Jump to content

Menu

Any advantages to sending child to public K?


lauraw4321
 Share

Recommended Posts

I promised my DH I would post this here (I probably mention something from the Boards to him at least once a week, so he finds the Hive interesting).  As my sig indicates, I'm HS my 2nd grader.  Next year my middle DD will be Kindergarten-aged.  My oldest did public school for K and 1st before bringing her home this year.

 

DH wants my middle daughter to go to public K also, and then bring her home.  His arguments is that Kindergarten is good for her.  It teaches how to be a part of a group.  How to be patient, follow rules, etc.  We've had (friendly) arguments about it.  He said "post it on the boards and see what they say."  I scoffed a bit, pointing out that they are home schooling boards, but he is convinced that there will be some responses laying out the experiences she will have and will miss out on if she doesn't.

 

If it helps - it is a highly-rated public school.  The main objection we had for our older daughter is that she was bored, and there were no accommodations made for kids who were ahead.  It looks like our middle daughter may have the same issues (i.e. be reading well before K starts).

 

So... I promised him I'd post the question.  Anyone think I should send her?

 

[edited for grammar]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Full disclosure - I didn't send my kids to public school kindy.

 

I don't see any real benefit to pulling a kid back and forth just for the sake of this particular experience. I mean, in terms of this dd's experience, either she'll love it and hate that you're bringing her home and she has to part with all these new friends and this new community she finally settled into or she'll dislike it and have to endure it and whatever educational downsides your "good" school offers. If you wanted her to be in school long term or needed her to be for some reason, that would be one thing, but I don't see the point in putting her on a back and forth like that.

 

Once upon a time kindergarten was mostly about these basic be in a group skills. Now most schools are much more academically focused at the expense of those basic skills. I think if that's your goal, you can find it more easily by having her join scouts, 4-H, etc. I feel like the best "be in a group" learning we did in K-2nd grade was doing Rising Stars through Destination Imagination.

  • Like 11
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I promised my DH I would post this here (I probably mention something from the Boards to him at least once a week, so he finds the Hive interesting).  As my sig indicates, I'm HS my 2nd grader.  Next year my middle DD will be Kindergarten-aged.  My oldest did public school for K and 1st before bringing her home this year.

 

DH wants my middle daughter to go to public K also, and then bring her home.  His arguments is that Kindergarten is good for her.  It teaches how to be a part of a group.  How to be patient, follow rules, etc.  We've had (friendly) arguments about it.  He said "post it on the boards and see what they say."  I scoffed a bit, pointing out that they are home schooling boards, but he is convinced that there will be some responses laying out the experiences she will have and will miss out on if she doesn't.

 

If it helps - it is a highly-rated public school.  The main objection we had for our older daughter is that she was bored, and there was no accommodations made for kids who were ahead.  It looks like our middle daughter may have the same issues (i.e. be reading well before K starts).

 

So... I promised him I'd post the question.  Anyone think I should send her?

 

With all due respect to Mr. Lauraw4321, I think he's totally wrong. Children learned how to be "part of a group" long before such a thing as "kindergarten" was invented. Surely you are teaching her how to be patient, follow the rules, etc. Why would you need to send her away for that? To be with a bunch of other children who are equally socially inept?

 

He hasn't mentioned anything academic, which is the only advantage that a "highly rated public school" might have over being at home., and that didn't work out so well for your older dd, did it?

 

It is not the job of school to teach children social skills. It is the job first of the parents, then of extended family and community. In fact, age-segregated group interactions have not been proven to do such a great job of teaching social skills. Think about that for a minute. 

 

  • Like 10
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You and your dh might want to consider whether, if the K class was an enrichment class offered at a local arts center or the like (perhaps for a fee), it would be a good fit for your child's needs.  Would you sign her up for the class?  

Given that frame/lens, are there other opportunities in the community that might be an even better fit?  An actual art class, a series of nature field trips, some kind of homeschool co-op, a sports activity, a regular homeschooling park day, a book group?  That is, can you get some of the things your dh is looking for elsewhere, perhaps in an a la carte approach?  Or is the kindergarten class a good synthesis of a variety of things, at a good price and a convenient time/location?

