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Ohio's College Credit Plus, any experience?


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So it's looking more and more like we'll be moving to Columbus Ohio this Christmas.  I've trying to figure out how useful College Credit Plus is for us. My questions are:

 

How many classes can a student take per semester?  

 

Can you take non-credit classes like Algebra and Geometry, remedial for the college student type classes?

 

Is the system of getting approved and enrolled beyond difficult?

 

 

 

Thanks.

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College Credit Plus is a brand new program in Ohio. No one has any experience with it yet, beyond enrollment. Approval comes from the institution where you want to enroll your child. If the college or university accepts your child, and they meet the age requirement of 7th grade or higher, then you shouldn't be turned down by CCP. However, I don't think they have adequate funding in place for homeschoolers. And since they said they will start with 12th graders and fund all of their classes first, and then work their way down, I doubt there will be much, if any, money left for 11th graders, let alone anyone younger. But we'll see what happens. So being accepted into CCP and actually having them pay for your classes are two different things.

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According to the College Credit Plus website, you can't take any remedial classes.

 

Once you are admitted to a college for College Credit Plus, you may take any course in the college’s course catalogue that is not remedial or religious, and that applies toward a degree or professional certificate, in a subject area in which you are college-ready. 

 

https://www.ohiohighered.org/node/5557

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You also have to fill out a form through the state to apply for funding (this is separate from the college forms).  I have not done it, but I have a friend whose son is doing taking classes at a local university.  He will be a junior and I believe he received funding for 2 classes.  

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This is our first year with it - my DS is a senior.  

 

They don't fund ALL the senior's classes first - they give all the seniors one class, then the juniors and so on down.  If there is money left over after everyone gets one class, they go back to the seniors, and give them another one.  I am waiting on the funding letter in the mail tday (hopefully)

 

I am pretty sure the lowest math you can take is College Algebra.  

 

Carolyn

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This is our first year with it - my DS is a senior.  

 

They don't fund ALL the senior's classes first - they give all the seniors one class, then the juniors and so on down.  If there is money left over after everyone gets one class, they go back to the seniors, and give them another one.  I am waiting on the funding letter in the mail tday (hopefully)

 

I am pretty sure the lowest math you can take is College Algebra.  

 

Carolyn

That's not what they told me when I called.  I think that's how it was with the old program, but when I called about the new approach they told me what Greta said.  But I don't really know.  

 

The op has some time anyway, because there's no rolling admission.  You won't be able to get in till the next year.  Or maybe there is and I don't know about it?

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Well, now I can't find the link to the funding info.  Some of the regulations were not finalized until very recently, that could be it.  Still waiting on our funding letter, which, according to the website,  should have been mailed Monday.  It now looks like homeschoolers are responsible for paying for textbooks as well.

 

You're right, there is no rolling admission.  You need to file a notice to participate by April,  apply and get accepted to the college's program by their own deadlines, and file the application for funding by June 30.  It was originally June 15, and they extended it this year. 

 

I think the hugest changes to the program were for public high school students.  The high schools are required to inform their students about the program, and can not prevent a student who is accepted by a colleges CCP program from participating.  I know of a  few local high schools who tried to prevent some of their students from participating in the PSEO because they wanted to keep their best students at the high school.

 

Carolyn

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Well, now I can't find the link to the funding info.  Some of the regulations were not finalized until very recently, that could be it.  Still waiting on our funding letter, which, according to the website,  should have been mailed Monday.  It now looks like homeschoolers are responsible for paying for textbooks as well.

 

 

Carolyn

 

At the info session I attended, which was led by someone from the CCP program, the speaker said that homeschoolers would have to pay for their own books (which is a change from the old PSEO program). She also said that all of the seniors' classes would be paid for, then all of the juniors', and on down the line. The system you described of awarding one class to each senior, then one to each junior, etc is how it was done under the old PSEO system. But last I knew, they had only allocated $250,000 for homeschoolers, which I don't think will go very far. Last year that only covered one class per high school student, with enough left over to award a second class to a few seniors. 

 

There is the option of enrolling in the local public high school and trying to participate in the CCP program that way. I don't know what hoops you would have to jump through, but you may have a better chance of getting classes funded that way. However, remedial classes still wouldn't be covered. The whole point of the program is to give advanced students who are ready for college level work the opportunity to earn college credit while still in high school.

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You also have to fill out a form through the state to apply for funding (this is separate from the college forms).  I have not done it, but I have a friend whose son is doing taking classes at a local university.  He will be a junior and I believe he received funding for 2 classes.  

 

 I'm glad to know there was enough money to fund some classes for the juniors. Do you happen to know if your friend's son asked for funding for more than two classes? 

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I called this morning because I was getting impatient for the letter.  Wendy Cantrell looked up the info for me and my 12 grade ds was awarded 8 credit hours (which was all we asked for).

 

 She said she did know students were beginning to receive their letters because she had gotten some phone calls this morning.  I got the impression they were not happy phone calls.  

 

Carolyn

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As a tax payer it really bugs me that they're giving carte blanche to the ps kids but severe limits to homeschoolers.  AND, to make it even worse, they extended enrollment down to 7th graders!  So more people eligible, insufficient funds to do it right, typical gov't.

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When ds went through the process of applying to CCP last year as a homeschool student who was part time enrolled in the local public high school, he was told that he would be considered a public high school student and would qualify for the full 30 college credit hours (minus the credit hours he would be taking at the local high school). So if you child is interested in taking a class at the local school, this might be an option to qualify for the full amount of credit hours. Hope this helps.

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For foxbridge academy - according to a post on the CHEO (Christian Home Educators of Ohio) facebook page, only 75% of seniors received CCP funding for the upcoming school year before they ran out of funds. So unless they allocate more funds for homeschoolers in upcoming years, it is unlikely that your child will have any classes paid for before 12th grade.

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When ds went through the process of applying to CCP last year as a homeschool student who was part time enrolled in the local public high school, he was told that he would be considered a public high school student and would qualify for the full 30 college credit hours (minus the credit hours he would be taking at the local high school). So if you child is interested in taking a class at the local school, this might be an option to qualify for the full amount of credit hours. Hope this helps.

So is it common for HSer's in Ohio to do partial enrollment at B&M P.S.?  Or is it only certain districts/areas?  My DD would benefit from that setup the best. 

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Hey Mom2boys, are they saying what the stats were then for ps kids?  Did they literally get carte blanche the way the info session online implied, or were there limits there too?

I'd like to know also. My nephew will be living with us doing K12 P.S. and if can take Univ. credit instead of just H.S. that would help a lot.

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So is it common for HSer's in Ohio to do partial enrollment at B&M P.S.?  Or is it only certain districts/areas?  My DD would benefit from that setup the best. 

 

It is up to the discretion of each individual school district to decide whether or not to allow homeschoolers to partially enroll in their local public school.  My school district is the only district in my area that permits homeschoolers to partially enroll.

 

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So is it common for HSer's in Ohio to do partial enrollment at B&M P.S.?  Or is it only certain districts/areas?  My DD would benefit from that setup the best. 

I think it depends on the policy of the local high school. I think the high school can choose to allow partial enrollment or not. In answer to the other question about public school students having access to the funding of the full 30 credit hours- yes I think they can choose to use the full amount minus the credits of the high school classes they are taking (1 HS credit = 3 college credits).

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Hey Mom2boys, are they saying what the stats were then for ps kids?  Did they literally get carte blanche the way the info session online implied, or were there limits there too?

 

I haven't heard any stats for public school kids. I did hear that private school seniors were funded and there was enough money left over to award 3 credit hours to each junior.

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