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My nephew has been living with us for a little over 2 months now. Working with a tutor 20 hours a week. This tutor is only available another few weeks and I will need to replace him at least through the summer.

 

Next year I hope to still have some tutoring help, but probably not so many hours...maybe half?

 

Homeschooling my 3 and managing thier activities takes all of my time...

 

My nephew came to me about 5 years behind in academics.

 

Currently he is working through lials basic college math, how to teach spelling, jump in writing, and apologia general science.

 

At the end of summer he will still be nowhere near grade level...but I am at a bit of a loss as to how to continue...

 

Can he actually graduate?

 

State law requires 4 math including algebra 1 and geometry

Could this year and next year be math fundamentals hoping to be able to do algebra 1 in 11th and geometry in 12th? I am thinking to start teaching textbook pre algebra next year and then go through to algebra 1 as soon as he finishes. Of course that depends on if after the summer he is ready for pre algebra...

 

Need 4 years of English focusing on lit and composition.

We are doing what we can to get through this year...

What about the remedial grammar and writing classes with WTM academy for next year? Would those work to bridge the gap some? Can a high schooler take those? Is there something better for him?

 

Maybe SL 100? I think he could handle those books...they don't look intimidating. There is History, Bible, and lit.

 

 

This is really hard for me. I am not a bare minimum person, but I am having to think that way? I feel a little like we are cheating, but honestly he would have to work really hard to accomplish tasks such as teaching textbooks algebra 1 in a year...he is that behind.

 

He will do science and a foreign language and an elective just not sure what....or how... :lol:

 

Am I crazy?

 

Way off here? Hallucinating??? :lol:

 

Any help is welcome...

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After he finishes BCM he might even be ready for algebra given his older age. Give him the placement test to make sure.

If he finished it...maybe. However, I doubt at the pace he is moving he will finish it before we run our of "tutor time" ....just thinking a switch to something more independent will help? I don't have the time to sit and hold his hand every day...

 

Ugh I feel horrible even saying that. But truly I need to delegate and facilitate his homeschooling at this point-- not be a direct educator.

 

I feel like an awful person saying that. I feel like I am saying I don't have time for him...but that's not exactly what I'm saying-- I just dont have more time period. :'(

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Is something like AGS textbooks out the question for you?  I know with my special learner I dream about continuing my CM and Classical approach, but might adjust too.  here's a link to catalog of what I'm talking about, and you can search by "age level" mixed with "lower reading levels".  There's "foundational" vs "alternative" texts.   look at the pdf catalog for more info on that.   but it's high school content just at lower reading level.

http://www.wiesereducational.com/

 

it's a different approach on it that. I'm not sure how independent it will be for him to use.  but wanted to toss that idea there for remedial help.

 

 

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Is he a willing student? Are there LD's? Could you meet with a public school guidance counselor and see what kind of plan they would set up for him if he were to go to school, and follow a similar plan? Could he go to public school? Could he do a virtual school? What does he want to do? Sorry to have only questions for you rather than answers, but these are the questions I would be asking myself in your situation. I mean this only kindly, but if you don't have time to homeschool him, then why not send him to school?

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Is he a willing student? Are there LD's? Could you meet with a public school guidance counselor and see what kind of plan they would set up for him if he were to go to school, and follow a similar plan? Could he go to public school? Could he do a virtual school? What does he want to do? Sorry to have only questions for you rather than answers, but these are the questions I would be asking myself in your situation. I mean this only kindly, but if you don't have time to homeschool him, then why not send him to school?

He is way too far behind to go to school. They have alternative learning schools that could help him if he were only 3 years behind...but he is 5 years behind...

 

Virtual school is also out of the question because of the same reason.

 

If we could get him closer to grade level by the end of next year we might consider b&m school for junior and senior year.

 

I don't have time to hand hold...he is very far behind and requires significantly more help than my 9 yo. If I helped him the way I would like to right now/how he needs, I would have no time for my other children. This is why we have a tutor working with him. :)

 

He is willing, but not very motivated...

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If he finished it...maybe. However, I doubt at the pace he is moving he will finish it before we run our of "tutor time" ....just thinking a switch to something more independent will help? I don't have the time to sit and hold his hand every day...

 

Ugh I feel horrible even saying that. But truly I need to delegate and facilitate his homeschooling at this point-- not be a direct educator.

 

I feel like an awful person saying that. I feel like I am saying I don't have time for him...but that's not exactly what I'm saying-- I just dont have more time period. :'(

 

Math Rescue?

 

Don't feel bad. I think most of us switch from educator to facilitator at some point in our kids' education. 

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How old is he? Why does he have to graduate in two years? And yes you are going to have to find some time for him or find someone else to give him time. HIghschool is not hands off. :grouphug: :grouphug: :grouphug:

He is 15. Held back in K so would be in 9th grade this year. He would graduate in 3 more years...I am trying to work through a plan that I can oversee and a tutor can work with him about 10 hours a week to accomplish. I need plans he can work under my supervision, but being checked by online classes and the tutor....

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Do a placement test into TT when you run out of tutor time. You may be surprised. My kids both placed 2 levels ahead of their actual level in TT when we tried a placement test. Ds placed into Algebra in 6th grade when the reality was we did 3 more years of math before he was ready for Algebra (we didn't use TT). 

 

I wouldn't try to do any classical writing with him. It is very hard to launch into at such a late age.

 

SL Core 100 sounds like a great choice. It is really middle school level, but they have always labeled it as high school and you could give the credits. It includes a full English credit, but what about adding Write at Home? It is know for being a reasonable workload, but it gets very consistently good reviews. 

 

So, if he can do SL Bible, History, and LA, TT math (or continue BCM with your new tutor until he is ready for Algebra), Could he go on to Apologia Physical Science? It isn't much tougher than general. They say it can be 8th or 9th and I've always said 8th, but in this case, I'd use it as a high school credit.