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know some families how've sent their younger kids to preschool and kinder so they can spend more time with the older kids. This can be especially helpful of you have a fidgety 3-5 year old who might be disrupting school a lot.

 

Academics would probably not be a concern to me. I'd probably pick a program for preschool or k that's more play based. IMO, I would not want to do it with a full day kindergarten class as I don't think children that young should be doing a full day of school. I would prefer to use it as "social time" and do academics at home in the afternoons.

 

That being said, although the thought crossed my mind plenty of times, I did not send my boisterous boy to preschool or kinder and kept him home instead. We did preschool at home doing about 15 min then 30 min a day of work geared to him and then he tagged along with big sis for our core activities and read aloud time. Now in k he does about an hour of seat work type stuff and then tags along with big sis. I wanted to go ahead address the behavior issues at home and work on getting him used to a school routine at home.

 

As for socializing, right now he does a weekly group horse riding lesson, swim lesson, and we participate in a homeschool group once a week doing field trips or park days. He also attends Sunday school. In preschool he did AWANA's and as a toddler I did MOPS and a stroller stride class. Point is, there are other ways to expose kids to working in a group and socialize them besides school. Maybe address your husband's concerns by planning to participate in something were she's in a group setting a few times a week, at least 1x a week where someone else is the instructor and your not present.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have 3 children, and the 2 oldest attended K5 at the most "prestigious" public school in the district. Parents were literally running over each other to get their children into this school each year. I was not happy with the push on academics for this age group - my children were coming home with hours of homework each night, including having to write paragraphs, which in my opinion is completely child developmentally inappropriate. My daughter's attitude changed as she was tired and snarky from such long days. I felt this school had a "beat the Chinese" type of mentality and had taken everything good and noble out of K5 - recess, rest time, play time, etc. I don't know when these children had time to have social time - every moment of the day was orchestrated and planned, no free time to play, and even at lunch they had to sit silently and eat their meal to make sure they actually ate. I pulled my children out in 1st grade and started homeschooling (that was 5 years ago), it was the best decision I made. My daughter, a flaming extrovert, missed the "social time" with one of her friends, but otherwise loves homeschooling. I've had to work hard to make sure her social needs are met, otherwise she has no interest in going back to school. My son loves homeschooling, the only thing he misses is the routine, and I try to provide that as best as possible.

 

What is my 3rd missing this year from not being in her public K5? I am sad that she is missing some of the "fun" things I can't replicate at home - the school plays, special classroom traditions, and seasonal experiences (May day parade, end of year field day, etc). She doesn't know she is missing them, but I miss them for her because that was my experience and what I enjoyed when I was in school so many moons ago. However, academically she is receiving so much more at home than she ever would at the public school. She is free to pursue her interests and creativity at home. This child LOVES to play - she plays ALL DAY LONG - and needs to play. Recently while doing a little bit of Right Start math (Montessori based and in my opinion fun) she was looking very weak and puny said to me, "Mom I haven't played yet today and I'm tired. I get my power and energy from playing."  I can't imagine how stifled she would feel with the regimen of current kindergarten.  I think it would hinder her progress and development. I'm sad K5 isn't what it used to be - half day, lots of recess and playtime, unstructured time, etc. If I had the money, I might consider true Montessori or Reggio-Emilia program, but definitely not at the local public school. Just my experience.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I tend to agree if I were going to send a child to kinder I would likely pick a half day program in a private Montessori or Waldorf school. That way it's mostly play based, gentle learning and group time. Most PS k is much more academic / test driven and play time and recess is being cut, so even at the best public kinder you wouldn't likely be getting what dh wants.

 

My dd in k got a lot out of her being in AHG, AWANA's, and gymnastics.

 

We did arts and crafts at home.

 

Ds has done similarly in k- homeschool group, swim lessons, horse riding.

 

More activities than that and my kids get grouchy actually lol!

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You learn the things your husband is talking about just fine at home. Probably better, because there aren't a lot of other kids being poor examples. Park days, Sunday school, dance class, story hour at the library, girl scouts, etc are fine extra activities if you really want to prove that she is getting along okay in a group. But school for hours a day? Overkill. And she may pick up bad habits. And...then you have to bring her home agian, which seems unfair to me. 

