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Moms of 4 or more, what math do you use?


vaquitita
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  1. 1. What math curriculum do you use, when you have 4 or more kids?



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Well, I have 4, but I use RightStart which is mom intensive.

 

A friend of mine has 8.... they use Math U See, she rotates who has a new lesson and the rest are working on the review sheets...

 

CLE is fairly independent partway through Level 2....

 

 

Sent from my SM-T530NU using Tapatalk

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We used Horizons in the lower grades (thru grade 5) because the write-in workbooks were really nice. Grades 5-7 we used Saxon, then have used mostly public school text books since then. Another math series I like very much is Holt.

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Use whatever math program works for you and your dc.

 

 

Just pencil in a math hour.  Stagger them.  Let the littles play or read until it's their turn to start.  So, say you start the oldest at 9am...do all the teacher-intensive parts to the oldest's lesson until 9:20.  Send oldest off to work the rest alone.  Next child has a 20min math lesson with mom, and is sent off to work while you do a 20min lesson with the 3rd child...

 

This gives the oldest plenty of time to finish their math lesson while you teach the rest, and the youngest probably only needs 20min with mom anyway.  If the older ones finish their math before you are done with the youngest, they can start another subject, read or draw.

 

 

20min x 4 kids is an hour and 20min.  It's important to actually teach math.  I've made the mistake of trusting a child to do the work independently and come to me with questions, and it doesn't go well.  20min per kid, daily.  If you have 2 dc who are close in ability, you can combine them and save time.

 

 

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Other. None are on that list. I have 6. The younger ones are K, 2nd, 5th, and 7th, and the other two are highschoolers. They've all been homeschooled from the beginning.

 

Rod and Staff for early elementary and average math students beyond that.

 

Horizons workbooks were a perfect fit for my advanced math kids, whose level outpaced their hands' ability to keep up with R&S textbooks above their maturity level. (Think 8yo in their 6th grade textbook.) The 2nd grader only completed R&S 1 before starting Horizons.

 

Art of Problem Solving prealg for the ones that needed even more challenge after a couple years of Horizons.

 

This fall....

K - Rod and Staff 1 (starts with number recognition and gently, thoroughly covers 1-10 facts)

2nd - Horizons 3 + Beast Academy for "fun" math on the side to help keep her engaged (advanced, again, I swear it skips a generation...)

5th - AoPS prealg

7th - finish AoPS prealg and into introductory alg

 

The kindy boy's path is undecided at this point. R&S vs Horizons depends on which one will fit him best.

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I voted Saxon in the poll.  We use Saxon beginning at grade 4.  K-3 we use Abeka.

 

Ds14 is in Algebra 2 and I'm struggling.  I am planning to implement the plan that 4blessingmom posted above.  We have been doing something like that, but much more relaxed.  I think that structure will help a lot.

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I have 4, but one is only preschool age. I voted other.

 

DD has used mostly MM until this last year. She bogged down and we started the year over using Singapore. It is going much better now. She is about to finish and will be moving on to AOPS PreA

 

DS1 uses Singapore as he needed more white space on the paper. MM intimidated him. 

 

DS2. uses MM as he is not bothered by the lack of white space on the page and he is very competitive. He compared himself to his older brother too much and older brother's self esteem was feeling wounded. I needed to keep them in separate curriculum so they couldnt compare.

 

All 3 have or currently use Miquon on Fridays and DS1 is also doing some Beast Academy. He loves the different style of lessons. As we do not do all this in one day, it doesnt seem intensive or overwhelming.

 

The thing I find the most challenging is keeping the preschooler occupied so we can complete anything.

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I have one in AoPS, 1 in CLE/BA combo, and the youngest 2 are both in CLE.

 

Math is my time intensive subject though. I spend 45 min with my oldest and about 20 min with each of my youngers teaching math. Except for BA, these programs are all self teaching, but I did not pick them for that reason. I picked them because I thought they were the best for each of my kids. I have seen too many moms, pleased as punch that they can "just hand them the workbook" regret it later. Not saying that was your plan, but I would be remiss to not mention it on a thread like this.

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I don't think it is the curriculum that matters as much as time management and mastering a familial flow. Learning how to teach one and having that child being disciplined enough to sit quietly and work independently or wait quietly with their questions without interrupting while I work with another child is the biggest hurdle. The kids learn to move on the questions they can answer without my help and then when I am available ask for assistance. If they can't do any more independently without help, they read another assignment, etc.

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If you really want Math to be more independent, how about Teaching Textbooks?  I know lots of people on this board are not fans of it, but it has helped my daughter understand the new math concepts as they come up, and it is now a subject that is really on her own.  I look over the gradebook and check in with her a few times a week, and ask if anything has been difficult for her. 

