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The set I bought from MFW:  http://www.mfwbooks.com/item/50084/Physics-Complete/

 

The price of the Microchem kit I bought new and I also bought the Apologia Chem set new from MFW:  http://www.qualitysciencelabs.com/chemistry-labs/microchem-kit-standard-edition/

 

Maybe there is a glut of these items out there, maybe a lot of people just aren't hitting this high in school---but for whatever reasons it doesn't matter because it drives me batty.  I price my curriculum well within reselling limits, as I homeschooled and bought and sold stuff for 14 years.  There has been a change though---could be just more homeschoolers, more slick advertising from companies manipulating people to buy new---2ND EDITION, 3RD EDITION or a new shiny cover---when everything else is the same.  

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No more than 50% for materials that have seen daily use over at least one school year has been the norm for a long time.   It's all I'll pay, after receiving so many dog eared, marked up, or slightl

People aren't telling you that they don't want to give their kids "the best." They're telling you that they don't see your cast offs as the best. They're not telling you they have no dignity. They're

So?  You should have bought used then.  The way that buying and selling works is that brand new things cost more than used.  (Ever buy a car?  They start to depreciate the moment you drive it off of t

The set I bought from MFW:  http://www.mfwbooks.com/item/50084/Physics-Complete/

 

The price of the Microchem kit I bought new and I also bought the Apologia Chem set new from MFW:  http://www.qualitysciencelabs.com/chemistry-labs/microchem-kit-standard-edition/

 

Maybe there is a glut of these items out there, maybe a lot of people just aren't hitting this high in school---but for whatever reasons it doesn't matter because it drives me batty.  I price my curriculum well within reselling limits, as I homeschooled and bought and sold stuff for 14 years.  There has been a change though---could be just more homeschoolers, more slick advertising from companies manipulating people to buy new---2ND EDITION, 3RD EDITION or a new shiny cover---when everything else is the same.  

It's been my experience with homeschool publishers that rarely is anything updated and a new edition made unless there IS a difference on a larger scale - homeschool publishing companies haven't the extra to just willy-nilly pump out new editions for the heck of it. 

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My point......exactly!  Sold by a used book seller on Amazon---not a homeschool family trying to recoup a few hard earned dollars to buy the next years books.  And guess what---I bet YOU will go and resell these same books on Amazon for the same $5 or even ask up to $10---am I right??  I know I am. 

No, I'm too lazy to do that. I give our textbooks away when we're done to someone irl who will be at an event I'm going to or will pick them up. Sometimes I tear up cheap books to make work packets for vacations or rehearsals or just to make the material less intimidating. Those just go in paper recycling.

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I hate buying and selling too.

 

I just boxed up 4 years of SL (older but still useable) and donated it to our local missions group where I know MANY parents homeschool and could really appreciate it and use it.  

 

I am taking the donation as a write off in taxes and know that I helped someone.

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When selling I just price it at whatever the market will bare, I check Amazon and a few other places. I expect that I will have to sell cheaper than Amazon as there is some security to buying from Amazon that there isn't when buying from an individual seller. Now, some things I can get more than 50%, like some MCT, LoF and other higher demand not as common materials but that isn't the norm.

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I went to a garage sale on Saturday that had a bunch of curricula for sale. None of it had any prices. When I showed my stack of potential purchases to the woman, she said that she wasn't selling them at garage sale prices and related that someone had tried to buy some of the books for $1. DH thought she said it in a rather snotty tone. I ended up not buying anything because ai thought the prices were too high. If she wanted a "fair" price, she shouldn't be trying to sell them at a garage sale. We have a great homeschool store with a consignment section. She should just go there instead of annoying her customers. At the very least, she should've labeled things with prices.

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I went to a garage sale on Saturday that had a bunch of curricula for sale. None of it had any prices. When I showed my stack of potential purchases to the woman, she said that she wasn't selling them at garage sale prices and related that someone had tried to buy some of the books for $1. DH thought she said it in a rather snotty tone. I ended up not buying anything because ai thought the prices were too high. If she wanted a "fair" price, she shouldn't be trying to sell them at a garage sale. We have a great homeschool store with a consignment section. She should just go there instead of annoying her customers. At the very least, she should've labeled things with prices.

I love our homeschool/ consignment shop!  