  • Like 8
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If there's any way you can observe a K class for a day, I'd do it. Kindergarten varies a lot from one place to another, and teachers' style matters.  If you can't observe, ask what the day's schedule looks like and how many kids are in a class.

 

I used to volunteer in some local kindy classes, and while I appreciate what they're trying to do, I always left with a headache, and I couldn't see my DS enjoying it. (Preschool was too much structure for him, and that was only four hours at a stretch.)

 

Your DD could learn to be part of a group a lot of ways--a dance class or another sport, an enrichment group, etc.--if you decide not to send her to PS.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

No, I disagree with him. It isn't "good for her." If you are having trouble with her at home that you cannot get a grip on, or you simply do not have the desire to do kinder, then send her. I have sent all mine to kinder and likely will continue. I have a serious lack of energy and desire for kinder at this point. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I sent my oldest to preschool, and realized after that year that I could homeschool--and they never went back to school. You do not need school to learn how to be part of a group. Here are the places that my kids learned how to be a part of a group over the years:

 

family (yes, families are groups! We probably work MOST on group dynamics--how to work together as a team, how to care for each other and watch out for each other, how to accommodate each others' needs, how to make decisions that benefit all, how to accomplish tasks together, how to have fun together, travel together, or play together etc... in this group). I actually think things like raking leaves as a family or rowing a canoe together present some of the best (or most stressful, depending!) opportunities for learning teamwork, cooperation, communication, and so on. 

 

Sunday school, church, Awana, youth group, art lessons, homeschool classes, co-op groups, field trips, swim lessons, dance lessons, camp, classes at the children's museum, tennis lessons, PE class at the YMCA, children's theatre (both on stage and back stage experiences), speech class (with a group of homeschoolers), parties, T-ball, coach's pitch...

 

We had NO shortage of opportunities to learn how to act and behave in a group, and we tend to be more homebody oriented--I know people who are MUCH more active than we are, who were on the go several times per week.

 

I'd keep her home.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

There are some serious disadvantages though. They make friends at the public kinder so they might want to stay for those friends. They might continue those relationships with those friends only for those friends to pressure them to go to public school. They might pick up bad habits. Sadly, since my child started kinder this year, I hear "moron" "jerk" and "I poofed you!" all the time out of him. I poofed you is referencing passing gas while his back side is point at me and he waves at it. Yuck!

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I completely agree with Farrar's response above. She'd get a better "function in a group" experience from team sports, Scouts, Destination Imagination, or similar ventures than from kindy.

 

My disclosure: I did send my kid to a part-time, play-based private preschool when I was working. She did learn a lot about cooperation. There was lots of good stuff. But there was also a natural transition point. She always knew that when preschool ended and kindergarten began, she would be coming home full time instead of transitioning to public school with her friends.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another vote for homeschool kinder. Your child can have other opportunities to learn to be in a group. At home, you can teach him healthy social interactions better than in a school environment. At school, kids learn coping mechanisms - often unhealthy coping mechanisms. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would argue that the young ages, even up through kindergarten and early elementary, are the times when children MOST need to be spending the majority of their time in their home and not in a different place. Those are some very formative, bonding years and there is so much that serves them and their best interest by being at home. The opportunities for personal growth, independent exploration, and family nurturing are just so much higher than in an alternate program.

 

There are many many ways to give them group experiences and social opportunities without sending them away for the majority of their waking hours five days a week.

 

ETA: If your daughter will be reading before she gets to kindergarten, all the more reason not to put her in a program where much of the focus will be on teaching the majority of the children to read. Think of the joyful learning experiences you can share with her, tailored to her level, if she stays home!

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you plan to homeschool every year after K, I personally don't see much point in sending her. I generally think the school day is a long one (too long) for such young children and I might be afraid of killing her love of learning (or reading, etc.) early on. 

 

That said, of course I don't think public school or kindergarten is evil! I don't think anything "bad" is likely to happen to her. But I kinda don't see the point if you're otherwise set on being a homeschooling family. (Plus, I think the taking her in and dropping her off, as well as any homework, will feel like a burden to your daily homeschooling schedule.) True, your child might enjoy playing with other children, but seeing as it's public K (and not, say, a Waldorf or Montessori K), I'm not sure how much playtime she will actually get. 

