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WTM coop?


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I'd be happy to find more homeschoolers to discuss curriculum with IRL. 

 

Most of my homeschooling friends IRL have their kids in online public schools. 

 

And many have given up homeschooling (after trying online schools) because its too difficult or takes too long. *sigh*

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I'd love to get chickens, but alas, we don't have any land.

Oh, we don't have any land, either. We just live on a regular size city lot, but we like to pretend we are farmers, we grow several varieties of grapes and peaches, and I want chickens, but dh says we don't have room. He is right, of course. But I still want them.
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Oh, we don't have any land, either. We just live on a regular size city lot, but we like to pretend we are farmers, we grow several varieties of grapes and peaches, and I want chickens, but dh says we don't have room. He is right, of course. But I still want them.

 

I don't even have that much. I *think* if we lived in a fenced yard in this city, we'd legally be able to have chickens. 

 

You know how some cities have community gardens? What if they had something like that for chickens? I'm sure it wouldn't work, but still...

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I don't even have that much. I *think* if we lived in a fenced yard in this city, we'd legally be able to have chickens. 

 

You know how some cities have community gardens? What if they had something like that for chickens? I'm sure it wouldn't work, but still...

 

Well, I have always said the people that live across the street from a large farm have it made. They get to enjoy LOOKING at the rolling acres, farm animals but never have to lift a finger. However, now with your idea of community chickens, I think I want to have a community farm. We can read living books to the chickens and cows. haha

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On topic, though. I am part of a co-op. Have taught a class in co-op and I think WTM methods could potentially be hard. What things DID work for us were more like book studies. For instance, Chocolate Fever book paired with science experiments that all contained a chocolate ingredient. So each week we read, then we got messy and then we ate our mess. Not really WTM, but it did tie in reading with other subjects.

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We have a small SOTW co-op that meets bi-weekly to discuss the chapters, do map work, read some related literature (picture books -- our students are pre-K through 2nd grade), and try out a few big, messy, fun projects that may not get done at home.  Each family takes a turn hosting and planning.  Next year, we plan to meet weekly and add in science/math activities and a time for the students to do presentations.

 

You might want to try starting small with a few friends and just a subject or two to see how it goes.

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It has been a few years, but when the kids were elementary-8 th grade I had a co-op with just one other family. We did WTM history and science. We usually met twice per week for a couple of hours. It worked well until it didn't. Then we stopped. We had three kids at one level and a group of three kids at a younger level.

 

 

I have found starting/running a co-op to be ... Unpleasant. This was a different co-op. Herding cats is a nice way to put it but I'd use more colorful language if I knew you better. ;). And I am talking about the adults. The kids are mostly easy.

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