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Reclassify junior as senior??


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My daughter is a junior and in dual enrollment. I looked up her requirements for general ed (as a Special Ed major at our local university she wants to attend) will be done after this year bc she had AP tests last year too. We want to reclassify her as a senior to apply early decision in October. Her June ACT score was in the 90% of what they accept.

 

Can you help me think through this? Her AP reports, online class transcripts and National Latin Exam all have school years but not grades on them. Her 8th grade classes were all high school level and mostly online.

 

Any reason not to do it?

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I would see if the university has early admission. At our local university early admission is simply entering college after junior year of high school. That way you do not have to try and reclassify your student as a senior. It is merely entering college after three years of high school. Locally, it requires one extra essay, but otherwise the application process is the same.

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I'm following along because that is what we are doing with our dd. She knows where she wants to go and has all the credits. She needs to improve her ACT and is scheduled to retake it next month. As long as that goes well, this will be her senior year and she'll move on. I haven't been able to come up with any reasons not to do it. She is academically, socially, and emotionally well prepared to go to her choice of University next year. There is no point hanging around doing another year at the CC that I can think of. 

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What about the psat and National Merit scholarship money? I really don't understand the whole system and think it varies by state but since she had a good score on the ACT you might want to investigate that part of the decision.

 

Personally I think she should go ahead and graduate if that is what she wants. The psat was simply the first thing that popped into my head.

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Hindsight being 20/20, I wish I had done this for my daughter and let her be a true college freshman this year instead of a HS senior doing full-time DE.  She is ready to move on (and out).  It also would have spread our college kids out another year so that we don't have a year of overlap.  Anyhow, with that perspective, the issues I would consider:

 

1.  Would she be more competitive for merit scholarships if she waits another year?  Does it matter?

2.  Is she worldly enough to go off to school a year early, or is she not going off to school so that it doesn't matter so much?  I ask because back in the Dark Ages, when this was me, I graduated early and entered college at 17.  I was fine academically but didn't really have the social confidence I needed to make the most of college.  If she skipped her senior year of HS, my daughter would be almost exactly the age I was when I started college.  I've realized, though, that her upbringing was much different than mine, and socially, she probably would have been fine this year.  She will be better next year, but she would have been fine to go early.  Lots of kids could use that extra year.

3.  If she may be National Merit eligible, I think you actually can skip your senior year of HS and still get the NM scholarship beginning your sophomore year of college.  I looked at this once and found (or asked) this question on College Confidential.

 

 

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She is certain she wants to major in special education - adapted curriculum (working with severe/profound disabilities). There aren't any more prestigious schools that offer it anyway. She really really wants to live at home. So, scholarships aren't needed anyway... We are kind of looking at it like - she would be driving to cc dual enrollment or driving to university. Either way, she is a 17 year old taking college classes. The university classes will count towards her degree.

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Yes. But her senior year classes won't cut toward her major, so wouldn't transfer. She completely meets general ed requirements and equivalent of associates degree this year! Bc she took AP tests too when younger...

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For example, next year she would have to take Calculus and Biology at dual enrollment - dreaded subjects that wouldn't transfer bc they aren't required for her major. Same with any additional humanities classes. She will have fulfilled all requirements. So even thought it is "free", it seems like a collossal waste of time and effort.

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Yes. But her senior year classes won't cut toward her major, so wouldn't transfer. She completely meets general ed requirements and equivalent of associates degree this year! Bc she took AP tests too when younger...

 

If the school she's looking at, the university, is a state school she might get free tuition there, to (as early enrollment/dual enrollment).  that's what happened with me. I did early enrollment at FAU my senior year. I lived on campus, took a full load, etc. But it was all free (other than room and board) because the state paid for early enrollment the same way they do dual enrollment.

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Would it be an option to take courses that would transfer into a standard education degree with the idea of getting two degrees or a dual major. Thinking this could lead to a standard teaching license as well as the special ed.

 

For example our cc has math for elementary teachers.

 

When I got my MS Ed I had to go back and do an earth science undergrad course just so I'd have science courses that were distributed correctly to support my middle school endorsement.

 

Are there early childhood education courses that would be of value?

 

But it would all depend on what works with her goals. Not every course of value will transfer. My son expects to take calculus at the CC and again at the Uni. But the experience will help him with his STEM degree.

 

On the actual question I think you could reassign her grades or you could simply graduate her early.

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We are doing something similar. Graduating early ( at least on paper) made sense for dd goals. She also wants to major in special ed and there is a guaranteed admission to her program with specific classes. Those classes are required for her major, and will decrease the amount of time needed for her degree. If dd did the traditional dual credit courses, this wouldn't work. We intend to fill in a few spots for lit and history still at home..so it is graduating early on paper.

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We'll probably do that.

 

One of mine is a 10th on paper, but we're 95% sure she'll graduate early so at home we call her an 11th grader. So her transcript that I update on an ongoing basis has what she did in 8th (all high-school level work) as 9th.

 

We decided to skip the PSAT this year because she's an unconventional thinker and doesn't test at all near what she'd need for National Merit in our high-score state. We're very busy, and figured we'd focus on the ACT this year because it reflects her thinking better.

 

Then in January, we'll decide if we'll call 2016-2017 her 12th grader year or not because certain classes will have to be taken. Or she might do another year and pursue some other interests. We'll see.

 

 

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We ended up graduating my younger DS a year early.  The CC here just wasn't going to cut it.  This year should be his senior year of high school, but he'll be done with his Freshman year of college in December.  He's taking CC classes this fall as we made that work, but will be leaving for school in January. He'll also be 18 in December, so that helps.  It is a bummer, though, as scholarship deadlines at the college are all based on Fall enrollment, so we'll miss out on a semester of those. 

There were a number of other factors we had to look at, and every situation is so different - you can only just try to go with your gut and cross your fingers :)

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I graduated ds a year early. I started looking at this option due to our chaotic life situation. His 8th grade work was high school level and he was ready to move on. In our case, dual-enrollment was discounted, but still out of my budget. He knows what field he wants to pursue, just not totally decided on which degree. In one case, he'll need to transfer and probably would need 5 years minimum to graduate. With the other he can stay local (live at home) and finish in four. 

 

 

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Thanks everyone. We decided to do it. Dropped AP lit bc it was elective instead of required and added 2 minimester 8 week dual enrolled required courses. She will apply early decision in Oct. We feel good about. Local reactions have been somewhat negative, so I appreciate hearing some other opinions.

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