 

(I hate to sound like such a Debbie Downer, but that's my honest two cents. Good luck!!) \

 

ETA: I do agree with previous posters that your child might pick up bad habits that you'll then later have to undo. My girls have never been to pre-k or school of any kind, and I've really loved the fact that our family culture and values have shaped them. (Of course we are all works in progress, but at least our kids are not picking up terrible language or habits at a school everyday....)

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We do home kindergarten.

 

We live next to a great school.  It's one of the best in the city, if not the best public elementary.  But the trade-offs weren't worth it.  For our child to go to school, it would have to be an all day thing.  I don't know how much you've seen a group of K students at 1pm, but they're tired.  They're cranky.  They need rest time still, even if they don't nap.  That doesn't happen with their schedule.

And then there's the schedule itself.  2.5-3 hours each of math and reading, alternating throughout the day.  A very quick lunch.  Electives (P.E., library, music, art, social studies) offered once a week, *if available*.  They're on the schedule, but art and music teachers don't work there full time.  They share with other schools.

 

Then, on top of a long day, there is homework.  We'd prefer to ignore it, our 5yo is a box checker.  He would go into a panic attack if it wasn't done.

 

Yes, he'd learn how to work in a group, get along with others, share, be patient, follow rules...but at what cost?  How could we do that to him? 

 

So he's home.  And he does have a long day, with things on the schedule like making cookies or using playdoh.  He has a rest period.  He spends as much or as little time as needed on math and reading (and never 3 hours of each), and gets to do all sorts of other things like art every day.  Music studies.  Spanish.  And the lessons from kindergarten?  They're taught each week at our homeschoolers' playgroup, in daily life, and having friends over.  He's fine.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

^^^this! My k'er still naps for an hour after lunch. He's 6! He has time to play outside and with his toys. He is learning all the same stuff you should learn in k, but in about an hour and a half a day. He's learning how to get along in his family, how to help with household chores, how to find things to do that are positive when he's bored, how to be a big brother to his sister and yes he learns to listen to instructor at his lessons and play in large group of multi-aged children at park day or even waiting in line during field trips.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My friends sent their son to public K and then pulled him out after the first year. They liked the short day (3 hour?) and the rhythm it provided. His parents are extremely bohemian, so this was good for them all. He rode the bus so transportation didn't break up the rest of their day. They had fun with the goofy songs it provided. Their son is extremely accelerated and extremely bright (he had read The Hobbit in the original five times before the age of 7) and his parents are about as nerdy as him, and being in the classroom worked out fine for him.

 

Emily

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My kids both went to a church-based preschool, half days, 3 days per week, then came home and began homeschooling in kindergarten.   I liked the preschool because it was FUN, play based, and they did much more in the way of messy arts & crafts than I ever would have done at home.   Academics were never an issue for us, since one of my children was reading chapter books at 4 (reading the books TO the class during "story time") and the other child wasn't far behind that.   I probably would have pushed more academics if I had kept them home for preschool just for the sake of having something to do.

 

I don't think there's anything wrong with sending a child to kindergarten, but you need to decide what your priorities are for your family.   I will mention that when I was homeschooling one child and still had one in preschool, it was challenging to follow the preschool's schedule.    We had to be out the door on time, didn't have flexibility to do our own activities away from home, and were tied in to their vacation schedule (of course, it was just preschool so it wasn't a big deal if we missed).    You will likely find that having one child in school and one at home will limit the freedom that you would have if both were at home.   Just something to consider.

 

We evaluate our decision to homeschool yearly.   We're coming to a HUGE threshold as my oldest begins high school next year, and I honestly thought that we'd homeschool through middle school then send him to public school for high school.   But now that we are here, we see more opportunities and more benefits if we continue to homeschool through high school.   My point is that your family will grow and your needs may change over the years.   Don't paint yourself into a corner by saying "We'd NEVER do _____" or "We will ALWAYS do _____."

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I sent my K'er this year.  I wish I hadn't.  I am struggling more than he is because I don't want him there, my husband does.  He isn't learning anything new at all, not academically or socially.  All has been review, so there are things that are sticking a bit better now.  He is having fun, though.  

