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Books/Resource on how to raise/teach a "gifted" child


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We sometimes have a hard time with music here and I have just decided to lay off. It comes in spurts...too few for my liking but I know it won't work if I pushed it.

Music is another comedy in my home. I think I have at least an instrument in every family of the orchestra except brass. I have been eyeing a trombone.

 

Art is actually another area that is difficult. How much mentorship should we as parents look for if our kids do not express any interest to be artist but would like to draw better and has the ability to do so. One is good at still life, the other at drawing comic strips.

 

Music comes under stress therapy in my budget :)

That's how I justify the cost of instruments and lessons. Art would come under that category too for us.

 

Have you read about Abigail Sin? She is so talented and yet so grounded. She is 23 now and doing her PhD in London Academy of Music. She rejected Julliard at 15.

 

This part of an article on her made me laugh in a good way.

 

"an exchange programme with the Peabody Institute in Baltimore in the US at age 15, "the older kids never let me see them drunk", she says. They made it a point to walk her to the dormitory daily after dinner."

 

ETA:

Pottery and glass sculpture would be something that we would pay for when they are older as they have the interest and that's very difficult to self learn.

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I am completely unschooling art. This was my own experience growing up and based on DS's personality I know this is the right thing for him. No regrets or second guessing at all which is rare for me. If I had tried art instruction we would have both stopped talking to each other. I know that would have happened due to how perfectionist I can be with art. Instead I allowed him to experiment in his own time and he is developing a delightful style. I love it (warts and all, hee hee, see, I still can't get away from needing it to be perfect). It really showcases HIS personality without some art teacher or me influencing his style. This is just my opinion for my kid and not dissing art tutoring or art classes. At least in this one thing I have a lot of confidence about what's right for the boy.

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/snip

I disliked that she used IQ to justify everything from demanding that they improve every aspect of their cello playing at the same time, to not being able to perform basic self care tasks.

 

 \snip

 

Hmm...I've seen, heard and read instances where a few mothers attribute every flicker on their child's face to giftedness. But that's another topic for another day.

 

Thanks for taking the time to post a review. :001_smile:

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  • 2 weeks later...

Living with Intensity: Understanding the Sensitivity, Excitability, and the Emotional Development of Gifted Children, Adolescents and Adults

 

This was a great book. It's a collection of essays basically, some were a lot more relatable then others. I would highly recommend it. Lots of "Aha!" moments. :)

 

 

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Speaking of "Aha"s, this isn't about giftedness, it's a general parenting book, but I've been really enjoying the "Aha Parenting" book called Peaceful Parents, Happy Kids by Laura Markham. It's all about regulating yourself, and your kids' behavior will follow suit. I've been struggling with two tick-borne illnesses the past year or so, and let's just say they've not brought out my best behavior. In fact, they've exacerbated some of my less pleasing qualities. It's been hard to accept my own overexcitabilities and figure out what my triggers are and how that affects interactions with my child. I've been having lots more honest conversations with myself (heehee) and my child. Admitting that we both have problems with the same factor X, so we have to work double hard on them has been extremely helpful to both of us. I know we all carry around lots of baggage from our own experiences growing up, and it's interesting to pull apart how that clouds our perceptions of our children.

 

I need to figure out how to make violin practice more playful and fun for my DD. Unfortunately that's when MY perfectionist tendencies come out and I'm working on how to let that go, since I am her teacher at home. She may well throw her violin at me one day :)

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The Spark by Kristine Barnett is a darn good book by any measure, but the narrative of raising her "autistic" and outrageously gifted son Jacob Barnett would likely be particularly useful to you.

Just finished reading this book at the library. Going to forward the title to my friend with an autistic child.

 

If anyone is in the SF Bay Area, the book is at a Palo Alto library.

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