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Do a placement test into TT when you run out of tutor time. You may be surprised. My kids both placed 2 levels ahead of their actual level in TT when we tried a placement test. Ds placed into Algebra in 6th grade when the reality was we did 3 more years of math before he was ready for Algebra (we didn't use TT).

 

I wouldn't try to do any classical writing with him. It is very hard to launch into at such a late age.

 

SL Core 100 sounds like a great choice. It is really middle school level, but they have always labeled it as high school and you could give the credits. It includes a full English credit, but what about adding Write at Home? It is know for being a reasonable workload, but it gets very consistently good reviews.

 

So, if he can do SL Bible, History, and LA, TT math (or continue BCM with your new tutor until he is ready for Algebra), Could he go on to Apologia Physical Science? It isn't much tougher than general. They say it can be 8th or 9th and I've always said 8th, but in this case, I'd use it as a high school credit.

I had forgotten about write at home. I will look into that. Yes, I was thinking of Apologia Physical science followed by biology the following year.

 

I will definitely do a placement test.

 

Thanks! :)

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Does your state allow Prealgebra to count for HS credit? BCM is basically Prealgebra; you could probably switch him to TT Prealgebra now if you want him to be more independent. If he does Algebra 1 in 10th, and Geometry in 11th, he could do Consumer Math in 12th. TT only has ~120 lessons per level and they are short lessons with pretty simple, straightforward problems (no complicated word problems), so it might not be that hard for him to catch up, especially if he works through the summers. 

 

For English, I would really just focus on basic reading, writing, and spelling, and read some lighter, contemporary novels. Does he like science fiction? Graphic novels? There are actually some good resources for using graphic novels to teach basic literary analysis. Maybe IEW would help with writing simple essays. FWIW, my niece, who was in PS Honors English classes in 8th & 9th, never wrote a single essay. She did a few power points, though.  :001_rolleyes:

 

History and science can be git-er-done subjects. Lots of documentaries, simple experiments, and a very basic text. How many credits of each does your state require?

 

Does he really need foreign language? If he's not headed to college (or plans to go to a CC first) and it's not a state requirement, I'd be inclined to skip it.

 

Maybe fill the elective slots with practical subjects? Intro to Computers, Career Exploration, Work Study?

 

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If at all possible I'd finish BCM before changing maths, assuming he is doing well. It really reviews EVERYTHING from arithmetic. Were you getting a new tutor? I would have this as priority with the new tutor until he finishes that, then switch to TT to free up tutor time for other subjects. I really think he might be ready for TT algebra after BCM (although of course I would do the placement test). I am not aware of anything like TT that is designed for older, remedial students -- the grade-level TT will simply move too slowly for someone who is behind due to lack of instruction rather than due to inability to follow instruction.

 

As far as "cheating" -- b.s. He is in high school and doing the best work he is capable of at this point in his life, therefore, it is high school work.

 

I would honestly skip foreign language of any sort until he is closer to on-level with english and math. Even if the state requires two years he can do those in 11th and 12th grade and even there I'd have absolutely no compunction about using something really more aimed at younger students.

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Is his reading level behind, too, as well as his math?  If so, that could be part of why BCM is taking so long - too many words!   If reading level is an issue, you could look at the Walch Power Basics series.  They are high school texts written at a lower reading level and are much simpler than regular texts.   

 

 

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I don't recommend SL Core 100. The books are the right level but the IG is way too wordy (notes and questions) and the reading is too many pages per day for any student who doesn't really love it. It will take up too much of his day to get it all done. I used it with a remedial student who was far ahead of your nephew but it was still a bit much....

 

If SL's worldview is OK, what about Notgrass? Dry, but the lit choices are interesting, and the layout and expectations are so much simpler.

 

Would this work, with your oversight and help from a tutor?

First, bring up the math to be ready for pre-Algebra, hopefully by fall 2015. Then begin a 3 yr plan:

Year 1
Notgrass US History and Lit
TT Pre-Algebra
Physical Science

Year 2
Notgrass World History and Lit
TT Algebra
Biology

Year 3
Notgrass Government and Econ
TT Geometry
Chemistry

He will still need foreign language (Duolingo, or Mango if your library has it), health, some intro to computers, PE, and something open and go for English...

I understand what you are saying about virtual schools and ps. When I researched for severely delayed hs students of my acquaintance, I found the same thing -- if they are too far behind they can't be folded in. :( The principal at one high school told me that the only option would be special ed classes that would be harmful to him and to the other students emotionally. Kids really can miss the bus. It's so hard.

 

I think the core options I mentioned are very do-the-next-thing, that he could do at the kitchen table while you are overseeing all the children, and his tutor could help him over rough patches in math and science. Maybe?


 

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While all of those programs are weak high school programs, they are high school programs. There are plenty of kids in ps that are taking the remedial or most basic classes offered and they get a diploma. It isn't ideal, but for his age and skills, I think every step forward you can take with him is just that much.

 

I could see a three year plan that looks like:

This year:

History - SL

LA - SL + Write at Home

Bible - SL

Math - TT (Algebra hopefully)

Science - Apologia Physical

 

Next year:

History - Notgrass World

LA - EIL Intro to Lit, continue Write at Home if needed

Math - TT Geometry (algebra if he can't do it this year)

Science - Apologia Biology

Personal Finance - MUS could be good here

 

Senior Year:

History - Notgrass Government/Economics

LA - EIL American Lit/Write at Home if needed

Math - TT Algebra 2 if he has gotten there, finish Geometry if not

Science - Apologia Marine Biology or even Chemistry if he has grown enough to be ready by then

Elective of his choice

 

All of that is very basic, particularly for the years he would do it. It would give him 2-3 credits of math (depending on where he starts this year), 3 credits of history, 3 credits of science, 3 credits of English. You could potentially add another credit of English by doing a full writing class + EIL one year so that he'd get 4 credits of English. Come up with some electives based on interest and he can do this.

