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Dr. Hive: diabetes resource recommendations


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DH was just diagnosed and starts meds and insulin today. (I'm so glad he didn't dismiss my suspicions earlier this week based on symptoms he's been having and made an appointment even though he thought I was being a hypochondriac.)

Right now I'm overwhelmed by all the information available online and would appreciate the Hive's specific recommendations for books, ebooks, websites about diabetes. Or maybe it would be better not to go into research mode yet but just focus on what the doctor told us this morning, which was already a lot to process? He'll be tracking his numbers twice a day and will follow up with the doctor again in a couple of weeks.

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I'm not diabetic, but I have done some reading about it because I have a family history, and I have reactive hypoglycemia and numbers in the "pre-diabetic" range. I've found this website to be really helpful: http://www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/

 

And good for you for getting him to the doctor! :grouphug:

 

That site has some good info. Thanks.

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Hmmm... Some general advice. Because he is starting insulin, he will need to test. If the doctor said twice a day, that's really AT LEAST twice a day. If he "feels bad" or off or exhausted or shaky, then he needs to test. It will be helpful to the doctor to know how well the insulin is working. This is early days and don't be afraid to use those test strips.

 

Keeping a food journal is usually very helpful, especially in the early days. Write down insulin doses in the log and the time given. Write down if he feels bad or off or shaky or exhausted. Two weeks from now, it will be hard to remember what was going on when he goes in for his appointment.

 

Be prepared for lows - low blood sugar readings. Since he is taking insulin, it's a definite possibility. Carry the tablets or the gel, keep a snack in his bag or in the car. People are different as to exactly what level makes them feel rotten and too low, so he will have to figure out what works for him. For me, it's 72.

 

Diabetes is complicated. Get good quality socks that don't rub (protect those feet) and schedule an eye exam if he hasnt had one in a while.

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Hmmm... Some general advice. Because he is starting insulin, he will need to test. If the doctor said twice a day, that's really AT LEAST twice a day. If he "feels bad" or off or exhausted or shaky, then he needs to test. It will be helpful to the doctor to know how well the insulin is working. This is early days and don't be afraid to use those test strips.

 

Keeping a food journal is usually very helpful, especially in the early days. Write down insulin doses in the log and the time given. Write down if he feels bad or off or shaky or exhausted. Two weeks from now, it will be hard to remember what was going on when he goes in for his appointment.

 

Be prepared for lows - low blood sugar readings. Since he is taking insulin, it's a definite possibility. Carry the tablets or the gel, keep a snack in his bag or in the car. People are different as to exactly what level makes them feel rotten and too low, so he will have to figure out what works for him. For me, it's 72.

 

Diabetes is complicated. Get good quality socks that don't rub (protect those feet) and schedule an

eye exam if he hasnt had one in a while.

Thank you! This is helpful.

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I've had gestational diabetes with all four of my pregnancies.  I had to use insulin and I want to say glyburide.  When I had blood sugar lows, it was usually the middle of the night.  I would feel sweaty and just not right.  That was my cue to test.  

 

Medical device companies who make blood glucose testing machines make money off of the strips.  So depending on your insurance company, that's something to look at.  For me, it was cheapest to buy a Walmart Relion meter and their strips.  Even less than what my insurance paid for OneTouch.  You don't have to use the same brand of lancet as your machine.  I chose one that had the highest gauge lancets.  Higher gauge means thinner lancet.  That's another thing to watch for prices.   My favorite had a cartridge like thing of lancets so you only replaced it every six times or something.  Looking on Amazon, I think it was the Accu-Chek.

 

There was a good book out maybe 5-10 years ago by Oprah's trainer Bob Harper on Diabetes.  It really went into a lot.  I remember there was a chart that equated your HbA1c with your average blood sugar and I thought that was really interesting.  It's probably at your local library.

 

Yes, schedule an eye exam, ideally with a retina specialist.  If your Dh has gotten new glasses recently know that his Rx may change once his blood sugars are under control.

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