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Why I am leaning towards vintage texts.....


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First of all, yes, it is 4 am and I am up writing this because I have been wide awake in bed for hours and I can't shut down mentally so I figured I might as well get this out of my system.  There are other things going on in my life both physically and circumstancially (is that a word?) that are driving this lack of sleep, so don't think I am up thinking about curriculum because it is just that crucial.  It is fun and comforting in stressful times, though.

 

Ok, I have been exploring different possibilities for a K-8 plan. I decided to not include high school plans until we actually get there and decide where we are at and what needs to be accomplished.  Though my oldest is 13, she is really more like a 5th grader academically than a 7th grader so we have a ways to go before I have to worry about high school level material.  

 

My three plans were:

 

1- RLTL/HLTL/ELTL and Wayfarers.  How to Tutor and Activities for the ALAbacus to Strayer-Upton or Saxon.

 

2- vintage texts for everything (I'll list in a minute)

 

3- some form of SWR type phonics and cursive with HTT and AAA to Saxon and Hake Grammar (not the writing portions until all the grammar books are done) and TruthQuest

 

Ok.  Our family is dealing with two current circumstances in addition to our health issues.  One, money is super tight, we've had a bad year, and we have a lot of digging out to do.  Two, we are considering roadschooling due to some things going on in our state laws and/or as a way to make more money for part of the year where my husband runs a business in another state.  I am looking for a plan that would work should we decide to up and move or go on the road sometime this summer or early fall (we school year round).

 

That being said, plan number 3 would be very hard to carry out because Saxon and Hake are bulky and heavy.  I also would need to soon purchase workbooks for my third child to go with Intermediate 3, plus the ebook of HTT, plus maybe the TM of AAA if I want to update mine (though I honestly don't remember what edition I have in my garage and may not need a new one).  I already have the workbook.  I also have HTT on my Kindle app so I could make do that way.  I don't have TruthQuest or all of the spines and my books are mostly still in boxes from our move in December so it would be hard to get organized.  Obviously I can't take most of the books on the road anyway, so I would need to use ebooks/Kindle books as much as possible and I'm not sure how many TQ books on the booklist are available that way.  So, let's just rule out number 3 for now.

 

I have already mentioned the parts of number 1 that I have for math and what I am missing, although I didn't mention that I only have 1 of the the three S-U books right now.  I now own RLTL 1 and 2 and someone is generously giving me ELTL 1 and 2 combined.  I would have to buy one HLTL book, but the author is giving me the other free when I purchase the first one.  The Wayfarers edition I want to use isn't out yet.  The pros with these are that they are ebooks (please excuse me if I'm not using the correct term) and most of the books from Wayfarers can be put on an electronic device, which we have.  There are a few downsides, though.  One, Wayfarers books add up very fast.  For the first term (I already have the booklist and looked them up), the cost was hundreds of dollars.  I know I could substitute, but I hate doing that and on the road that would be hard because I wouldn't have my library.  Two, ELTL only has books 1-5 out right now and since I only will have 2, that leaves six more to purchase, not including the workbooks.  I'm pretty sure she would have them out quickly and I only need number 4 right now in addition to what I am being sent, but still.  I like hardcover books better and if we aren't going to hit the road I would probably print them all out, which is a pain.  Or I would have to rebuy them already bound.  Three, RLTL phonograms are slightly different than SWR.  This doesn't bother me in theory, but I just spent a whole semester teaching my kids the SWR sounds and rules and when I looked at RLTL 1 closely I was envisioning my kids getting confused or mad at me for changing them.  The word markings would be different based on the new phonograms and that might be a hassle.  I didn't think it would matter, but now I am wondering if it will.  I also would need to acquire the other two RLTL books in the not so distant future.

 

So, by process of elimination, I am thinking more about number 2 (vintage books).  The more I think about it, the more I could see how this would be a versatile option.  I HAVE many of the books on the list in hard copy already.  Almost all of them with the exception of Strayer-Upton and my New England Primer (as edited by Wanda Sanseri) are available for free online.  That means that I don't have to wait to purchase anything except the S-U books and although I would like two copies of each of the three books, I know all of my kids would be in book 1 right now anyway, leaving only one $15 dollar book to purchase for now, which isn't even absolutely necessary, just convenient.  If we hit the road and the hard copies were too heavy or took up too much room, I could choose which to use on electronic devices instead.  We can switch back and forth with little to no hiccups and I can still continue to slowly collect the few hardcover editions I don't have yet as money allows or as I find them places since they aren't all that uncommon at used sales and such.  Lots of people probably have them on the shelf and aren't using them and may be willing to part with them cheaply or in exchange for something else I have that is more modern.

