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Dyslexia and siblings


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Have you noticed that younger siblings of your dyslexic kids use adaptive equipment or strategies that were designed for your learning challenged kid?

 

My son, who is not dyslexic, has taken to listening at high speed versus reading textbooks, and dictating directly into the computer rather than typing. He says that it allows him to keep his fingers free for "more important stuff." While I don't mind, I wonder it is best to allow him to continue. Should I care?

 

He reads for pleasure so it isn't a matter of skill, and his writing is lovely so... I don't really know how I feel about this. Anyone care to think it through with me?

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Well, TBH, I think that is how the future is heading.  I think a lot of NT people will start using those adaptive technologies/strategies.  Many already have.

 

Probably a good idea to still keep skill sets strong without them since you never know when something like that will fail, though, or be unavailable or not allowed or not convenient, etc..  

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If it leaves a skill hole (like say his wpm typing speed is low), you could just adding a typing contest to his summer plans or something sneaky like that.  But yes, my dd has been trying to up the speed on audio too.  I think it's fine for anyone.  :)

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I can't imagine that listening to audiobooks at a high rate of speed or using voice to text software would be harmful.  I see those methods as exploiting learning styles and utilizing efficient study skills.

 

I expect that if my DD chooses to use those technologies, I will allow it alongside mindmapping, which is just a visual way to outline.  The real accommodations for a dyslexic are extra time on tests and/or having a reader during standardized tests.  Unless a diagnosed disability is present, DD won't receive any of that.  I don't know the future, but I expect DD will be typing by late 5th grade.  I see no reason to delay teaching that skill.

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One concern with audio books, is with unknown words?

Which is perhaps more relevant to non-fiction books.

When reading, it is quite simple to stop and look up what a word means.

But with just hearing an unknown word?

It would be a difficult process, of trying to imagine how it would be spelled, to look it up?

 

This could also be a problem with learning new technical terms?

 

So perhaps you could get him to explore different ways of reading and writing, to suit the material?

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