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Music theory specifically for violinists?


Aloha2U
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Please bear with me as I'm not exactly sure of what I'm seeking.

 

My little man plays the violin and takes lessons from a Suzuki instructor—the best imo ;) . I'd like to find a go-to book or something that presents music theory, particularly with regards to the violin and how the different eras—Baroque, Classical, etc.—influenced different bow strokes, etc. Does anything like this exist?

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My 10 year old is working through the Grace VanDenDool Keyboard Theory books. They are written for piano more than for violin. It's difficult to find a theory book largely for violin because at the rudiments level they need to get comfy with the bass clef, and the musical structures, and it's easier to see that on piano music because all the parts are there, so the teachers here typically suggest this series. That being said, my son LOVED these books, and even ended up taking piano lessons too because he enjoyed them so much! (He's a bit of a nut for music theory, and music in general). 

 

If you're looking for something more on the lines of music history, and historical performance, I really don't have any great ideas there. Sorry. You might try http://www.violinist.com. They have more info on the violin than you can imagine, and a very active forum. 

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I had a look when Ms. 6 started violin, but didn't find anything specific. She plays piano as well now so she has a few general theory/musicianship workbooks, plus a musical dictionary and some reference books about composers etc. But I'd love to get her a general music history book aimed at kids.

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I don't know of anything specifically for violin, but maybe The Green Violin is something along the lines of what you're looking for? The Violin: A Social History of the World's Most Versatile Instrument looks like it covers the history pretty well, though it may be a bit dense for your DS. 

 

We use Theory Time which teaches theory with a little bit of keyboard use, both treble and bass clefs. It's a solid series, IMO. 

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TBH, I'd see about starting with some gentle piano instruction if you can. Learning piano will widely open a violinist's grasp of theory and is another lifelong skill. Knowing piano was hugely beneficial for me by the time I got to the point where knowing theory was essential. I found it nearly effortless because I was capable of thinking of it in two different mediums. (Much like English grammar because much easier when you learn another language.)

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I use Theory Time with all my students, violin and piano. What you're asking about is more of a music history thing.

 

You might be interested in this book:

 

http://www.sharmusic.com/Accessories/Books-DVDs/Stories-of-Composers-for-Young-Musicians-by-C-Kendall.axd#sthash.XWEfSs3F.dpbs

 

Short biographies of the composers of pieces in Suzuki repertoire. It's easy to find info on Bach, but Gossec and Bayly are a little more obscure. This book covers them all.

 

If you can find a resource focusing more on Paganini, he influenced a lot of change in violin playing.

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