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I used Math Mammoth for my oldest grades 1-3 and second child for 1st. I recently purchased CLE hoping for more math independence and retention. Now I wished I had it from the beginning! MM was ok, but to me it wasn't as self teaching as everyone claims. I felt like I had to sit there the entire time. My dd is working on the last half of the CLE 1st grade to be ready for the 2nd grade in the fall. After teaching the new concept she can work on her own. Much more independent if that is what you are looking for!

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I like 8Fills answer better. :coolgleamA:

 

In my house it doesn't really matter if every kid uses the same book. I still have to spend an appropriate amount of time actively teaching regardless. Having everyone streamlined in the same thing would have made more work for me in the long run.  One DC struggled with math for years, while another one can chomp through two complete math lessons in 30 minutes without breaking a sweat. The books the latter has thrived in would have only made it worse for the former.

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Er...my answer probably won't be helpful, either.   :001_unsure:

 

13 yro:  finishing Lial's Beginning Algebra and Life of Fred Algebra (she had to pause LOF because she was struggling with the word problems and Lial's explained them better).  I think we're moving to Jacobs Geometry next.

12 yro: finishing Lial's Basic College Math - although he's going to take a break to work thru some of the Key to... series to solidify his fractions/decimals/percents.  We may do Key to Algebra (I'm thinkin' about it).

10 yro: switching from Singapore to Beast Academy (I think permanently), periodically works on Life of Fred for fun

7 yro: taking a Singapore break to work on Miquon (will resume Singapore next year), also works on Life of Fred for fun

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Title says it all. I'm looking for ways to simplify, to not spread myself so thin by having less mom intensive curriculum. I tried to list common curriculums I hear mentioned by those who are time crunched.

 

If I were trying to simplify (and wanted just one program), I would just use Singapore Math for everyone.  But I'm a big Singapore Math fan.  Your oldest is 9, so you won't run out of SM for awhile.  After 6B (I think that's the last workbook), you'll have to switch to something else.  

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I would say mostly Horizons 3-6. It's more complicated than that-but if you want my easy to use, go to curriculum that gets done with excellent results that's it. my friend who had 9 switched to CLE when she needed a less teacher intensive program and is also pleased.

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Nm

 

I'm not sure why you deleted this. I hope you don't mind me responding now. I find that CLE works great as the type of program where you teach the lesson and then set them up to work independently. I struggled to juggle SM, too. CLE is much more streamlined. You have the new lesson with several problems to work on then the remaining lesson is review. It is very rare that one of my kids need help once they are doing the "We Remember" section. Some of my kids are quicker learners, some slower. Some of them need oodles of review, some need less. I have found CLE to be very adaptable to their different needs.

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I <3 MUS

 

The clever manipulatives make it simpler for me to teach and help and have helped my own sense of how math works rather than just know how to get the right answer.

 

For the last 4 years, since I had multiple math students, we started with a math hour. I gave everyone the next page they should do, staggered who had a new lesson if 2 were ready, and could move from student to student depending on who needed "at-elbow" help vs. "hovering." But I do think math requires the hovering stage and can't be totally independent. My mom set me off as independent with Saxon at 12 ("just come to me if you have questions" -- ha! Like I was going to volunteer for frustration) and I totally shipwrecked and no one knew it for 3 years, when I was halfway through Saxon Algebra 2 and clueless. 

 

So I'm committed to checking math pages every day and working with students to make sure they get the right answers.

 

However, now that I have four students actually doing math, I am not going to have everyone doing math at the same time because it was too crazy at the end of last year and I just stopped the Kindergarten student so I could help the older ones. 

 

They'll all have their math page and assignment, and the older two (7th & 5th) will get started on their own, but have a "tutoring time" with me where we'll start by looking at their math together. Usually the increments in MUS are small enough and explained well enough in the video that they can do it, but sometimes they hit a conceptual roadblock. 

 

For my 2nd grader & K/1, I'll sit and do their math with them, one on each side, but it takes 15 minutes tops. I make sure they can explain what they're doing with the blocks and make them use the blocks to figure out the answer rather than wildly guess. 

 

It is hugely helpful for me to not be the one to introduce concepts, though - the math teacher can be turned off and on, and no matter how many times he has to repeat himself, he's always cheerful and has a joke. If I had to teach 4 math lessons in succession, I would not be smiling by the end. When I'm only jumping in to help, I can manage that. :)

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All four of mine currently in school use Rod and Staff.  Three of them supplement with Singapore's CWP to add more for those who want/need more.  (MEP and Miquon are also wonderful add ins for those who want or need more). 

 

 ETA: I think that R&S gives a good base, and lessons that are consistently teachable for the average mom, and doable for the average kid.  If I have the need or want to supplement, there is room to do so.  If I am pressed for time, R&S on its own is still a good base.