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We have a local homeschool store that resells used curriculum. 50% off list is their price. They usually have many copies of the popular options. Homeschoolers who sell their used curriculum at used curricula sales usually price it a little lower than 50% off. Why should I pay more than 50% if this is the norm in my area?

 

BTW, I try to shoot for 30-40% unless the item is brand new, just published, and I purchased it and it isn't going to work for me and I can't return it. This is mostly because of my area and what prices the market will bear. I know I can get 25% of list at my homeschool store. Sometimes that is just easier.

 

 

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If I'm paying 50% or more, I might as well just get new.  I consider the original user to have received 100% of the benefit of ownership plus that "new curriculum" smell so anything they get from me is a bonus.  I feel the same when I sell things. 

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I view curriculum a lot like buying a brand new car. As soon as you drive it off the lot that first day, it depreciates very, very quickly. Why? Idk. But it's a fact. I've had a few currics "hold their value" better than others, but it's not my expectation. If I make a buying mistake I've made a mistake. It's the cost of doing school and it's cheaper (and better) than private school even if I never resell. That's one thing I love about the WTM boards. I make fewer mistakes researching well. :)

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I view curriculum a lot like buying a brand new car. As soon as you drive it off the lot that first day, it depreciates very, very quickly. 

Unless you're trying to BUY that used car.

 

I was looked at Foresters a few weeks ago.  They had a 2012 that was only $1000 less than the new Foresters!

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Just wait until you're sucked into the college textbook scam, er, business.  You're forced to buy very, very expensive textbooks (really, homeschooling curriculum is NOTHING compared to college texts), and when it's time to sell back, you get pennies for the dollar, IF they will even buy them back in the first place.

 

Trust me, save your griping for then.  It's way more frustrating.

My kids are in college and they buy all used and when they resell, the don't get ripped near as badly as with homeschool used curriculum.  

 

I know some of you understand and feel my pain, but truly, accepting the whole idea behind spending say $120 on a set of books, using them once and then not being able to get $60 for perfect condition is demoralizing and just chock full of limiting beliefs IMO.  I felt repressed by this whole concept all 14 years homeschooling and just really glad to not be bound by this anymore.  I apologize if I have been insulting....but I'm glad to have moved on to a different tribe and a different mindset in life.

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Just wait until you're sucked into the college textbook scam, er, business. You're forced to buy very, very expensive textbooks (really, homeschooling curriculum is NOTHING compared to college texts), and when it's time to sell back, you get pennies for the dollar, IF they will even buy them back in the first place.

 

Trust me, save your griping for then. It's way more frustrating.

You speak the truth. I had to buy a new textbook for ds because he needed the one time use online code for the class. Such a scam.

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I didn't read all the responses, but I am not one to get offended if a mom wants to try to get a cheaper price.

 

I have donated to book samaritan many times. Over the years here, I have also practically given curriculum away to families just to clean off my shelf. I have also been in very tight spots ( dh lost job, illness, moving expenses, etc..) where I was so eternally thankful when someone had compassion on me.

 

I guess I don't think to deep into when someone tries to make a bargain. I just figure they are trying to make their dollar stretch as far as it can go. We all are, in a way, doing that to some extent. Also, what comes around, goes around. That is my experience.

 

Just my 2 cents worth, not that it is worth much lol

 

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Just wait until you're sucked into the college textbook scam, er, business.  You're forced to buy very, very expensive textbooks (really, homeschooling curriculum is NOTHING compared to college texts), and when it's time to sell back, you get pennies for the dollar, IF they will even buy them back in the first place.

 

Trust me, save your griping for then.  It's way more frustrating.

 

 

I think the worst case is what one of my friends and colleagues did, years ago. He was teaching Math in a Community College (in TX), after getting fed up with the way Engineers are treated in industry.  

 

He and another guy wrote a Math textbook. I believe it was about Calculus. Then, he had his students buy *his* textbook for his course...

 

Probably in a situation like that, there is negligible chance of being able to buy it used at a low price and probably the only resale would be to students in that CC.

 

However, someone in Korea translated (without permission) the book into Korean and didn't pay them any royalties.

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I am curious how old some of this curriculum you're trying to sell is, since it looks like you've been homeschooling a long time. Are these materials your kids used in the last 2 years or are they from throughout their homeschooling career?

