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I find it so irritating when I try to sell my used curriculum what absolute nitpicking cheapskates people are!!!  I buy the stuff brand new, use it once and the used buyers want it for more than 50% off what I paid for it or they turn up their noses, or tell me the stuff is a bit dated etc.  Really?!  Why not have some dignity and just cough up a few dollars to educate your kids??  It's what I did, and we were one income and struggling in those days, especially once the kids got to high school.  But I was determined to give them the best.  I think I'll just donate all of my Apologia and other name brand, popular stuff because trying to sell to cheap, nitpickers has me flat out pissed.

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Im sorry you are having a hard time getting any money back out of your investments. I know that can be frustrating. But allow me to play devil's advocate for a minute.

 

I have never purchased any used curriculum or sold any, for the same reasons. Every time I search for used curriculum, the listings I find are offering only a small discount from the new purchase price. Then the used seller charges shipping when the new books would be sent to me for free. In the end it costs the same or maybe $5 less than new. Then you figure in that when you buy from an unknown individual online, there are added risks and chances. Will they even send this? Is it in the condition they say? How will they pack it? And with me, I am a worrier by nature, so I am nervous until I have that item in my hands.

 

Most of the curriculum writers and stores I shop offer discounts of 15-25% at some point through out the year, so for me the whole reason to buy used would be to save at least 40%. Think about the last time you visited a yard sale or thrift store. A pair of men's Levi's are $54 new without a discount but I dont know a single person who would spend $27 on a pair of them at a yard sale or Goodwill, even in "like new" condition. Now, I realize that books hold a bit more value than a pair of old shoes but the mentality is still there that if you are buying something used you expect it to be a good savings over new, not just a small discount. I feel the same way when I am at a store and I see a clearance sign or sticker. If it says "clearance" and they have marked it down from $39.99 to $35, I laugh on over to the next aisle.

 

All that being said, I would never tell someone that their stuff is dated or that they are asking too much. If you don't want to pay the asking price, there is no reason to comment to the seller at all, just keep shopping. Why be rude about it? 

 

I am sure that you are right and there are plenty of people out there who are just trying to get a deal, There is always that lady at the yard sale asking to give $1 for the leather jacket marked $3. But you might just consider if you are selling it at a rate that is at least a decent amount cheaper  than the original store would sell it for during a good annual sale and taking all shipping charges into account. If not, and someone passes on it, it isn't because they are a cheapskate. It might just be that they are a patient, savvy shopper and will just wait on that annual sale to buy it new for a couple bucks more.

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If things aren't selling then I would look at curriculum resale sites and see what others are selling the stuff for. You can look at ebay but make sure you go to advanced and check what it sold for (price will be green). People often look at list

price and assume thats the going rate but people can list things at any price that doesn't mean it will sell. Also ebay reaches a bigger market so you will get more money for things on ebay vs a little homeschool sale. If you are priced right things should be selling. If not you are more than likely to high or not reaching the right market. You can either lower your price or try ebay.

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Also if its not the current edition it tends to go for a lower price. I recently found an abeka science book at a thrift atore and looked it up on ebay to see how much the TE cost and the book itself was selling for $5 since it was 2nd edition and they are on 4th edition right now.

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I rarely buy used because I think the sellers often have a very overinflated view of what their items are worth. If the used price (including shipping) is over half of the new price and I'm taking the risk of not seeing it in person to confirm it isn't marked in and that it's all really there, I pass. It's not worth it to me and I'd rather just buy new.

 

As a seller, I always list my used stuff on ebay for a minimum price of $1 plus shipping. It will sell for what it is worth - precisely because "what it is worth" is defined as "what someone is willing to pay for it".

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Wow, that was pretty harsh, OP.

 

 

I'm not a cheapskate, and I generally don't pay more than 50% retail for a used item.

 

Why?

 

Biggest reason: 

 
Sometimes, I just can't afford NEW (or nearly new) prices, which is the ENTIRE reason I'm buying USED.  

 

Your item is not brand new.  I pay retail prices for NEW things.  I pay used prices for used things.  

 

I don't have the option of returning it if I change my mind or if it's not quite what I was looking for.

 

I don't know "you" (the seller).  Maybe you're telling the truth about condition, maybe not.  I have bought my share of "excellent condition!!" books that reeked of cigarettes, or had water damage or other condition issues that I am now wary and am unwilling to just take your word for it and pay top dollar.

 

 

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I very rarely buy used anything if it costs more than half what it would new. People are right. Retailers offer sales with free shipping. For brand new stuff. I am not going to pay only $5 less than that for used things. I'll buy new. 

 

My local homeschool store sells their used curriculum for about 50% of retail. They buy those back from parents at 25% of retail. And I get to see what condition it's in and don't have to pay shipping and worry it won't actually make it to me, etc. 

 

I mean, you're saying you'd rather give away your stuff for free (to a thrift store, where it will delightedly be picked up by someone like me for $1-2) than offer it at what the market considers a reasonable price. 

 

And the number one rule of bargain shopping is always ask if they will take less. Not everyone does it, but it is common. If you don't want offers, write that your price is firm and you don't want offers. Most people respect that. :)

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I am so cheapskate that I use the library reference copy. I buy used from Half Priced book stores where I can see the condition of the books and the price is less than 50% of retail price.

 

What has paying more money for used books have anything to do with dignity?

