling is our life.

 

My kids and I (along with several other moms and homeschoolers) are volunteering, once a week, at an Indian school to help teach first graders how to read English. It's an English speaking school so I'm not sure I would really classify it as ESL, although many of their students' parents do not speak English. 

 

We have been using Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons with groups of 1-4 students per volunteer. It's a phonics based program and fully scripted so the student volunteers can easily administer.

 

But there is a disconnect between what the school is teaching and our phonics approach. It seems that many of the kids have just memorized words. So after speaking to the school, they received approval from the Indian education board to change their curriculum. 

 

Now we have a meeting with the head of English and the K-1 teachers on Dec 13 to discuss what curriculum to use and how we can work together. Somehow I was elected to lead this! 

 

My kids went to public school until after they were reading. Aside from me reading to and with them, I don't know how to teach reading. I don't know what curriculum works for a classroom setting (and for unlicensed teachers who English is a second language). 

 

This school is at risk for being closed if they cannot raise the reading level of these students. I'm not aware of another option for these kids if the school is closed. They are too cute and lovely to ignore. 

 

I have been researching all over the Internet. I know some of you are certified classroom teachers. I'm hoping you can help: what recommendations would you make for curriculum to teach children to read in a classroom setting? Something not too difficult. Do you recommend a phonics approach or something else? 

 

Thank you, thank you!

 

Oh, definitely phonics.

 

My recommendation: Spalding. Spalding is a complete language arts program: reading, spelling, penmanship, basic capitalization and punctuation, simple writing. It's cost effective, as it doesn't use consumable workbooks or photocopying or anything. Teacher training is available but not necessary.

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Academic Success for all Learners has the I See Sam readers and is made for classroom use. It is very easy to implement. Phonics Pathways would also be easy to do with small groups of students or as a class doing choral reading.

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I believe that the REVISED Alphaphonics is the most foolproof curriculum for underprepared teachers to use with average and mildly disabled students.

 

Spalding fascinates me. I use the handwriting. But I cannot recommend it to underprepared teachers. The best is the not the best if the teacher is in over her head.

 

Don Potter's page for Alphaphonics.

http://www.donpotter.net/reading_clinic.html

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If you contact Don Potter, I bet he will correspond with you. Over the years, I have corresponded with him off and on, and he is interested in unique low income and bilingual needs for phonics instruction.

 

I know nothing about this new smaller print book. I'm curious!

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I use Spalding too, but I agree it may be difficult to get all of the teachers and tutors on the same page. If you can get training for the teachers and tutors, my vote is to do that.

 

I'm not sure that any phonics program will be beneficial if the teachers aren't trained in it though. There is so much room in many programs for abuse (eg. just putting the worksheets/books in front of the kids, and leaving out the specific instruction in phonics rules.

 

Also, I don't have experience with it, but what about a program like AAR? 

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I think funnix might work. It is similar to the teach your child to read in 100 easy lessons, but is computerized. One of the creators worked with both programs. It has information on using it in a classroom with small groups. I am a homeschooler though so haven't tried that.... they would need some computers obviously...

 

Sent from my SM-T530NU using Tapatalk

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For anyone who has read Spalding, but found it overwhelming, Ruth Beechick in the 3R's lists the most important phonograms to teach. Over the past years, I have come to more and more agree with her.

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Thank you everyone! You have given me much to look into and think about. I am overwhelmed with this assignment but am dedicated to make it happen. I knew this group of smart homeschoolers would have answers for me. 

 

If anyone has any more suggestions, send them my way!

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I have used First Start Reading from Memoria Press. It can be used in a classroom or by homeschoolers. No teacher training is required. I have to say, it is the one and only program that I have used, but I am well pleased with the progress my twins have made. They started as non-readers only knowing letter sounds. Now I would call them almost fluent readers, only pausing on multi-syllable words. The forum at Memoria Press is a wonderful place to ask any questions, and teachers from Highland Latin School will respond. I think they may be adding or changing some of the phonics books in the program (for first grade), but it will only make it better.

http://forum.memoriapress.com/forumdisplay.php?5-K-8-Curriculum-Board

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I really like the Starfall kindergarten reading curriculum.  It's designed for a classroom, not homeschoolers.  It involves a lot of science and social studies/history.  It's very gentle, but I used it a little with one of my kids, and I think it really gets the job done.  And it's very open-and-go for teachers.

 

I was also really excited that the Superkids reading program has been redeveloped and issued.  I know nothing about it, except it's the program that my district used when I was a kid, and I loved it!  It was my dream to grow up and live on a rainbow school bus :)

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This school may need a multiphase plan. An emergency plan, and then maybe more complex teacher training down the road.

 

I had a disastrous day not too long ago.

 

I was out of food and decided on an ambitious plan to start getting ready for the holidays. It had never occurred to me that I might 100% fail at the ambitious plan. But I did. :lol: I still haven't converted this story from a sad tale to a funny one, so I'm not telling it yet. But I think this episode has changed my life forever.

 

I call my new worldview bologna and apples. A person can live a long time off of bologna sandwiches and apples. It might not be optimal or "the best" but it is sustainable under the harshest circumstances.

 

When things are getting harsh. Stage 1: secure the bologna and apples. Only when the bologna and apples are secure, will I look at attempting "better". I do not want to again be stuck at home without food and a migraine so bad I really cannot walk without toppling over. I went hungry because I tried and failed at "better" and ended out with nothing.

 

I found a piece of frostbitten pizza in the freezer that I didn't know I had. I overdosed on enough ibuprophen to maybe damage my liver. I gmanaged to get on my feet enough to go get some bologna and apples. I was able to get secure again, but...while lying on floor caught in a catch 22 situation I wasn't sure I was going to be able to get out of on my own, I made a promise to myself.

 

Bologna and apples first. Then attempt "better". Maybe.

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I agree that Spaulding would be the gold star program, but it would require teacher training and would take some time to get going.

A more immediate solution (or at least a band aid) could be computer based instruction such as Headsprout or Reading Eggs especially at the k-1 level. Reading A to Z is also a good resource. While most of the downloadable books are sight word based, it does have a phonics based series. It is also good if the school has limited resources for actual books. Teachers can download and print out multiple copies of the books that could be sent home with each kid.

 

If most of the parents do not speek English, the the kids really are english language learners. Many will not have the English vocabulary to go with a reading curriculum designed for native english speakers, so a curriculm designed of ELL might be good.

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Hunter, that is a great story! 

 

I am hearing the advice loud and clear from many of you to focus more on what program will work for the underprepared teachers rather than the gold star program. This makes a lot of sense to me. The teachers said they wanted to learn from us and would come and shadow our work, and they would be there to help but instead they have "disappeared" during our volunteer time. I'm sure they are overworked and underpaid so we really can't blame them. I have already relayed this gem of advice to some of our volunteer team.

 

And I just found a kindergarten teacher in the US who is willing to be our consultant!! 

 

Still feeling overwhelmed but hopeful! 

 

Thanks all!

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