 

Especially when a publisher has put out a new edition, I can imagine this really dropping resale price. I've had that happen recently with a used, but full K boxed curriculum, that I probably should have tried to resell right away but it sat in the basement one year too many. ;)

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Selling can be a pain.  I've had instances where people will ask me to total up and weigh various random items and send them a total.  Then they decide that they don't want it after all, when I've spent time picking through everything, finding a box, etc.

 

That said, I don't ask more than 50% of new.  I look around online to see what the going rate for things is.

 

If I'm buying something, I don't want to get an older, marked-up copy of a TM for a package if all of this is only going to save me $10 or so.

 

I don't buy anything with the view of being able to make money back on it.   :confused1:

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He and another guy wrote a Math textbook. I believe it was about Calculus. Then, he had his students buy *his* textbook for his course...

 

Probably in a situation like that, there is negligible chance of being able to buy it used at a low price and probably the only resale would be to students in that CC.

 

 

In university I had a chemistry teacher that did that - we had to buy his textbook.  It was just out.... well, but not complete.  He would give us additions to the textbook in class.  (I don't remember what the actual textbook looked like - if it was bound or what.)  Like, I remember him giving us in class the textbook section on 'The first law of thermodynamics'.  So it was VERY incomplete.

 

And.... if you didn't understand his explanation in class for something - well, turning to the textbook was pretty much useless.   I realized later that I should have bought the book used by the same class taught by different professors.

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The value of anything is essentially what someone is willing to pay. Sucks for someone trying to recoup their initial purchase but it is what it is. A careful used purchaser will look in past months for a historical "moving" price and have a good idea of what the going rate is.

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My kids are in college and they buy all used and when they resell, the don't get ripped near as badly as with homeschool used curriculum.

 

I apologize if I have been insulting....but I'm glad to have moved on to a different tribe and a different mindset in life.

The college costs/resale is significantly worse. And, generally, an apology isn't followed by another insult. Good luck in greener pastures or whatever.

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I don't like selling our used stuff, either. Luckily, I'm able to reuse stuff for all three kids most of the time. By then, I have definitely got my money's worth out of it.

 

What frustrates me about buying used is when I find a workbook or something for a great price, and I almost buy it. Then I see in the fine print that some of the lessons have been completed already. :) I can't imagine wanting to buy something like that.

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Hmm. I don't usually haggle over asking price - I either purchase or don't - but I understood that the general rule of thumb for curriculum resale was 30% of original price. Exceptions might be pristine/completely unused consumables, new condition nonconsumables, or valuable out of print items (like that old DK red history encyclopedia).

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No more than 50% for materials that have seen daily use over at least one school year has been the norm for a long time.

 

It's all I'll pay, after receiving so many dog eared, marked up, or slightly sticky books that were advertised as 'like new condition' online. I might pay more for something IRL if I can see it really is clean and crisp.

I used to buy used from individual sellers and received far too many "like new" items in the above condition. I've had better luck on buying used from Amazon and half.com, but still expect textbooks to show up battered and marked. I always pay less than 50% the new price otherwise, to me, it's not worth the gamble on the item's true condition.

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50% is the guideline I use too. I won't pay more than 50% for any used books or curriculum. Also when I price my items for sale, they are always at around the 50% mark or lower. I always assume that's how the second hand market is, nothing personal.

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First off, name calling will not help your cause in the least. 

Second, some people are squeezing every penny together to try to buy used high priced curriculum, a little compassion and empathy go a long way. 

Third, haggling is part of some people's culture. It's natural to them. There's certain people in my FB community garage sale group that always ask for less no matter what the item. Negotiating is assumed on their end and I've just come to expect it. 

Fourth, research the going rate of reused items before buying so you know what to expect. 

Fifth, some items just don't resell well. I donate those. 

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My point......exactly! Sold by a used book seller on Amazon---not a homeschool family trying to recoup a few hard earned dollars to buy the next years books. And guess what---I bet YOU will go and resell these same books on Amazon for the same $5 or even ask up to $10---am I right?? I know I am.

I don't understand the derogatory comment about "use book sellers on Amazon." Many homeschool families sell their used curriculum on Amazon -- and pay Amazon's fees off the top of that already-reasonable selling price.

 

I don't mean this in a nasty way, but I think you have an unrealistic idea about the value of used curriculum. If you want to get a higher percentage of your money back when you resell, you should consider buying used instead of new (and spend a lot of time searching for those bargains.)