 

So, that being said, here is my list:

Rays Arithmetic (I think I have Primary and Intellectual and the Key to them and the Teacher Guide, still need the rest)

Strayer-Upton (I have the first of the three)

Webster's Blue Backed Speller (I am pretty sure I own this)

McGuffey's 1836 Readers (I think I am only missing the third and fourth reader and the speller)

McGuffeys' Eclectic Readers (I have the whole set)

Elson Readers (I own the Primer and First Reader as found in RLTL, 7 books left)

Primary and Intermediate Language Lessons (I think I gave these away years ago, 2 books)

Harvey's Grammars (I don't think I ever owned these, two books)

New England Primer (edited by Sanseri, I own this already but would like multiples for devotionals)

 

 

Here is a list of books that are not necessarily free but would round these out:

Bibles (figured I just need my Life Application NKJV and a 90 days schedule and a copy of the schedule from MacArthur's Daily Bible)

Hymnals (I already own three, probably need 2 more eventually)

The Country Diary of an Edwardian Lady (own this)

Fine Art book (I have many to choose from)

Drawing Textbook (I own this, super light weight)

Atlas (I have many to choose from, may need to bring U.S, and World or my Trivium Tables)

A Story Bible (I have several to choose from, this could probably also be found online if needed)

Timeline (I will likely use all my VP and A&F cards for this, but I also want a book.  I have one but it probably isn't my favorite so I may want a different one eventually)

my favorite educational theory books that are only in hardcopy (would need to make a list)

 

This leaves me with three other subjects: Latin, Greek, and Music Theory.  These are workbooks with flashcards, cds, and teacher's books.  So, I am thinking that what I may do if we hit the road is just bring the teacher books and flashcards (plus the cds on our electronic devices) and then teach by writing on a chalkboard or writing out their page in their composition book.  I may need to purchase a notebook with staff lines for the music theory , but that shouldn't be too hard to come by in a music store.  In a worse case scenario I would keep the music theory and drop Latin and Greek until later.  Of these, I would still need to buy the music theory TM, two Latin TM, and five Greek TM.  I have the ones we need for Latin and Greek now, though.  

 

Any other reference books would have to be from an online source or in a lightweight paperback, but as long as I am home I can use hardcopy ones I own.

 

 

The other reason I like the idea of the vintage books is that they look pretty on the shelf by our dining room table :-)  They are non-consumable so we just need composition books and sketch books and I don't have to keep buying workbooks, which we can't afford right now anyway and will add up over the years with 8 kids.  

 

For teaching reading, I would use the NEP by Wanda Sanseri.  Here is why (this is a quote from another post earlier today).

 

"Ok, so the NEP of 1777 (edited by the Sanseri's) has six steps for reading in there (single letter, multi-letter, basic words that are listed in there, point out spelling rules in the words, practice reading the words, assign the stories in the beginning of the primer).  It does not have markings on the words or the dictation process, but I have my bookmark for that and the Alpha-List would help me mark them.  I have my phonogram and rule cards for drill.  I already feel comfortable teaching cursive as taught in SWR.  So I think with the NEP, rule cards and phonogram cards, my dictation bookmark, my two cursive charts, and my Alpha-List I could be good to go."

 

From there, they would go into the Elson and McGuffey Readers.  

 

So, I think this makes sense.  I read through the Eclectic Manual of Methods Arithmetic section, so I am looking forward to reading the rest and Sherry Hayes' book when I can afford it.  The MoM and Sherry's blog plus the Beechick guides I have will get me going in the right direction.  I already have lots of ideas.....

 

As for modern books, I already have lots of books at home we can swap out but if we hit the road I will use Medieval Mom's List (most of which are free online I think) for extra literature and we will pick up books on the road as we can afford them when we see them in bookstores or gift shops at the places we visit and then get rid of them or mail them somewhere for when we get back.  I may bring a modern science and history encyclopedia (like Kingfisher or Usborne) for general reference, but those are also heavy so maybe not....I may have very few picture books that I would want to bring, but nothing for sure right now.