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'll be the contrary one and agree with your DH enthusiastically.  Of course, this totally depends on the general quality of the school, but you said your school was a highly rated one, so I'll answer with that assumption.  I would say that you must look closely at why your school is highly rated.  If the reason is exceptionally high test scores, consider what that school has traded off for those test scores (have they narrowed the curriculum or are the high scores the result of wealthier and more involved parents?).  For this reason, my choice, if I had to do it again, would be a private, play-based kindergarten and preschool that was not bound by state and federal access or testing guidelines. I don't think a full day preschool is necessary or beneficial, and something as simple as 3 days a week/mom's morning out is best, IMO.  I absolutely would not send my kid to an academic, full day preschool again (DD went this way.  She benefitted greatly, but it had drawbacks that I could have avoided with a private play-based kindy).  Anyway... 

 

My kids went to kindy (one went public, one private) and part of elementary school.  I was angry and unhappy at the school experiences in upper elementary because I felt there was unbelievably dumbing down of the curriculum, behavior problems were magnified and allowed to remain in the classroom to the detriment of everyone else, and the test prep was ridiculous and detracted from the school experience.  In the early-middle elementary years, before testing hit full-on, the experience was *OK*, but I felt I could do better academically for my kids.  However, I am very happy I sent my kids to preschool and kindergarten and would make that decision again in a heartbeat.  I agree with your DH that there are a lot of soft social skills to learn in kindergarten and that no, they can't all be taught at home unless you have your own ball team or your child regularly attends places with a group experience.  I do not think for one minute that church groups, cub scouts, or a once-a-week craft class can substitute for the regularity and close-knit nature of a class that sees each other often.  I am enormously proud of my kids' social graces and abilities, their ability to work cooperatively in a group, their ability to play well with others, and their understanding that the world doesn't revolve around them and that they need to "take turns" with others.  They have built a "friend base" that has lasted to this day (they are not 11 and 13).  I am somewhat embarrassed to admit that I credit preschool and kindy with these skills and not myself, and I recognize that outsourcing these lessons is as valuable as outsourcing calculus in high school if the parent deems it the best option for their child.  Crafts weren't happening in my home.  If I wanted my kid to hold a pair of scissors and know what glue is, it was going to be taught by someone else.  I completely agree with your DH's assessment of the value of kindergarten.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Disclaimer-- I haven't read all of the responses. 

 

I sent two of my kids to public kindergarten.  Advantages were that they made more friends in our neighborhood and got to ride the bus.  Riding the bus was a big deal to my kids.  This was a half-day program. 

 

One child benefitted quite a bit because he had a great teacher who got him to write.  All I could get him to write before K was his name in all capital letters.

 

The other child didn't learn anything because she was so far ahead, but she had a fun time.  Since it was only half-day, I had time to give her appropriate academic work at home.

 

Disadvantages included non-Christian influences.  My daughter had to learn a Kwanzaa song set to the tune of Go Tell It On the Mountain, the original version of which we sing at church (!!!).  After that dreadful Christmas (er...I mean Winter Holiday) program, I decided to keep my third child home for K.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am sending my kids to public kindergarten and it's been great. The twins goals ( according to my husband and I) areto practice writing and get to know some kids that live in the neighborhood. The program is only 2.5 hours a day, so it's works....they see kids/play and we homeschool in the afternoon. It's only about an hour of work at home so it's been a blessing. Also, the school uses Jolly phonics and math in focus which has helped reinforced homeschooling.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  I agree with your DH that there are a lot of soft social skills to learn in kindergarten and that no, they can't all be taught at home unless you have your own ball team or your child regularly attends places with a group experience.  I do not think for one minute that church groups, cub scouts, or a once-a-week craft class can substitute for the regularity and close-knit nature of a class that sees each other often.  I am enormously proud of my kids' social graces and abilities, their ability to work cooperatively in a group, their ability to play well with others, and their understanding that the world doesn't revolve around them and that they need to "take turns" with others.