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I'm not sure why you deleted this. I hope you don't mind me responding now. I find that CLE works great as the type of program where you teach the lesson and then set them up to work independently. I struggled to juggle SM, too. CLE is much more streamlined.

I just moved it to my first post, I figured it would be more likely to be seen.

 

I think CLE and study time are probably similar?

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We handle the math lesson problem by including it in a "mom meeting" every day.  I rotate from the oldest to youngest in a meeting that covers their math lesson, their dictation and their reading lesson (or practice) and their daily assignments.  All other work is done as a group (writing, history, read aloud, language arts lesson) or independently (math facts/games, phonics workbook, spelling on computer, quiet reading, math workbook).  The kids interrupt me when they have questions  (it's annoying) and I have the older kids assigned to work with my K'er to help him know what to do in phonics pages, etc.  My oldest (12) has two mom meetings a day and a math lesson with dad in the evenings.  He is starting pre-algebra and that is when I hand off the math lessons to dad so I can focus on the younger kids. His first mom meeting is an assignment meeting (quick) and the second one is at the end of the day during quiet hour and is an accountability meeting (longer, check his work).

 

I have spent a lot of time and money switching math curriculums and I really think the solution was to learn to work with the curriculum that speaks to me.  I really like Singapore and although it is not a perfect fit in every way for each of my children, we massage the workbook, textbook, math facts programs, etc until it works!

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Seeing your update, I don't believe my answer will be of much help. I have used Singapore Primary all of my children. In addition to this, I have all my of the original Challenging Word problem books, when ch we used on Fridays. I don't sed RSA1 for kinder ith my third, and currently with my youngest. I felt the two complimented each other well, but RS said is time intensive. Life of Fred Fractions, and Decimals books are used for summer reviews after 4th and 5th. The kids live these books, but I would not consider them to be stand alone.

 

As far as hig's and what not, I read things the day before work was to be done. If necessary, I presented the topics to my dc. One ds was able to practically teach her mself, but the other needed the one on one. In hind sight, I'd say that this time last s not wasted. It is very important that student grasp the method, otherwise they can hit a wall in year 4, and possibly 5.

 

HTH

 

Please excuse spelling. My auto correct has been having some real fun with me lately.

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Math Mammoth and Life of Fred for 1st and 2nd grade

Teaching Textbooks and Life of Fred for 3rd grade and up

 

Next year I will have 7th, 6th, 3rd, and 1st. The 7th grader is quite accelerated in math is working through LOF Advanced Algebra and TT Algebra 1.

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CLE all the way! We love it for our 2nd grader and 4th grader (we are almost finished with our school year) ... we have recently started our child who is lower functioning/autistic with it, as well.  I love CLE! (We've used other curriculum and had lots of trouble with retention before starting this program).

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My oldest used Math Mammoth, then Singapore for elementary math. He used AoPS Prealgebra and is starting Jacobs Algebra next week. Next kid did Singapore K-1, then CLE 2-3 so far. He'll continue with CLE until he's ready for Prealgebra. He'll likely use AoPS. Third kid did Singapore K, then started CLE 1-2. He'll likewise continue with CLE for elementary math.

 

#4 has a long time before she starts math, but I'll likely use CLE with her also. I really like it. There is a short new instruction, then practice done independently. Speed drills are built in. Kid #3 is very independent, so I love that the new teaching is written to the student. While I go over major new topics (such as addition with regrouping), if the new topic is just a couple new math facts or something fairly simple, he can learn it himself. He prefers to work that way, and it works for him.

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I have my fourth child in Singapore/Miquon and he's starting Beast soon. My teenagers use AoPS. My daughter is finishing Singapore and will start AoPS soon - she's the only one that has detoured some and done a little MEP.

 

I've never used the hig for SM. I teach - if the topic is easy, I let them do fewer problems. (My daughter needs more practice and thus does MEP as well.)

 

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I have one doing just MUS.

 

One is doing Singapore Standards, Beast Academy, Khan Academy, and Competitive Math.  Not all at the same time.  

 

My youngest two boys are using just MUS right now, but they will be transitioning to Singapore in the Fall...and they will probably also use some MUS as an introduction.  

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I just moved it to my first post, I figured it would be more likely to be seen.

 

I think CLE and study time are probably similar?

 

I'm not familiar with Study Time. From the samples I can see that the layout is very different (way too crowded for most of my kids), but I can't compare the programs beyond that.

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I started Ds with Right Start and it worked perfect for him, until it didn't so he moved onto Beast Academy and has since done a hodge podge of BA, Horizons, CLE and various other things. The plan next year is for MM+BA.

 

DD hated RS and Miquon and several other things but loved MiF and then Horizons(now on Horizons 3).

 

Dd2 is just starting and I'm doing MiF with her, I thought it would be a good fit for her and it has been so far, she might switch to Horizons at some point or BA, not sure yet.