 

 

 

 

 

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But you really don't NEED the workbooks for ELTL, and since you're willing to use composition books with the vintage texts, you could just as easily use them with ELTL.  And I went from SWR to RLTL and it wasn't a big deal at all.  Of course I didn't get very far in RLTL because of other reasons, but we're going back to it this next year.

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You don't need the workbooks for ELTL.

 

If you are using free vintage texts, audible.com and have access to eBooks and audiobook downloads from a public library, and read higher and lower than the child's suggested level, you can tweak Wayfarers to cost what you want it to cost. If you are trying to use hardcopy books and want to do it exactly as written it will be expensive and too bulky to take on the road. If you can take a  :chillpill: about levels and use eBooks, Wayfarers can work for roadschooling, especially if roadschooling is more of a parked out in nowhere experience rather than true ROADschooling.

 

Vintage texts are so much less bulky that newer texts. That is ONE generalization I can make about them. But each vintage text must be evaluated individually, just like a modern text. Vintage texts are not a whole; they are individual titles with strengths and weaknesses.

 

My primary reason for using Strayer-Upton is because of lack of bulk. The more I use it, it is going from being an adequate resource to an excellent one. I'm pleased with it. It's getting the job done.

 

Harvey's grammar is nice and small and light in a paperback, and nice to scribble and write in. With added notes from the internet, other curricula, and the Manual of methods, it can be excellent.

 

McGuffey's–it matters what else I'm planning to use. The Mott Media 1836 are good for a KJV/Westminster/Great Books curriculum. The Wiley Revised can be good for a neoclassical/CM. Sometimes I don't use readers at all. Back in the very early 90's I taught my oldest to read with a book we created together by tracing pictures out of his Teenaged Mutant Ninja Turtles coloring book. I've been remembering what I was forced to do because I had NOTHING, and I have been studying methods that don't use readers this week. I'm not sure I'm using any this year. Readers are stories and the stories in both vintage and modern are just...I don't know–blah and irritating to me this week.

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I know I don't NEED workbooks for ELTL, but I also know myself well enough to know that I may want access to them, at least by pdf, but maybe in hand once I see it.  I just won't know until I see it.

 

Also, I have to BUY the rest of ELTL as we need them.  And RLTL.  I can use what I have NOW with hardcopy vintage and get the rest online FREE.  And then, whenever I am ready (and also convinced that it is working well), I can invest in the rest of the sets that I've already been using free.  There won't be any guessing.  And if I have to, I can ditch the hardcopies to go back to the computer screen.

 

Yes, we may be parked in the middle on "nowhere", but we would be taking field trips into DC.  There is a ton to do in that area and having left almost 3 years ago, lots of family (and my sister) to visit.

 

I may ditch Ray's and only use S-U, but I like that it offers a similar, but slightly different approach and has a primary level that S-U doesn't have.  My 8 year old is doing well with S-U so far but we are still working on increasing his speed with the subtraction diagnostic test.  I may even take him back and work a little in Ray's Primary because we are not in a hurry but if he thinks it is too below him I will drop it.  We may do a little of each each day.

 

Seeing someone on a Facebook page post about PLL and ILL helped a lot because I was feeling a little nervous about Harvey's and missing some CM ideas that ELTL uses so putting that piece in made me feel better about grammar/writing or whatever you want to call it.

 

Also, Elson is going to be more for literature, nature, and history content.  Sometimes McGuffey can feel like it focuses more on the character lessons than the other stuff.  I like the character lessons, but I want them to have something in the content areas too frequently enough.  Because I will probably use the spellers and PLL/ILL, McGuffeys will be more for oral reading practice and to fill in whatever holes I want.  This can vary day by day depending on what their other book(s) has/have for them.  There is so much one can do with the McGuffey.  And I like both, so I think I will alternate them.  I do agree that sometimes readers can be frustrating, but I like that they are usually short and sweet enough to get things done while not burning them out from other reading of their choice.

 

I just need something I can commit to as a base so that when we have no money (which seems more and more often these days) or when I have the baby, or if I am in bed hurting, or if we hit the road I can just CONTINUE and make work,  I can increase or decrease the time spent on each lesson or book depending on what is going on and the needs of the child.  It seems so very flexible, but reliable.  If vintage math doesn't end up working then I think the work they will have done will only help them test higher into Saxon rather than making them backtrack.  I need to continue to think about how to make a few things more independent if I need them to be, like when I recover from the c-section.  I can just have them review their flashcards from various areas of the curriculum, and do a lot of reading.  