 

 

Tibbie posted while I was writing and it is amazing how similar our ideas are :)

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As if that post wasn't long enough, I forgot to say: My focus on electives would have to do with study skills, self sufficiency, and confidence in daily life stuff. He needs to go forth as a young man who feels good about himself in spite of these academic challenges and family struggles he's endured...I'd be looking to keep a light in his eyes, whether through martial arts or a job or clubs...even more important than getting through geometry and chemistry by a certain date. As his very loving aunt who is doing more for him than anyone, I know you know these things. Just saying them aloud in case it helps to support you right now.

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Great advice above!

 

 Apologia has audiobooks for the textbooks.  Those might make things a little bit easier if he is not a strong reader.

 

Also, you might want to consider WWS 1, 2, and 3 as the writing portion for English.  (My ds is not a strong writer, so he is working through WWS 1 now as a 10th grader and because he is doing well he will skip to WWS 3 next year.)  I know that these are not *usually* used for high school, but it has worked for us to get him closer to grade level in writing.

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Great advice above!

 

Apologia has audiobooks for the textbooks. Those might make things a little bit easier if he is not a strong reader.

 

Also, you might want to consider WWS 1, 2, and 3 as the writing portion for English. (My ds is not a strong writer, so he is working through WWS 1 now as a 10th grader and because he is doing well he will skip to WWS 3 next year.) I know that these are not *usually* used for high school, but it has worked for us to get him closer to grade level in writing.

I had considered WWS the online class but then thought he might not be able to handle that which is why I was considering the WTM remedial class ...

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As if that post wasn't long enough, I forgot to say: My focus on electives would have to do with study skills, self sufficiency, and confidence in daily life stuff. He needs to go forth as a young man who feels good about himself in spite of these academic challenges and family struggles he's endured...I'd be looking to keep a light in his eyes, whether through martial arts or a job or clubs...even more important than getting through geometry and chemistry by a certain date. As his very loving aunt who is doing more for him than anyone, I know you know these things. Just saying them aloud in case it helps to support you right now.

Yes! He will probably start a part time job this summer or at least part time volunteering. He needs to get out of the house and develop a passion for something besides his computer.

 

We are trying so hard to help him see that he is where he is because of sucky circumstances beyond his control and now he has opportunities in front of him...

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*  *  *  *  * ETA

Oh Dear! So many posts got added to this thread while I was thinking and typing, so I don't think my post is terribly relevant now.

 

I will say that I would focus on vocational-tech readiness as a VERY realistic path for nephew if he has any interests in that area. That would allow you to incorporate some dual enrollment in 11th and 12th grades, which would take the burden off of you for some courses -- and it would allow nephew to be simultaneously working ahead on a 1-year certificate or an AAS degree.

 

CyndiLJ of this board has adopted children with delays and remedial needs and has a super website: Blue Collar Homeschool. There is a great section with ideas for curriculum that would likely be a good fit for you.  :)

 

Literature and Writing programs  -- some good ideas in here that might be a good fit for your nephew!

Math programs

Science programs -- some good ideas in here that might be a good fit for your nephew!

History programs

Elective programs -- some great suggestions for elective possibilities!

 

*  *  *  *  *

 

 

Just my thoughts, FWIW:

 

1.  :hurray:  :hurray: Wow! Good job!

Awesome and generous of you to take on this new student and new family member unexpectedly! Give yourself some credit for diving into uncharted waters and doing such a great job of coming up with resources and assessing your situation in such a short period of time! :)

 

Some questions I have, and answers would help with advice-giving ;):

 

- age of this young man? and grade?

(I'm guessing from your wording about math of "this year and next… and then 11th and 12th" -- that this is 9th grade for nephew? Even is nephew is 15yo right now, I'd very seriously consider calling this year 8th and give him the extra year he needs to catch up)

 

- you mention "remedial" -- are there diagnosed LDs? do you need to look into getting a diagnosis?

- or is remedial due to neglect?

- or is remedial due to lack of interest/work on nephew's part?

 

- what is nephew's reading level? his interest/lack of interest in reading? genres or subjects (if any) he likes to read about?

(knowing this will help point toward or away from certain types of curricula)

 

- what is nephew's interest in science? history? other school subjects?

(again, knowing this will help point towards "get 'er done" programs, or programs that allow for depth)

 

- what are your state's requirements for homeschool high school?

(many states do not require homeschoolers to complete a specific course of study -- that will give you more flexibility in planning credits that will help nephew for what he wants to do post-high school)

 

- what are nephew's personal goals -- educationally, career-wise, or future interests?

(knowing this will help you get his buy-in for taking an extra year and for completing coursework that will be pre-requisite to getting to his goal; consider looking through the programs offered at your local community college or vocational-tech schools and see what he is interested in)

 

 

2. be realistic

Hard moment here: realistically, nephew is at an extremely critical moment here. You've done a fabulous job getting him rolling with a tutor (20 hours a week is fabulous!). But you know that you will not have that much help next year. And realistically for next year, nephew is NOT going to be as caught up as you would wish, or as independently-working as you would wish.

 

JMO, but next year absolutely needs to be about nephew to get him caught up and independent. The sooner he is in that place, the sooner you "get your life back" and have the time to spend on your youngers again. However, getting nephew to that point is realistically going to take most of next year. That means next year will need to be a year of sacrifice for you and your children. It will likely mean cutting out the extracurriculars (or cutting them back to just once a week) for a year. It also will mean cutting back your school schedule with your 3 youngers to scheduling just the "3Rs" or basics, and then once a week enjoy some informal History, Science, and Art.

