Jump to content

Menu

Literary Lessons from LoTR-semester or year for AL?


Recommended Posts

I'm looking at LL from LoTR for DD10 for next year. We're doing the Odyssey and Iliad with our mythology group, she loves the books, and she is going to need something that isn't too heavy and is more fun since her science stuff is getting more intense. Looking at the table of contents, I think she'll enjoy it. But I really can't imagine it taking her a year, and I notice G3 does it in a semester. Has anyone done this with an AL? How did it work?

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It would take me at least a yr (i actually did it over 2 yrs with my dyslexic) BUT that is bc what we love about it is the units in between the books. We took the time to read a lot of the other works she describes.....that means everything from essays and other major works by Tolkien, Norse mythology, the Iliad, Odyssey, Beowulf, legends of King Arthur as well as Sir Gawain, Shakespeare, etc. (fwiw, skipping the units means that it is just a lot of definitions and comprehension questions.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's what appeals to me as well. We've done a lot of mythology over the last few years, so this would be a way of synthesizing it all together. But at the same time, since she's already read not only the main books but a lot of the additional stuff, I'm not sure how much new there will be for her. This is a kid who has multiple versions of Beowulf on her bookshelf, for example, and who wanted to learn Greek because of the Iliad.

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We took a year to really enjoy Literary Lessons.  It didn't matter that my ds had already read LotR and most of the works in the units because of all the extras in the curriculum, especially in the early chapters when so many literary analysis terms are explored.  We pretty much ignored the comprehension and vocabulary work sheets for each chapter of LotR, but instead I'd read the commentary in the teacher's guide and we'd talk about it. A friend's dd thought the work sheets were "fun" and did every single one of them!  After each book we'd watch the movie and we watched the extras on the DVDs, especially the parts where the screenwriters talked about the choices they made in adapting the books.  We'd talk about the differences between book and movie, about those choices and whether it worked or not.  

 

I can't remember now what materials I added to the units and what was already suggested within the units, but we watched several lectures and I found odds and ends on the internet.  For instance, has your dd watched or listened yet to the Great Courses lectures by Dr. Vandiver  on the Iliad and the Odyssey?  That would be a way for her to go deeper into those works.  You can be as meaty as you want, go as in depth as you like.  I myself found the units added so much to my own appreciation of the books.  For instance the Two Towers made so much more literary sense after studying Beowolf and the small section in Return of the King with the mountain men made more sense after studying Sir Gawain. 

 

It's a brilliant way to geek out in depth, and the curriculum is adaptable to many different ability levels so even the most asynchronous can get much out of it.  Do as much or as little as you like, and you can even return to it in a few years.  The thing about great literary works is that there is always more to get out of it, and I think gifted kids love to discover new facets to what they've read, or to see how their responses to works changes with their maturity.  At least it is true with one of my sons.

 

Btw, have you heard of Christopher Paolinini, the author of the Eragon trilogy?  He was homeschooled, published that first book at the age of 14 or 15.  I heard him speak at an author panel once and it was just delightful to hear him talk about how his love of LotR sent him to read the King Arthur stories and to explore Greek and Nordic mythology.  He was a poster child for homeschooling: charming, intelligent and articulate and adorably geeky!

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We did is a year or so ago with a large part of our mythology work as well. Totally fun! The reading pace to get through all the books in a year was rather blistering then. Now it would not be as big a deal, but it is still often 25-40 pages a day. I think if you listened in the car or between sessions at a conference it might not be so bad. Trying to compact it into a semester would be quite a squish if you wanted her to read them all as well as do the Units which look into other works.

 

It is well worth doing, though, especially if you were to place it with Medieval history. If we were not doing a ridiculously light English year next year then I would more than likely go through it again with Ds and add in lots of other reading now that he can read much faster.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...