 

I don't know, I don't think it hurts to try this.  I didn't sleep last night so I am groggy.  But I am going to try out my NEP/SWR with the 6 year old today.  She has been learning cursive connections and just reading stories with silent e's and a few more phonograms in them.   I'm going to pull up PLL for my 8 year old because his language arts lately has only been copywork and reading.  I may not do anything vintage today with the 10 year old and the 13 year old is still out of state.  But I am looking forward to today.  And the hope that FREE curriculum brings to this cash-strapped mom.

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I forgot to say two things.  One, I don't want to use Wayfarers as a topical guide.  I want to use the books she suggests.  If I have to skip some, so be it.  But I don't want to go searching for another book on that topic.  Even if I find a different ebook, chances are I'd have to buy it.

 

And two, there are things I can't control in my life right now (money, finances, laws), but I also have had some quirky tendencies since childhood where I try to control some random, weird thing that no one else understands and probably looks impractical to others.  I am usually pretty good at it being something no one knows about unless they discover it (like my Mom) and it has never been anything that harms me or others.  But, my OCD tendencies in real life are practically undetectable to everyone, including my husband who knows me extremely well and watches me work day in and day out.  So I think keeping things in sets are one of the things that I am feeling a need to control.  So I know that it probably makes no sense to others, but I don't care.  I adapt and adapt and adapt around major life changes around here.  I can have a little control over something, even if it is only lists in my head that I happen to share with you all :-)

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I forgot to say two things. One, I don't want to use Wayfarers as a topical guide. I want to use the books she suggests. If I have to skip some, so be it. But I don't want to go searching for another book on that topic. Even if I find a different ebook, chances are I'd have to buy it.

 

And two, there are things I can't control in my life right now (money, finances, laws), but I also have had some quirky tendencies since childhood where I try to control some random, weird thing that no one else understands and probably looks impractical to others. I am usually pretty good at it being something no one knows about unless they discover it (like my Mom) and it has never been anything that harms me or others. But, my OCD tendencies in real life are practically undetectable to everyone, including my husband who knows me extremely well and watches me work day in and day out. So I think keeping things in sets are one of the things that I am feeling a need to control. So I know that it probably makes no sense to others, but I don't care. I adapt and adapt and adapt around major life changes around here. I can have a little control over something, even if it is only lists in my head that I happen to share with you all :-)

I really understand this. I've learned I do the same. It tends to show up for me in my household management strategies.

I love vintage texts. I have my google play books full of vintage. We actually use them, too!

I think your plan sounds reasonable. I agree with Hunter that vintage texts are best evaluated individually. The nice thing is that becomes possible since they are free !

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I chose these in particular because I know they are available in hard copy and readily available.  Am I missing any that you all know of that are available in hard copy?  I also kind of want them to be the "popular" ones because it is more likely I can find help as needed with them if it is something many people use or get another copy if I lose or ruin one.  I do know of others that Hunter has posted and some listed in the MoM, but I don't want to overwhelm myself more than I have.  

 

It went well with my 8 year old today but it was a little long and he was a little burned out because he had read a chapter book for an hour before we even started.  I am sure there will be PLENTY of tweaking as we go and I will always change things up according to what is in the lessons for that day.

 

I am about to work with the 6 year old after lunch.  

 

Thanks for the encouragement.  I appreciate it, everyone.

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Oh, I meant to say that I can't control health issues, money/finances, or law changes.  But you caught my drift anyway. 

 

And when I said I would use "both", I mean both sets of the McGuffey Readers, but not both at once.  I would alternate them.  I would do Elson daily as silent reading and maybe oral narration or something.  McGuffey more for oral reading and whatever else I need it to do for that particular child.  

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First of all, yes, it is 4 am and I am up writing this because I have been wide awake in bed for hours and I can't shut down mentally so I figured I might as well get this out of my system.  There are other things going on in my life both physically and circumstancially (is that a word?) that are driving this lack of sleep, so don't think I am up thinking about curriculum because it is just that crucial.  It is fun and comforting in stressful times, though.

 

I'm no help for the rest of this, but get some Sleepy Time Extra tea and drink a cup of tea about one hour before bedtime. Also, a little lavender oil on your pillow is helpful. If these aren't enough to shut you down, a hot shower or melatonin might work. Good sleep is more essential to mothering and teaching than the right set of books. I do know what you mean about this, though. Sometimes, I think it's the body's way of giving us time to think without distractions or interruptions. I sincerely hope you find relief for all your stresses and concerns, especially your boy. HTH. :grouphug:

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Stm4him,

 

I get where you are coming from with all the planning.  Really.  We can't control the amount or type of lemons life gives us, but at least we can use a lemonade recipe of our own choosing.  ;)  Hope you can find a recipe that is not too sweet, not too tart.