 

Your signature shows you have young ones (ages 9, 7, 5). In the grand scheme of life, stopping gymnastics and co-op and Science, or whatever for a year, and not going as deep in History for a year is not going to ruin them. :)

 

I will be very bold here -- and please dismiss this if this is inappropriate or does not fit for you -- but from your linked blog, it looks like you are a Christian. I would suggest that perhaps this is your opportunity to consider this next year of sacrifice as a gift to your nephew and a fragrant offering to the Lord. And realize that there are some spiritual lessons and life lessons that your children are having the opportunity to learn in this next year that may not come again. The opportunity to see that people are more important than scheduled activities. That coming alongside someone in need is often not a "one-and-done", but is a daily choice -- that ultimately not only helps that person, but transforms us, as we are willing to sacrifice, into a more Christ-like person. That is is hard to stand against the tide of culture, when part of us would really rather be doing what's personally interesting or easy or what everyone else is doing. Just a thought. Please discard if not pertinent or helpful.

 

So, back to being realistic. ;) Meaning this gently, and not at all judging -- only you know yourself and your limits and how to balance your family's needs -- If you do not have the time/ability to make time for the one-on-one that nephew will need next year, and if 10 hours of tutoring a week is not going to be enough to do it, then what will be the other options for nephew? Is there another family member better able to meet nephew's needs, or who can step in with physical helps, or can contribute towards tutoring, or has resources for helping nephew? Is there a good remedial local high school program available? Can someone else homeschool him? Is nephew able to handle some school in a school setting so that a university model might work (3 days/week at a school, 2 days/week at home) -- so you can focus on nephew 2 days a week and on your youngers 3 days/week? As Space Station posted above, what about the public school or a charter -- that could give you time for your youngers, and then when nephew is home from school you could focus on him.

 

 

3. getting nephew up to speed

If you can call THIS year 8th grade, that gives you breathing room. If you must call this year 9th grade, depending on nephew's abilities and willingness (and whether or not there are LDs), yes, I think you can still make this happen.

 

Without knowing specifically what credits you may be required as a homeschooler to accomplish, I'd suggest this is a typical basic list of credits for graduation, and would also be the minimum for future university admissions, depending on the school:

 

4 credits = English

4 credits = Math (up through Algebra, Geometry)

3 credits = Science

2-3 credits = Social Science (1.0 = American History, 0.5 = Gov't, 0.5 = Econ …)

2 credits = Foreign Language

1 credit = Fine Arts

4? credits = Electives (Computer? PE? Health? Driver's Ed? -- I'd look into vocational-tech classes via dual enrollment that will also count towards a certificate or Associate's degree that will help after high school graduation)

 

Overall, I'd suggest that the plan for this next year is

1. focus on getting solid in the basics (reading, writing, math)

2. work on building some study skills habits and foundational skills for being able to self-learn

3. work on just a minimum of credits:

- English = 1.0 credit

- Math = 1.0 credit

- Science = 0.5 to 1.0 credit

- History = 0.5 to 1.0 credit

- Fine Arts or an Elective of his interest = 1.0 credit (allow him what will help kindle a little joy, or nurture a personal interest -- PE, Computer, Music, Art, Blacksmithing… :) )

 

English

Get solid in reading and writing. What level of reading is he at -- late elementary? middle school? at-grade level? Does he like to read? If so what?

 

No, I wouldn't try for any online class next year. So I'd cross off WTM Academy for next year. Online classes require yet another whole layer of skills and nephew is not ready for that yet. I think you would end up having to spend MUCH more time helping him get through an online class than you have available to you.

 

If he is not a big reader, I wouldn't do SL. Also, SL is very teacher-intensive, and NOT very solo-based unless you have a strong reader and motivated student. Things that could work:

 

- Essentials in Writing

by grade level; DVD-lessons; can be done somewhat solo; if he is behind, I'd suggest looking at grade 6 or grade 7 as your starting point -- see a sample of the student book (it has the table of contents in it, so you can see an overview of what the course covers), and also a sample of the weekly video lesson

 

- Alpha-Omega Life Pacs (workbooks) or Switched on Schoolhouse (CD version)

by grade level, and by subject, so you could see if this might be the way to go for Literature, History, or Science as a "get 'er done" box checking way scope and sequence

 

Math

Teaching Textbooks sounds like a solid option. Work with him where he is. Do not rush. Make sure to get absolutely solid in the foundational topics -- the 4 basic functions, fractions, decimals, percents, positive/negative numbers, etc. -- before moving on to Algebra. Otherwise, it really will bite you down the line.

 

 

Again, if you can let us know about his interests and strengths, whether or not he likes to read or if reading is hard, his weaknesses, and grade level of work in things like History and Science, it will be easier to commend things to you, esp. things that are more solo-based, or that play to his strengths. :)

 

Wishing you ALL the best and every success! You are doing a wonderful thing for this young man! Warmest regards, Lori D.

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As a previous poster mentioned, does your state require homeschoolers to follow the same requirements for graduation as public schools? That is important to know. Here in FL, there are graduation requirements for public schoolers, but nothing in the law requires home schoolers to follow those. Now, some do because they believe it will help their child get into college or other reasons.  However, it is not a requirement.

 

I would look into that first. It could save you some stress.

 

I second the suggestion for the Walch Pulications. Also consider Paradigm Accelerated Curriculum.  

 

If you are not required by law to follow the state graduation guidelines, what about something like American School of Correspondence?  He could do the General Diploma program which I believe includes some general math instruction.  That might be a good option for him.  I think they only send one or two courses at a time, so it could be less overwhelming.  

 

 

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He sounds a lot like my son, who is now 17yo and in 11th grade. My son will take a 5th year of highschool. 

 

My son has always been homeschooled, but has dyslexia, which is the reason he'll not graduate until after that 5th year of highschool. 