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OP, you must be really upset about this to put it on the General Education board and the Chat board.  :(

 

I'm really sorry you are hurting with this,...but in the whole realm of life, there are so many other things in life to be upset about. 

 

Hope you are able to get past this soon. 

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I don't understand getting so worked up about it. It's just money. Selling something to someone is just business and both the buyer and the seller need to look at it that way. Emotions and feelings have nothing to do with it. Selling is based on supply and demand and you need to do your research a little better if nothing is selling. I may FEEL my house is worth a million dollars because my kids grew up in it, the layout is perfect, the schools are great but the bottom line is market value sets the price not my feelings. Market value is what someone is willing to spend on something and markets fluctuate. It would be unwise for a buyer to spend more on something than market value because you feel they should give you more money.

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OP, you must be really upset about this to put it on the General Education board and the Chat board. :(

 

I'm really sorry you are hurting with this,...but in the whole realm of life, there are so many other things in life to be upset about.

 

Hope you are able to get past this soon.

I hadn't noticed that she posted in two different places. This must be really bothering her.

 

4wildberrys, I'm sorry you are so upset about this. :grouphug:

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I used to buy used from individual sellers and received far too many "like new" items in the above condition. I've had better luck on buying used from Amazon and half.com, but still expect textbooks to show up battered and marked. I always pay less than 50% the new price otherwise, to me, it's not worth the gamble on the item's true condition.

:iagree:

 

There is also the risk that the person selling you the curriculum will never actually send it, or they will pack it so terribly that it arrives incomplete or damaged -- assuming it was ever actually in the "like new" condition as it was advertised.

 

Buyers take a risk every time they buy from an individual seller they have never met, so I think that entitles them to a larger discount than the OP seems to believe she should give them.

 

I am sure the OP is an honest seller, but the people buying from her don't know that, nor have they had a chance to inspect her materials before they buy from her, so I understand why they are looking for a substantial discount.

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I do understand your frustration, but selling is really rarely worth your time or energy.  Do you have anyone to donate your things to?  That would save you a lot of headaches, and you would just be done with it.  I don't have anyone to gift our curriculum to, so I just throw most of it away, and donate a few things to the library.  It makes me slightly sick to throw away curriculum that is barely used (or is sometimes completely unused), but it is worth it just to get it out of the house.  

 

ETA: I very, very rarely buy used curriculum because I have found that most people overstate the condition.  So, I do understand why people are reluctant to pay good money if they can't check it out in person.  

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Many buyers would consider purchasing sight unseen a big risk. In your area, is there a homeschool curriculum store or a book sale? Our local homeschooling group has a book sale every year. If buyers could see the condition of your items, they may be more willing to purchase them at your asking price.

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I wouldn't be upset about the price thing it's just how it goes. The comments made by the person haggling were pretty rude though and I can understand being upset by that. One thing I do know with selling is if you want to get a good price the sooner you decide to sell the better.

 

For example buy a pair of jeans that you decide don't actually fit and sell it immediately and you might get a reasonable price. Hang onto them hoping you will wear them then decide to sell in five years and you just won't. Curriculum is similar. If you want to sell it do it as soon as you are done while it's still looking the same as the current version.

 

With stuff like the physics kit I just wouldn't bother to go second hand. If I'm buying something like that it's for the convenience of knowing that everything is there ready to use when I need it. If I buy second hand there's a high chance I'll have to look around and replace bits and it's just not worth the hassle.

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4wildberrys - I've encountered my fair share of homeschooling cheapskates. I feel your pain and I know exactly what you're talking about. Because sometimes it's not really about the price of books, but the attitude of some of these people. BTW, I am a homeschooler and I like my deals just as much as the next person.

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I think you may have just not found the right buyer. I sold a pricey science kit/curriculum for at least 1/2 price. Maybe a little more, I can't recall exactly. I sent photos of the few early work pages that had been written in and the close up pics and a double-checked list of every item in the list. The buyer didn't squabble about price at all, it was just really important to her that every experiment piece in the kit was there as she was overseas. I had blown a good bit of money on the curric (Nancy Larson), hated it, and was glad to get out of it what I'd asked. Sure, I took a loss and she got an almost spanky-new science curriculum at a great price. At least it's not cluttering up my basement anymore.

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Just wait until you're sucked into the college textbook scam, er, business. You're forced to buy very, very expensive textbooks (really, homeschooling curriculum is NOTHING compared to college texts), and when it's time to sell back, you get pennies for the dollar, IF they will even buy them back in the first place.

