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Best Terry Pratchett book to start with?


UnsinkableKristen
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I like Reaperman. It is about Death who has been laid off and he decides to take all his unused vacation time.

 

Pratchett also wrote a book with Neil Gaiman, Good Omens. It is a wonderfully hilarious book about the Apocalypse. I recommend it to everyone.

 

I have this!  I forgot that I bought it awhile ago.  Awesome :D 

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Handy chart.

 

Start at the beginning of any of the strands, but it's best to have read both strands before the point where two connect.

:iagree:  :iagree:  :iagree:

 

Seriously, the best way to read Pratchett is as he wrote them.  

 

I cried when I heard he died.  I am not a sappy celebrity follower type but it's just so very sad that there'll never be another Discworld book.

 

ETA: you can read them out of order, but you won't always get the joke.  Plus one particular character changes so much that your first impression of him will be so very different from the last.  

 

-I've read all the Discworld books several times and my favorites are the Guards or Moist von Lipwig stories.

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:iagree: :iagree: :iagree:

 

Seriously, the best way to read Pratchett is as he wrote them.

 

I cried when I heard he died. I am not a sappy celebrity follower type but it's just so very sad that there'll never be another Discworld book.

 

ETA: you can read them out of order, but you won't always get the joke. Plus one particular character changes so much that your first impression of him will be so very different from the last.

 

-I've read all the Discworld books several times and my favorites are the Guards or Moist von Lipwig stories.

Terry Pratchett's daughter helped him with some of the more recent books and he announced awhile back that he intended on leaving Discworld in her hands.
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Wee Free Men was great. There are three books, so less of an undertaking than what I'm sure that chart shows, but still related! Boy, audio book would be great!! Off to check the library.

 

I bogged down somewhere in the chat, but I intend to get back.

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I read them as he wrote them, but stopped when I had kids and started back up again with my daughter at age 9 and read the Wee Free Men. It's one of my favorites. My daughter and I also love Monstrous Regiment. It has a few characters and ideas from the other books but is pretty self-contained. I like Moist von Lipwig and the watch and The witches and Susan. I don't care for the books with Rincewind.

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Terry Pratchett's daughter helped him with some of the more recent books and he announced awhile back that he intended on leaving Discworld in her hands.

Yeah I'd heard that..... Have you read Raising Steam?  I'm going to assume he had help and you can really tell.  It's not that it was bad but it was not the same.  It lacked the lightness and pacing that all of his books have (even the Long Earth books have a definite Terry Pratchett style to parts of them).

 

 Good Omens is excellent and will introduce you to two great writers.

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I read part of Wee Free Men before I had to return it to the library. This page includes publication dates if you need them. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Discworld

 

I'm not sure where to jump back into the series, maybe The Colour of Magic. 

 

Maybe I'll finish Good Omens, had to return it to the library too....I'm sensing a theme on not finishing books, should just buy them. :coolgleamA:

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Yeah I'd heard that..... Have you read Raising Steam?  I'm going to assume he had help and you can really tell.  It's not that it was bad but it was not the same.  It lacked the lightness and pacing that all of his books have (even the Long Earth books have a definite Terry Pratchett style to parts of them).

 

 Good Omens is excellent and will introduce you to two great writers.

 

The type of Alzheimers he had removed his ability to write, he had to use voice software for everything. He was diagnosed after he noticed he was having spelling and typing issues.

 

http://www.theguardian.com/books/2015/mar/15/a-butt-of-my-own-jokes-terry-pratchett-on-the-disease-that-finally-claimed-him

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I love Guards! Guards! as a start -- it's what hooked me after an unsuccessful attempt with a different book (feet of clay maybe? that one really requires some knowledge to enjoy). 

 

Pyramids is also a magnificent book and still one of my favorites. 

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I read Pratchett on my kindle, and when I touch a footnote superscript number, a bubble pops up right in front of me with the footnote in it. It's very very easy for me to read them and then resume the story. I'm surprised to hear that this is not the case for others.

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I read Pratchett on my kindle, and when I touch a footnote superscript number, a bubble pops up right in front of me with the footnote in it. It's very very easy for me to read them and then resume the story. I'm surprised to hear that this is not the case for others.

 

I have an OLD kindle :glare:

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