 

My son's 9th grade year was spent remedial work in math, spelling, reading and writing (simple paragraphs for the writing). He did earn extra curricular credits that year doing things he enjoyed (guitar, PE-homeschool track and cross country and current events credit). Watch for what he's spending his free time doing, then decide at the end of the school year if he's spent enough time doing the activity to earn a 1/2 credit for it. 

 

Also, I think another poster mentioned having him do something NOT school related that makes him feel good as a person. Whether that be a sport (organized or not...like just lifting weights on a regular basis or running in 5k races, etc...) or a part-time job or time spent volunteering. 

 

Your nephew sounds a LOT like my now 17yo ds, who is currently an 11th grade BUT will take a 5th year of highschool  (so he'll be 19 1/2 when he graduates). The BEST thing to happen to my ds was his part-time job. But for your nephew it could be a sport or being a volunteer somewhere. My ds is also a regular volunteer at our church food pantry 2 evenings a week for 3 hours. This is a very close 2nd to the job as being a life/attitude changer for him. These young men of ours NEED to feel important and useful to the world. 

 

Here's what I suggest for your nephew (based on what we've done or plan to do) after he finishes the courses:

 

10th

-Math: TT pre-Alg.

-Writing: IEW SWI-B (we've had amazing success with IEW)...but I would go SLOWLY taking 2 years to do SWI-B. 

-Literature:Just let him read, read, read along with audio. Then have him orally narrate to you. Encourage him to choose his own books to read out of a pile that you have chosen for him. Don't make it follow his history. Just make interesting choices: The Giver, Adventures of Tom Sawyer (audio at librivox.com), Of Mice and Men, The Outsiders are a few of my son's favorites that are shorter, easier reads that appeal to most teen boys.

-Science: Apologia Physical (I'd keep this LIGHT. Do the first module with him and teach him to take notes while reading, then let the tests be open notes.)

-History: Story of the World vol. 4. Just have him read and orally narrate to you. Count this as a Modern History 1/2 credit. He'll learn some history AND build his reading skills). 

 

11th:

-Math: TT Alg. 1

-Writing: continue SWI-B

-Literature: Continue what you were doing in 10th grade, but add a few written book critiques once he covers this in the IEW SWI-B. 

-Science: Apologia Biology (continue with the open notes tests...have him only do a few labs).

-History: Notgrass American....my ds is using this, but he does only the textbook readings and questions. We've not followed the literature or the American Voices readings). 

 

12th

-Math: TT Alg. 2

-Writing: IEW's continuation course

-Lit: continue just reading classics along with audio if he still needs it and the informal discussions with you over dinner a few nights a week:)

-Government/Econ: Notgrass and a few of the Uncle Eric books (Are you are Liberal, Conservative or Confused/Whatever Happened to Penny Candy and maybe one or two more...my older ds LOVED these books)

-Science: Georgia Public Broadcasting Chem or Apologia Chem OR DIVE Integrated Chem and Physics using Abeka's textbook

 

5th year @ CC

-Math: TT Geometry 

-English: English Comp I & II @ CC 

-History: Steams of Civilizations I and II w/ The Universe Next Door (my older son read this and loved it!) and maybe a few more of the Uncle Eric books

-Science: not sure...probably Georgia Public Broadcasting Physics OR if I use DIVE the year before, then we'll just continue with DIVE Chemistry

 

 

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Our schools do Pre-Algebra, Algebra 1a, Geometry, Algebra 1b for kids needing the slower math track. You could use programs like "Keys to Algebra" or "Understanding Geometry" or something from Walch power basics or AGS or perhaps teaching textbooks or MUS. Call the class what you need to to meet state requirements, but teach him where he's at.

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The non-college prep or general path here in Michigan is typically:

 

pre-algebra 9th grade

algebra 1 10th grade

geometry 11th grade

and either a course at the tech center which requires the use of mathematics such as metal working, auto mechanics, nurse's aid, EMT school, etc. and is then counted as a fourth math or business math which is a very nice, practical subject.

 

English 1 - 4, this is not honors level nor college prep...basic, but does include some literature studies - a few novels, poems, and plays each year - and works its way up to a little essay writing the senior year, but has an emphasis on some business writing - memos, briefs, summaries, business letters... Since he needs remediation in spelling, you can just roll that into the English studies without worries. Easy Grammar and Editor in Chief come to mind as good options.

 

American History - not honors level...nuts and bolts, some writing but not much. Mostly multiple choice and fill in the blank tests.

 

World History - the same format.

 

American Government and Economics - this class is just nuts and bolts, fairly easy for everyone that isn't in a position to get it as an AP. It's a state requirement, and for those in the Honors/College Prep American History classes, much of the material was actually covered before since the Econ in particular is very sketchy. So, I think you could really go light on this and not hurt your nephew unless he was wanting to major in History or something related in college.

 

Physical Science

Biology - not honors or AP so heavier than Apologia Life Science but not containing much bio chemistry and light on A & P

Elective - many students take agricultural, vet tech science, or nurse's aide at the tech center for their third science. You could use Conceptual Chemistry or Conceptual Physics for a third if that is required in your state. These courses are very, very introductory and light on math.

Another option in science would be a health/nutrition course...very practical.

 

That leaves foreign language and electives. I don't know if foreign language is required in your state. Here it is for the college prep diploma (merit curriculum) but not for remedial or general studies. You'll need to check that out. If it is required and you only need one year, since he's so far behind in the core, I would suggest a couple of levels of Rosetta Stone and some basic workbooks from Amazon, Spanish probably. The pronunciation of French and German is generally harder for a lot of kids. I am not a fan of Rosetta Stone as a stand alone for the lack of writing and grammar, but there are some simple workbooks on basic sentence structure out there so combined with the conversational, vocabulary component, enough to award a credit of Introductory Spanish.

 

if he likes computers, you could pull together a Business Computer credit or two. You can do this either by having him take four community adult education courses on Microsoft Office products, QuickBooks accounting software, etc. or cobbling it together with some end user books on each product and assign him to maybe make some brochures and business cards using Publisher, produce business letters on Word, create some spreadsheets for things like the household budget in Excel, etc. Being able to work with these programs is a positive for future employment.