 

Trust me, save your griping for then. It's way more frustrating.

LOL, this is just what I was going to say! I have had a few profs who actively assist the students in getting around ghastly textbook prices (such as my French teacher, who did not require us to go to the "new" edition of the French text), but I have had others who help not at all. Just wait until you get to pay $200 for nothing but a digital access code! Can't resell it; can't even line the bird cage with it! It's just a sunk cost.

 

It did have the unexpected benefit of making me realize how cheaply I was getting my homeschool materials!

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With stuff like the physics kit I just wouldn't bother to go second hand. If I'm buying something like that it's for the convenience of knowing that everything is there ready to use when I need it. If I buy second hand there's a high chance I'll have to look around and replace bits and it's just not worth the hassle.

ITA. The whole perk of a science kit is that I know everything I need is there. If I have to look all over the house for a metal brad and a piece od felt, I will give up. I'm too lazy to do it and want my curriculum ALL put together.

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You speak the truth. I had to buy a new textbook for ds because he needed the one time use online code for the class. Such a scam.

Yes, it's the fabulous online tie-in that you need to purchase new, or the accompanying CD/DVD that's always lost by the first owner. Gah.

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My kids are in college and they buy all used and when they resell, the don't get ripped near as badly as with homeschool used curriculum.  

 

You're comparing apples to oranges. You wouldn't be "ripped off" as badly if you'd bought used as well. If used is good enough for your kids in college, why not in high school, middle school, etc?

 

FWIW, I've got a college physics textbook sitting on my shelf that I bought for $180 USED (used for PHYS 101 and 102 or w/e, so two semesters worth, but...). Then of course they came out with a new edition. At that point, it was no use selling it (which is why I can see it right now, sitting on my shelf, with its used sticker).

 

That is without the access code BS.

 

On the bright side, the books in my upper division classes were cheaper. I've got upper division neuroscience textbooks and upper division library science textbooks, and since there aren't as many people majoring in those it just isn't worth it to the publishers to do access codes and new editions all the time etc. This doesn't work for common majors like psychology or business though, as far as I can tell.

 

ETA: the solutions guide for the physics book was separate, and would have added to the cost had I bought it. I didn't buy it, because I'd already taken this physics stuff in high school in NL (kind of like AP Physics). But for some odd reason there is an AP Physics and not a CLEP Physics (or at least not back then, don't know about now), so I couldn't test out of it.

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With any purchase I make, I make it not expecting to get a dime back. I intend to use something, it has a price, and I decide to pay that price. If I use it, I've lost nothing, as I have done what I intended. If I did not use it, it is my error, and then yes, I have lost money.

 

Should I decide to try to sell it, anything above zero is more than I ever expect to get for any item whether it be kids clothes or a math book. I already made the decision to spend the money so anything returned to me is a bonus. It is no longer taking up space in my home, and now I have money in my pocket.

 

Market values flucutate, especially with high dollar items. I would be wasting my energy to get upset that I'm not getting half my money back, when I am not owed anything by anyone.

 

I can only afford to homeschool buying mostly used and with the hope of selling what doesn't work for us. I still weigh every purchase heavily as I could easily be stuck with something. You could be a blessing to others by selling to them for what they can afford or just donating. I don't really see the difference. I'm sorry you're upset, but you could just list on eBay/Amazon or something with a BIN price and remove all haggling from the equation.

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I understand the need for buying cheap used but there is a way to bargain without making the seller feel guilty that you can't pay the offered price. The shopper needs to understand that the seller might really need the money as well. State your low offer and hold out loosely for a short response.

 

I was very lucky recently to sell a "big impulse math mistake" for 60% of the new price. I am so grateful! My husband was very mad that it was bought when I had something else already that would have worked. The buyer got me out of a huge sticky marriage fight. Lesson learned. The old is working perfectly.

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All the seller has to do is to say that the price is final and will not be negotiated. No guilt necessary.

Exactly. I have done this when someone wanted less literally minutes after I posted it. So, in hopes of giving it more time to find a buyer who would agree to my price, I declined. Wouldn't you know they come back and say they'll take it for what I listed originally? Someone said haggling is a culture and it's totally true. Here, with things like garage sales and such, I always price at more than what I'm willing to take simply to buffer the normal haggling. It's not personal, it's business.

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