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I buy used. Saving money is way down there on the list of reasons. I've been homeschooling for awhile and there were a lot of quality materials I couldn't afford when they were new that I can pick up inexpensively enough to use as "references" or jumping off points for library and internet rabbit trails now that they are somewhat dated. I also like to help others who were in the position I was in when i had to trade all my "latest and greatest" elementary and middle school curricula for "It'll just have to do" high school curricula.

 

But the biggest benefit I have found for checking eBay and the used curriculum classifieds is too valuable for me not to mention it out of fear of offending you:

 

It puts things in perspective. It reminds me that the dollar bin (or the shredder) is the ultimate fate of all new, shiny, top of the line, hot off the presses droolworthy latest and the greatest.

 

It calms me down and keeps me from spending the rent money on what we don't really need. Sometimes I find bargains, sometimes I help low income families get out of potentially very tight spots, but other times I close the window, take something off my shelf, and play with my kids.

 

 

 

 

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I don't feel like I'm a cheapskate when it comes to homeschooling. I actually tend to buy new because the risk of used curriculum is quite high, particularly when I add in shipping to/within Canada. That risk -- not knowing if the program will arrive, or if it does, in what condition it will be -- means that if I do take the plunge on used books, I never pay more than 50% of the original price. When selling, I start by pricing them at around 40% (maybe 50% at most) of the original cost.

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Just price your stuff competitively and it will sell.  If you don't want to deal with cheapskates, just tell them your prices are firm.  If the prices are competitive, they'll take it anyway or you'll have another buyer in no time.

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I buy mostly new, because it's usually not much more than used, and I very often buy on sale. At the very least, if it won't have a sale, I'll buy when I can get free shipping (I'm looking at you, Singapore math!). New means guarantees and it means getting the absolute most amount I can out of an item before it wears out.

 

I buy used if I can get a really good deal, and that means substantial discount, rather than just a few dollars cheaper. I have had extraordinarily good success, I think, with "used" almost always meaning "really good condition, much better than expected, so I continue to take the chance for a really good deal.

 

I may sell some things when I'm finished with them, but I expect that I will actually just donate whatever is still usable, as a gift to another family, paying forward all the good deals I've gotten.

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Most of the curriculum I KNOW I'm going to use, I wait for a sale from the company.  Most of what I buy used I know nothing about so I don't want to spend a lot on it if it's not going to work because then I would feel obligated to use it.  Like I'm putting together Ancient history for a 1st and 6th grader next year and in scouring threads on whether or not you can beef up SOTW for the 6th grader, I found a schedule for matching up K12's Human Odyssey.  Yup... found it for $1 + $3.99 shipping on Amazon.  I may hate it, but at least I only spent $5 to find out and I can always donate it back to Goodwill for them to sell to someone else for $1 plus $3.99 shipping.  lol 

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I hear you, and second your emotion! I rarely sell anything on this board because people want something you spent your hard earned dollars on for next to nothing. I don't think it is a question of being competitive.

 

I've had much better luck selling on Amazon and eBay.

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No one knows what price you paid. I want the used price to be discounted from what I can buy it new for - not just discounted from list price. That means as a seller, I have to check the current price at discount sale places like CBD and mark down from there. I just bought Apologia books new for 30% off with free shipping. I'll sell them next year for about 40% of list, rather than 1/2 price because Apologia goes on regular sales. Mardel's sends me coupons for 40% off one regularly priced item at least once a quarter. I bought BJU Chemistry that way and again, I will sell it for quite a bit less than 50% of list. 

 

I do find selling used curriculum frustrating because people don't want to pay anything for it. However, I also recognize if my price is only a 10% discount from the price they can get it for on sale - they'd be silly to buy it used. The new books will hold up better and after it has been used once it will resale better for them than my stuff will.

 

I don't think buyers are cheapskates, but those shopping used are trying to save money. That may be because it is the only way they can homeschool. It may be because they are just smart shoppers who don't like to waste money. They are typically shopping hard and know the value of what they are trying to find. You can't blame them for that.

 

If the process is too frustrating, donate your books instead. Many people prefer to do that than deal with the used curriculum shoppers.

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I just give books to people here on the board that I've gotten to know or to homeschool friends in the area. If I were to sell, maybe I would try amazon or price it below 50% on this board. I feel like in the old days when I shopped here, I did get good deals and would want to offer the same to someone else here. The only thing holding me back is media mail nightmare stories, but funny enough, I've sent books to friends from this board and they've all received them. Of course once money is involved, USPS has an uncanny way of knowing it.

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I find it so irritating when I try to sell my used curriculum what absolute nitpicking cheapskates people are!!!  I buy the stuff brand new, use it once and the used buyers want it for more than 50% off what I paid for it or they turn up their noses, or tell me the stuff is a bit dated etc.  Really?!  Why not have some dignity and just cough up a few dollars to educate your kids??  It's what I did, and we were one income and struggling in those days, especially once the kids got to high school.  But I was determined to give them the best.  I think I'll just donate all of my Apologia and other name brand, popular stuff because trying to sell to cheap, nitpickers has me flat out pissed.

 

Did you consider that the people willing to pay more already have by buying new?  You're looking for a niche market of people willing to pay what YOU deem acceptable for used materials. 

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If I wanted to be a true cheapskate I'd send my kids to school. $20 in supplies a year is all I'd have to buy. However, because I homeschool I work only part time. This means I have to be frugal in every aspect of my life. That includes what I purchase in materials. How much I pay for their materials has nothing to do with my love for my children or the quality of the education I'm giving them. 

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