 

Fine Arts - if he must absolutely have a fine arts credit - I would either do something like Sister Wendy Videos with discussions and note taking followed by a Great Courses series such as "How to Look at and Understand Great Art" or you can go with Art Appreciation boxed curriculum like Alpha Omega which covers really basic drawing and painting topics and is very easy to complete.

 

Without foreign language, four maths, four English, three science, three social studies gives him fourteen credits, add on a business computer credit and a general fine arts credit that is 16, and if you can put a personal fitness plan in place where he logs his exercise - we had "gym" five days per week in high school but by the time everyone changed, then we were dismissed to change after, plus had announcements and general lecturing on health topics from the PE teacher, we actually only exercised or played a sports scrimmage for about 30 minutes. So he could maybe accumulate a credit for that as well getting his total to 17. That leaves an elective or two, maybe more, depending on your state requirements.

 

Another option would be getting him up to GED level, sit the exam, and then take the CC college entrance exams and allow the CC to continue remediating him until he is ready for a vo-tech program of choice, military, college, whatever he ends up wanting to do.

 

Plus, taking 5 years for high school is a perfectly legitimate path. Transcripts are set up for the last four years which means that some of his remedial courses won't be counted, but he'd have time for more electives and such. He may need the extra time. That said, you are stepping into a difficult situation taking on someone else's child so you have to take into account what is best for you and your family too, and a 5th year may not be ideal.

 

I don't know the situation, but if self-esteem is an issue, then I highly recommend that he be allowed something outside core academics, scouts, 4-H, tech-center, adult community ed like electronics, a sport, chess, music lessons, whatever floats his boat that is amenable to your family schedule so he can take pride in some accomplishments fairly quickly.

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1.  If there are LD's he needs an evaluation if at all possible.  In fact, with being that far behind I would see if there was any way to get evals even if you don't think there are LDs.  That will give you better answers for how to help and it will also give him accomodations on standardized tests.  

 

2.  Can he graduate?  Yes, but it depends on why he is so far behind.  And he may need an extra year.  

 

3.  He is probably not terribly motivated because he IS so far behind.  Why try when success seems so remote?  And if he has undiagnosed LD's he probably doesn't have very good self esteem for even wanting to try.

 

4.  Tutors are nice, but if there is an  LD they may not have the training to recognize what he really needs to succeed.

 

5.  Great suggestions up thread for actual ways to work the curriculum but I would push for evaluations ASAP if you possibly can.

 

6.  Self-esteem and support are going to be two huge factors.  He needs something he can do outside of academics that gets him fired up about life.  That gives him hope and purpose.  I have two kids who are bright and have LDs.  The academic struggles were destroying DD emotionally.  Once we found and pushed outside interests, she found out she was actually quite good at many things.  That improved self-esteem tremendously, gave her and us other avenues for future careers that she hadn't even thought of, which improved her willingness to work harder at academics.  And evals gave us answers for how to specifically help with academics.  It was a HUGE turn around here.

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You might also post on the Learning Challenges board.

 

 

And I agree, you might look at the AGS textbooks.  High School level texts but written at a lower reading level and more basic layout.  Linking the Wieser website (I think its on the PreAlgebra book but there are lots of subjects) so you can just look at samples but I wouldn't buy from there.  Amazon usually has the texts and workbooks for Waaaaay cheaper.  And Rainbow Resource carries some.

 

http://www.wiesereducational.com/products/pre-algebra-textbook-mm7441.htm

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:grouphug:

 

I would test his reading grade level and check his ability to read nonsense words and his score on the MWIA.

 

http://www.thephonicspage.org/On%20Reading/readinggradeleve.html

 

I would focus this first year on getting his math and Language Arts up to speed while using whatever is easiest or he enjoys the most for the other subjects, making sure there is at least 1 class he is excited about if at all possible.

 

Even if he is reading well, he could watch through my online spelling lessons and learn a lot from those. If he is below the 12th grade level or struggles with nonsense words, I would have him watch through my phonics lessons.

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You might read through How to Homeschool Your Struggling Learner by Kathy Kuhl, too.  I think a relative posts on these boards periodically and might be able to answer questions.  I just don't remember her name.

 

Also, The Mislabeled Child by Brock and Fernette Eide might give you ideas on what is causing the disconnect....

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I just wanted to thank everyone for their help. There is a lot to think about and a lot to consider.

 

Honestly, I am overwhelmed. I want to help my nephew, and I will help him. However, I refuse to neglect my children even for a season for that to happen. I have to figure out how to work with all of them ...well. I don't want to pull my kids out of their activities (my dd is a competitive gymnast and I won't ask her to give that up bc her aunt and uncle are drug addicts that screwed up)

 

Ok I'm being harsh. I know. I just need to work this out. I am all about sacrifice. My children are learning sacrifice, they are sharing their parents, living with a moody teenager that doesn't really like them, they are sacrificing financial extras like entertainment and eating out bc we have an extra teenage boy in the family....learning that sacrifice is part of life and that this is what family does-- help one another. They are sacrificing. To ask them to give up more would not be fair.

 

To take away from their education for me to focus solely or even mostly on him is not fair either.

 

Nor do I think it necessary at this point. The tutor is supposed to pick up my slack so I don't have to make my other 3 sacrifice any more....

 

If I didn't have access to a tutor I would definitely make myself more available...

 

Not only overwhelmed the situation makes me angry. Angry at my brother and sister in law for doing this to him. Angry at the system who ignored the calls to intervene. Angry that myself who feels selfish about what this is costing me and my three children.

 

I want to help him. I do. I can only imagine how overwhelmed he must feel if I feel this way. And that makes me sad.

 

Deep breath.