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I have been thinking today about creativity. When I went through real burn out this winter, I began to lose interest in teaching and learning all together, which has always been the passion of my life. For awhile I didn't want to look at any curriculum at all, which was also totally not normal for me. What I did crave was art and beauty and nature. I wanted a retreat that looked like the past to live in and God gave that to me, to us.

 

Something about vintage texts and no workbooks is refreshing. There is a lot of creativity involved with making your own notebooks (like the ones I posted tonight called love it) and also a lot of freedom to be creative with lesson planning. I think it may help keep me happily using my natural teaching and planning tendencies without relying on someone else's ideas. It gives me a possible fresh angle of homeschooling to share with others and fits nicely with the rest of my visions for our home. Simplicity, quaint beauty, natural. And probably other words that aren't coming to me at the moment.

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Did you look into Gateway to the Classics? It is a curriculum established by the Yesterday's Classics folk, using vintage books in a nice, easy to read format online, complete with lesson plans. I pay $50 a year for it, but am not sure of the price right now. You would need to add math (it sounds as though you have that covered) and I would add in some more current science books, but the rest is really nice to use.

 

We enjoy doing read alouds from it, and I love having the ready-made schedules.

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We have been using vintage texts since DS9 was about 3. They are wonderful, and many we used / are using are on your list. Some quick, general advice:

 

1. Vintage books are dense and concentrated. Sometimes 1/2 a page is a lesson for a day or even two days. Respect that and slow down even though it doesn't look like much.

 

2. As with any book choice, the power of the book is in consistency. Choose a book that YOU can pick up every day for weeks without hurling it across the room. Choose a book that has only as many "pieces" as you can handle happily (workbook, answer key, reference book, web search, etc.). For me, I like each subject (or a couple subjects) in one book or each in one book without needing to reference or use many other books/parts. Vintage books are excellent in that regard.

 

Good luck with whatever you choose. Remember that nothing will be perfect - more than anything, just choose to be done with choosing. Stick with your decision and go with it without questioning it (yourself) again.

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Sticking with something long term is the hardest thing. But I think I am realizing that the more I create my own simple plans vs trying to fit into someone else's program the more likely that I will continue with it. And the more I choose things that don't require constant new purchases or gathering of certain books and supplies the more consistent I can be.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Just a quick update:

 

I am currently using:

 

Ray's Primary

Strayer-Upton 1

CLE Music Theory 1 (until I can buy Alfred's....but these are not vintage)

The Country Diary of an Edwardian Lady

The New England Primer (edited by Wanda Sanseri) w/ SWR and Cursive First cards and charts and Alpha-List

Primary Language Lessons

Hey Andrew 1 and 3 (not vintage)

Latin's Not So Tough 1 and 3 (not vintage)

Bible

Hymnals

Westminster Shorter Catechism Songs by Holly Dutton

 

I set up the board with what they need to do from each book and then set a timer for 15 minutes.  They work intensely for that amount of time and then I check their work.  They are getting quite a lot done this way.  I need to increase the math time for my oldest two for sure, but I wanted to start slow with the vintage.  This works really well and they like it but I also need to try a more independent version for them by just making each child a list of things to do and having them bring me their work either at the end or between subjects.  

 

My friend is sending me PLL and ILL because she doesn't use them.  I have located my McGuffey's except for the Pictorial Primer from the old set.  I am still using the online version of Ray's since I can't find mine and I am still using the words in the NEP until we finish those.  By then I hope to have found my Webster's Speller or have bought McGuffey's Speller (or I can probably find it online.)

 

I bought Sherry's book and read it and really enjoyed it.  I have not incorporated journaling yet into their composition books, but I will soon.  I am still reading the Eclectic MoM.  I haven't found my Beechick teacher guides yet to compare them.  

 

At night we are still reading literature and we are doing our devotionals with just the Bible, hymnals, catechism songs, and the NEP.  I also show them a 2 page spread from The Country Diary and read any quotes or notes or poems from the pages too.  