 

We're still figuring out the how to it here, I've just added my 3rd student this year. Last year I started doing a math hour and have everyone work on math at the same time, going back and forth as needed and that is what I'm doing this summer when we do math as well. I start with dd2 as she needs be to be right there the whole time. Dd1 is very good working on her own and just needs me for little bits here and there and I can usually do that in between working with someone else (partly her personality and partly the spiral and incremental nature of Horizons-its perfect for her), ds, well working on his own is not his strong suite, so after I finish with dd1 and dd2 then I go over and work with ds. He did ok doing CLE as review mostly on his own but I don't personally like it so we're going to try MM this year as it is written to the student as well. I'm hoping that it will have enough direction that he can at least get started on his own while I work with others, fingers crossed.

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I don't think it is the curriculum that matters as much as time management and mastering a familial flow. Learning how to teach one and having that child being disciplined enough to sit quietly and work independently or wait quietly with their questions without interrupting while I work with another child is the biggest hurdle. The kids learn to move on the questions they can answer without my help and then when I am available ask for assistance. If they can't do any more independently without help, they read another assignment, etc.

I agree with this completely (and I'm only schooling three as of yet). At my house, each child gets a block of time with me, and when it's not their block, they work on whatever they can do independently. When it's time for each child's block, I do whatever stuff with that child that I need to. Math is always part of it, and there are languages, etc. too.

 

Fwiw, I use Saxon with one child, Singapore with a second, and MEP with a third because those are the ones that fit them well. With the Singapore, I glance over the HIG and then teach the lesson using the Textbook. We do practice problems from the Textbook. Sometimes there is Mental Math from the HIG that we do before the Textbook. We skip the Workbook completely. I assign him some pages of the Intensive Practice to do on his own, although if we have time, he might do them orally. This makes the juggling much easier.

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I don't think it is the curriculum that matters as much as time management and mastering a familial flow. Learning how to teach one and having that child being disciplined enough to sit quietly and work independently or wait quietly with their questions without interrupting while I work with another child is the biggest hurdle. The kids learn to move on the questions they can answer without my help and then when I am available ask for assistance. If they can't do any more independently without help, they read another assignment, etc.

 

This.

 

We use Singapore through 6B, followed by AOPS for PreAlgebra and up. We do Singapore's mental math selectively (daily would be serious overkill for us), and we do the CWP in one big swoop at the end of each level so we don't have to juggle so many different books all at once. 

 

Currently, I have a schedule that staggers math and piano practice, so the kid I'm working with can have my full attention. I start kid#2 on Singapore while #3 is practicing piano. Then once #2 is settled into his assignment, I work one-on-one with #4 (while still available for questions from #2). Then we switch, and #2 practices piano while #3 comes to do math (#4 can write in his journal independently during this time). My oldest works independently on AOPS, and we have a set time to go over her math a little later in the day. Our routine works for us. Everyone has been taught to go on to something they can do independently if they are ready for me to check their work, but I'm not yet ready to help them.

 

Really, the curriculum you use doesn't matter as much as establishing discipline and finding a routine that works for your own family.

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IMO if you skip the HIG you are missing what makes Singapore a strong and effective math program. This isn't as true in level 5 and somewhat in 4, but it is especially true in 1-3. Your student may cruise along without having the conceptual lessons from the HIG until one day they hit a road block because they don't have the conceptual foundation. If you aren't teaching Singapore there's not much point in using it over any other program. It does require mom time.

 

Math in the early years takes lots of mom time. Lots. But if you build a solid foundation in the early elementary years your students can develop into more independent math students. I feel the same about phonics/reading/spelling - heavy upfront investment reaps greater educational (and mom-time) dividends.

 

By building a solid foundation in RS and Singapore my oldest is 95% independent in AOPS classes, my son worked about 60-75% independently in Beast Academy, and my middle daughter is working towards greater independence starting Beast Academy.

 

But I completely understand how difficult it is to spread yourself over multiple children's lessons. AOPS/ Beast Academy, Life of Fred, Teaching Textbooks, and Math a Mammoth are all less teacher intensive. I don't think they are all equal in rigor. Beast Academy has been rigorous and so well designed that my students need me mainly for consultation, but my son has outpaced the publication of levels and is going to Singapore 5 in the fall - I know it's an excellent choice, but I also know he will need more from me than he did last year in BA.

 

Best Wishes!

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I'm not looking to push my kids into algebra in 7th grade and get them through calculus during high school. So I ask myself why I'm using a math curriculum that people who have those types of goals use?

 

I didn't vote in the poll because I only have two kids.  But I used Singapore because it develops the mathematical thinking skills that I want my kids to have, and it does so brilliantly.  My choice of Singapore had nothing to do with goals for the timing of particular high school math courses.

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