 

With all due respect, my 5 year old who is home for kindy knows all the bolded as well. She works with the rest of the family to clean up, plays together with her cousins, and plays games at the park with groups of children at weekly park dates with no issues. She takes turns with those children, but more so, she takes turns with her little brother all day long. Who gets to pick the next book, the next tv show, the dessert, who gets to get the mail today, who gets to carry the box of donuts...all these things involve taking turns and don't require a classroom. She has to wait when she wants something more often than not, and has been complimented by her Sunday school teacher for her empathy and social skills. You don't need a classroom of kids to teach those things. That's a relatively new idea.

 

As for glue and scissors...not sure how you homeschool without them, but I guess it can be done. We have all that hanging in a pocket type storage thing on the door to the garage from the kitchen. The kids have free range of scissors, glue, paper, crayons, etc all day long. Yes, even my 3 year old. He only cut his hair once :)

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We have had a very positive experience sending our youngest to kindly while the older 2 have been home.

 

He has his place to shine, not overshadowed by sibs who are bigger, faster, smarter etc.

 

He has learned more self control there than he had at home and that has brought confidence.

 

His fine motor skills are way better than they would have been had he stayed at home.

 

Another benefit is that it has helped our family connect more to other ps families in the neighborhood. That has benefitted my homeschooled kids too.

 

It is not perfect and we have had grass-is-greener at times. He is in 1st there now and is thriving. His teacher is amazing and has broadened his interests in many ways. We will probably bring him home b4 3rd but in the meantime having him there frees me to focus more on my middle who need me most now.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I see no reason to start a kid in an environment you don't plan to continue. It seems mean. "Here, kid, get to know the teachers and kids at school, endure the pro-school propaganda, but don't get too attached, because you won't be here again next year." It seems like a lot of disruption for little (if any) gain. My younger two have never been to school, but it would be ludicrous to suggest they don't know how to be part of a group.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

DS2 and DD both loved kindergarten at school.  It also allowed me to concentrate on my eldest, which was wonderful for him too, because he wanted that one on one time with me.  Even though DD was ahead of the group, she still thrived.  DS2 was in a  Montessori magnet school which he adored (and which allowed him to work at his pace.) Had we stayed in that area, I probably would have let him continue there.

 

You can always try kindergarten and change your mind later.  it doesn't have to be forever.  

DS3 loved going to VPK last year but is now homeschooling.  It has helped with homeschooling rather than hurt it, IMHO.

 

 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

DS2 and DD both loved kindergarten at school. It also allowed me to concentrate on my eldest, which was wonderful for him too, because he wanted that one on one time with me. Even though DD was ahead of the group, she still thrived. DS2 was in a Montessori magnet school which he adored (and which allowed him to work at his pace.) Had we stayed in that area, I probably would have let him continue there.

 

You can always try kindergarten and change your mind later. it doesn't have to be forever.

DS3 loved going to VPK last year but is now homeschooling. It has helped with homeschooling rather than hurt it, IMHO.

Under these circumstances I could see this as an option. When I did preschool at home with ds, it made sense for a lot of reasons. I only had 2 children, and I was homeschooling kids that were only 2 years apart, so having a preschooler / k'er tag along for k, 1, & 2nd was pretty easy. They did the same core and add some preschool / k workbooks.

 

Now I have an 18 month old in addition to a 6 & 8 year old and twins on the way. In order to make homeschool work, half day preschool and kinder might be something I would need to do to get school done with olders while giving them what they need until they are old enough to join is. But on the other hand I love having my older kids home with me with a little one. Watching them play with her when we go to story time is previous! And snuggling a baby while we read is so sweet. I love the family unity of it all.

 

My dd went to preschool and when we decided to homeschool she'd sometimes but for the most part it wasn't a big issue. When she attended preschool homeschool was not on my agenda. She had a mostly positive experience.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I see no reason to start a kid in an environment you don't plan to continue. It seems mean. "Here, kid, get to know the teachers and kids at school, endure the pro-school propaganda, but don't get too attached, because you won't be here again next year." It seems like a lot of disruption for little (if any) gain. My younger two have never been to school, but it would be ludicrous to suggest they don't know how to be part of a group.

ITA^^ If it's only a group environment you're looking for, there are lots of ways other than school to get that. Maybe try a co-op next year?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...