 

I think I am not going to use the Elson Readers because they are in paperback instead of hardcover like the others.  But I am still thinking about it.  I mainly care about using the vintage texts for the language arts and Math.  I still haven't begun using Harvey's, but I may try to get it in this week.  

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  • 2 months later...

Update:

 

I got frustrated with how long it was taking to work with the kids and how little they seemed to be able to do independently.  So for right now we are using my Robinson Curriculum discs for fiction and nonfiction for two of mine and the other reader is reading whatever on his own because he is already a voracious reader and was fighting my choices from RC.  They also have to read 1/2 hour of Bible or a Bible storybook each day.  

 

All of them are using McGuffey's 1879 books for copywork and spelling right now, and I am using it as a phonics curriculum too with my 5 and 7 year olds.  My SWR phonograms influence how I teach it, though.  These 1879 books are also on the RC discs so still count as RC but I think he just intended for them to be read, not necessarily to be used for phonics, spelling, or copywork (though since they are supposed to copy a page of something each day before age 10 this is an easy, go-to choice.)  

 

We went back to Saxon 5/4 because they seemed to need too much personal attention with the vintage math.  My oldest two are still going very slow with Saxon 5/4 but my third is doing great and he is 8 (2nd grade this year).  We are using the RC answer key and they are learning to check their own, which I go back and double check to be sure.  Eventually I may not feel the need to do that.  My 7 year old is just doing addition and subtraction fact flashcards and my 5 year old is still learning her numbers.  

 

I had a friend suggest Khan Academy to me yesterday so now I am thinking about it in combination with Rays and SU in a more tutoring style, but for now I think I am just going to let them use Khan while I am going through c-section surgery and recovery and see how it goes and then decide what to do after that.  

 

RC comes with a spelling book and a grammar book and I like the look of them because they seem thorough (the grammar book includes diagramming) but concise.  The grammar book uses passages from real literature, which I also like.  I heard some things about the answer key not being correct or missing pages or something so I will have to see how it actually goes when we try to use it.  They look to me like modern books which imitate vintage books, so I may really like them.  We'll have to see.

 

So for now I am planning to stick to RC and then if that doesn't work I may reconsider the vintage texts idea.  I have ruled out RLTL/HLTL/ELTL because I think it would end up being too expensive and that I would eventually not end up sticking with the booklist.  I also think maybe I wouldn't do the Elson readers, but maybe would pick up Yesterday's Classics as money allows.  I am definitely planning to purchase The Book of Knowledge set and The Book of Life set and make regular use of them, but if we were ever to need to hit the road those would be too heavy I am pretty sure.  

 

I do feel confident that I could use the McGuffey's and cover a lot of ground.  But I am a little unsure of how to effectively use Ray's and SU and PLL/ILL and Harvey's.  But for some reason I still think about them.  I had kind of closed my mind to them because I didn't really know what to follow them up with, but I think Khan Academy would maybe work.

 

I honestly also feel that my lack of clarity for what their high school years should look like is holding me back from having confidence in my decisions.  I just don't know what or how much to prepare them for so I just feel a little lost and incompetent.  

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I also dropped Latin and Greek for now.  My first set of goals for skills are the following:

 

Arithmetic

English (spelling, grammar, vocabulary)

Handwriting and Copywork/Dictation (Imitation)

Music Appreciation

Drawing

 

Second set of goals:

 

Advanced Math

Modern Languages

Outlining and Composition

Music Theory

Painting

 

Third set of goals:

 

Science

Ancient Languages

Logic and Rhetoric/Debate and Speaking

Instrument Practice and Performance

3D Media

 

I have goals for their reading content but I don't have them right next to me at the moment.  Maybe if I just focus on getting them to master the levels of goals I will let go of worrying about where they are headed and what will be expected of them, but that is so hard to do.  Part of me wants to pass level 2 goals off onto some online course or a local community college but then I think about how much more expensive that would be and how the quality of learning may not be as good as if they studied it themselves.  Who knows, though, maybe it would be better and worth the money.  

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  • 6 months later...

How is it going? It is helping me simplify if I aim towards preparing for a basic high school option like Ameican School. I thought is throw it out there in case it might help you solidify high school mentally, even if you decide not to go that way eventually.

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I'd love an update from you as well, stm4him.  We are plugging away at Ambleside Online Year 1.  We are doing our Term 1 exams this week.  Today was a snow day so our public school neighbors were home and my son played with them all day.  We'll finish any term 1 stuff and our exams Thurs/Fri and start Term 2 Monday.

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