 

Ok a few answers to some questions.

 

No known LD's other than a childhood diagnosis of ADHD. He was just extremely educationally neglected....for years....and years.

 

He is a decent reader. He likes some gaming fiction...he is very into video and computer games...twitch tv, online gaming, etc. we are trying to help him with the addiction...I don't feel like we are doing well but we are trying.

 

That came out more vent than anything. Sorry. I do appreciate all of your help. Truly. I will reread and look up all of your suggestions tonight. :)

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Huge huge hugs. You are in an extremely difficult position and the fact that you are trying is wonderful. You may be his only shot. Thank goodness you were willing and able. I am so sorry you are stuck like this though. This is a VERY hard position to be in. Don't feel bad for feeling resentful. He probably does, too. Neither one of you asked for this.

 

Honestly, he needs current evaluations. If he was labeled ADHD then there could be many co-morbid issues that would not easily be recognized by a layman. Is there a Scottish Rite nearby? They might be able to help for a much lower cost.

 

And ADHD alone can cause a significant impact on his ability to function academically. Evaluations could provide you and him and the tutor with much more productive ways of handling everything so things aren't so incredibly hard.

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:grouphug:  :grouphug: hugs! :grouphug:  :grouphug:

 

I totally agree with OneStepAtATime, and love how she phrased it:

 

"Huge huge hugs. You are in an extremely difficult position and the fact that you are trying is wonderful. You may be his only shot. Thank goodness you were willing and able. I am so sorry you are stuck like this though. This is a VERY hard position to be in. Don't feel bad for feeling resentful. He probably does, too. Neither one of you asked for this."

 

 

Thank you for sharing all that you did. You are very wise to see the importance of balance, and it sounds like you have many good things in place. Sometimes it just takes time for those things to take root and bring forth fruit, so praying for endurance and patience for all of you. SO sad about this young man's parents. :(

 

Please do vent here! It is a safe place to do so. And it helps us better understand your situation to be able to come up with ideas that are more likely to really be of help. :)

 

With all good thoughts and wises for you, your family, and your nephew, warmest regards, Lori D.

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:grouphug:  :grouphug: hugs! :grouphug:  :grouphug:

 

I totally agree with OneStepAtATime, and love how she phrased it:

 

"Huge huge hugs. You are in an extremely difficult position and the fact that you are trying is wonderful. You may be his only shot. Thank goodness you were willing and able. I am so sorry you are stuck like this though. This is a VERY hard position to be in. Don't feel bad for feeling resentful. He probably does, too. Neither one of you asked for this."

 

 

Thank you for sharing all that you did. You are very wise to see the importance of balance, and it sounds like you have many good things in place. Sometimes it just takes time for those things to take root and bring forth fruit, so praying for endurance and patience for all of you. SO sad about this young man's parents. :(

 

Please do vent here! It is a safe place to do so. And it helps us better understand your situation to be able to come up with ideas that are more likely to really be of help. :)

 

With all good thoughts and wises for you, your family, and your nephew, warmest regards, Lori D.

Yes, to all of that.

 

:grouphug:  :grouphug:  :grouphug:  :grouphug:

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He will need additional one on one work, but I like ADAM K7 math test for identifying problem areas and linking to related Kahn videos in areas that need remediation. For $20, you get both the assessment and a bit of remediation.

 

https://www.letsgolearn.com/lglsite/ADAM_math/parents/

 

He could learn a bit while helping out and feeling like he is smart in an area if he helped you teach Webster's Speller to your kids. You all start out with the basics and they he could help out whoever he worked well with or the highest level so he was learning a bit, too, if you used the program on my well taught student page and added in the spelling and syllable division rules to Webster.

 

http://www.thephonicspage.org/On%20Reading/WellTaughtPhonicsStudent.html

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Look aside from the school for a second. ;)

 

Here's my question:

 

Is he of normal, average intelligence?

 

(This has NOTHING to do with willingness to learn or material learned.)

 

If he's of NORMAL intelligence and was held back in K  AND is five years behind in public school 

 

THIS KID HAS A LEARNING DISABILITY.

 

And anything you do without remediating that is utterly, totally USELESS.

 

Most likely?  85% of LD's is dyslexia.

40% of dyslexics have dyscalculia.

 

No remediation he'll just experience failure when he finally has hope.

That should kill his self esteem and image forever.

 

Get a GOOD assessment.

Go from there.

 

Talking about curriculum and graduation is pointless without this information 'cuz really, if you manage to "graduate" him and he still thinks he's a stupid failure and can't cope with learning, really what are his chances out in the world?  Not great.

 

BTW, the tone of this post is positive and wants to tell you - this kid could FLY if that's "all" this is.  You will give him an ENORMOUS chance.  If he's dyslexic, with remediation, the difference in academic and his LIFE could be enormous.

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No known LD's other than a childhood diagnosis of ADHD. He was just extremely educationally neglected....for years....and years.

 

 

 

 

ADHD goes hand in hand with dyslexia and dyslexia would NOT have (9 times out of 10) been picked up by the school system.

Just as an aside.

 

If this is what it is, you can have REAL hope.  I'm hoping for you.

And I'll tell you, even successful dyslexics will tell you they really thought they were slow or stupid... It was a HUGE relief to find out they weren't dumb.

 

Failing kindergarten is a real indicator.  This has been a life long struggle and people with struggles tend to "self-medicate" - it's helpful to know here that dyslexia is genetic and that the prison population is more than double (50%+) dyslexics vs. real world stats (1 in 5.)

 

(Not that I'm insanely, over the top about dyslexia awareness of anything.....)

 

:seeya:

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No known LD's other than a childhood diagnosis of ADHD. He was just extremely educationally neglected....for years....and years.

 

He is a decent reader. He likes some gaming fiction...he is very into video and computer games...twitch tv, online gaming, etc. we are trying to help him with the addiction...I don't feel like we are doing well but we are trying.

 

That came out more vent than anything. Sorry. I do appreciate all of your help. Truly. I will reread and look up all of your suggestions tonight. :)

 

People with ADHD may be more vulnerable to addiction, including gaming addiction, because both conditions generally involve dopamine processing deficits. A recent study in Korea showed that a large percentage of obsessive gamers had the same genetic marker for a particular dopamine processing deficit that has been linked to other addictions, including drugs, alcohol, nicotine, and gambling. There are a few studies suggesting that medicating for ADHD in drug addicts reduces the cravings as well as improving attention and reducing impulsivity.

 

I would definitely look into getting him an evaluation, and possibly getting him on meds for the ADHD. Dopamine reuptake inhibitors (like Ritalin) could help with both his academic work and the gaming addiction, and maybe help prevent him following in his parents' footsteps.

 

Your nephew is very lucky to have you!

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If he's of NORMAL intelligence and was held back in K  AND is five years behind in public school 

 

THIS KID HAS A LEARNING DISABILITY.

 

I don't think this is a fair assessment. See this thread. This child hasn't been in school or schooled at all for years. That is why he is behind. ADHD may be playing a part, but there is no reason to suspect dyslexia. Reading seems to be one of his stronger skills. He has lacked opportunity, not ability. Many, many little boys, particularly those from difficult homes get held back in K as not ready. It really doesn't mean much at all.

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I don't think this is a fair assessment. See this thread. This child hasn't been in school or schooled at all for years. That is why he is behind. ADHD may be playing a part, but there is no reason to suspect dyslexia. Reading seems to be one of his stronger skills. He has lacked opportunity, not ability. Many, many little boys, particularly those from difficult homes get held back in K as not ready. It really doesn't mean much at all.

Actually, if you re-read that thread, unless I am mis-reading the post, he was in public school through 5th grade and still has spelling and phonics issues.  And struggles in math.  And OP is saying he is at least 5 years behind grade level in functionality.  That is definitely an indicator that dyslexia may be part of the issue.  Many dyslexics can read.  Doesn't mean they have good reading processes in place.  It just means that they are bright enough and have enough strengths in other areas to make work arounds that help them read.  And many dyslexic boys with ADHD are not properly diagnosed by schools because they assume the issue is attitude, not an underlying LD.  This is especially prevalent in cases where there are challenges at home.  Everything is blamed on the home issues and attitude, and more detailed evaluations are never pursued.

 

Is this boy dyslexic?  Who knows?  That is why evaluations are so critical at this point.  So the OP has solid answers for all the issues that may be going on instead of continuing to limp along trying to help but not having specifics in place for what help he really needs.

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I recommend having him study all about fractions before taking TT Pre-Algebra.  Granted, some of it will be repeated, but it will be time well spent.   Kahn Academy is a good resource or Key to Fractions by Key Cirriculum. 

 

Maybe one of his high school courses could an elective based in interest. 

 

 

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Actually, if you re-read that thread, unless I am mis-reading the post, he was in public school through 5th grade and still has spelling and phonics issues. And struggles in math. And OP is saying he is at least 5 years behind grade level in functionality. That is definitely an indicator that dyslexia may be part of the issue. Many dyslexics can read. Doesn't mean they have good reading processes in place. It just means that they are bright enough and have enough strengths in other areas to make work arounds that help them read. And many dyslexic boys with ADHD are not properly diagnosed by schools because they assume the issue is attitude, not an underlying LD. This is especially prevalent in cases where there are challenges at home. Everything is blamed on the home issues and attitude, and more detailed evaluations are never pursued.

 

Is this boy dyslexic? Who knows? That is why evaluations are so critical at this point. So the OP has solid answers for all the issues that may be going on instead of continuing to limp along trying to help but not having specifics in place for what help he really needs.

Actually, when he first came to me that's what I was thinking-- he hadn't been to school since 5th grade...but then I realized he homeschooled K with my other sister (she served as a paid tutor/homeschool teacher that year), (oh and he was held back by his parents choice then bc of behavior issues), he was with a private tutor for first grade, I don't think he went to school for 2nd until the second half of 5th where he went into public school for half the year. So pretty much this poor kid has had almost no opportunity for education. :,(

 

I am not counting out LD's, and am happy to get him evaluated. Of course there is zero health insurance so I would prefer not to jump there if not necessary. He seems to be making great strides in the past two months so my instinct is that this is simply a neglect situation. If something changes I will for sure head into the eval direction.

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I am not counting out LD's, and am happy to get him evaluated. Of course there is zero health insurance so I would prefer not to jump there if not necessary. He seems to be making great strides in the past two months so my instinct is that this is simply a neglect situation. If something changes I will for sure head into the eval direction.

 

You could talk to the ps about doing an eval. Almost all will (a few states don't require them to and at least one doesn't allow it). You have to make the request in writing and at this point, they probably won't do it until next year unless your district continues later into summer than ours.

 

The best part of using the ps is that it would be free. Some do a great job and will give you all the info you need. Some are nearly useless and a lot of trouble. A phone call and a few questions would probably tell you which you are dealing with and if you want to pursue it. If so, visit the Learning Challenges Board if you need help with how to make the formal request.

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With time being so short and private evals not feasible, I'd definitely see about getting him PS evals.  Check the district website (e.g., look for the special ed dept or "learning services"), call to ask specifics, pop a letter in the mail (if you are really lucky, maybe they'll give you an appointment over the phone, but send a letter to confirm your request and the appt).  If there are no issues, nothing lost.  If there are issues and you wait to look for them, you will be kicking yourself in a year.  The long-ago mention of adhd adds suspicion of LDs in this scenario.  And if the childhood diagnosis of adhd is actually correct, even with nothing more, exploring that avenue could make all the difference.  Note that the PS process takes time (as do private evals).

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