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College Admissions Requirement (Accredited HS) Xpost

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I am in California, where life is easy for homeschoolers. In looking ahead to college admissions requirements (rising 8th grader) of students coming form an accredited high school has me a bit worried. 

 

 Looking ahead to mapping out high school and thoroughly tracking all of DD's work and grades etc has me worried 

that I will not 1) be able to create a robust enough program and 2) keep track well enough.

 

This has been my first year homeschooling and high school looming ahead is a bit scary. There is a program near me, a charter school, where kids attend two days and do their work at home. I am considering this an an option because they are accredited and I at least I would not have to worry about meeting the standards. But that is not really what I wanted for my DD, I really wanted to choose curricula around her and her interests. But I have to admit that freedom and power is a little bit scary right now.

 
I mistakenly posted this in the writers workshop and got some input, although I have altered my post, but I would like to cast my net a bit wider.
One of my concerns, naturally, is making sure DD is prepared as this is a top dance college and NOT easy to get into.  I don't want to do her a disservice!
 
I would appreciate any feedback or advice from those who have been there!
 

 

 
 

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I'd ask the dance college directly.

 

Even at the state "public Ivies" there is no problem with admissions from non-accredited programs.  Even though the local public high school is accredited, I know that my program is much more competitive than what they would have gotten there.  However, mine aren't looking at a competitive dance college either.  

 

My oldest is graduating this year and would have had no problem with competitive admissions because he has dual enrollment, AP, and SAT II scores plus very high SAT's to back up what we did at home.  That said, he's decided to start at the community college so that he can explore majors and continue his local interests.

 

 

 

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As far as I know it is only the UCs and the Cal State schools that have the draconian "accredited high school" requirement.  Are you looking at one of those schools? Other state unis and private colleges are very welcoming to independent homeschoolers.

 

Many homeschoolers do go the public charter route in high school because they want that accredited diploma. Some of those charters will work with you to create a unique, independent program, so it might be worth asking if they have a pure homeschool track.  Some families go through Laurel Canyon or the other private charters.

 

Some students here on the WTM have tested their way into a UC, taking SAT II subject tests in addition to regular SATs.

 

Others go through community college, starting in high school, and transfer in.  Then others, like our family, just skip the entire California higher education program, and send our kids out of state.

 

Didn't you post here before about this?  I recently mentioned University of Utah to someone who has a budding dancer.  It has an excellent dance department, and is a feeder school for Ballet West.  And I mentioned that it is quite possible to do CC courses while still maintaining a full dance and rehearsal schedule. 

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Jenn, I have asked similar questions, but this one is specifically about meeting accredited standards...and feeling inadequate! I am looking at her high school plan more earnestly now and wondering if I am truly capable of planning and tracking it all.

 

Both U of Utah and Indiana U are schools that we would like to consider...of course DD's plan is to go straight into a company. My goal is to make sure she is prepared for college if that is what needs to happen. 

 

Indiana's website states:

 

High school graduation

You must earn a diploma from an accredited high school (or must have completed the Indiana High School Equivalency Diploma) to be eligible for admission consideration. Students who are homeschooled or attend an alternative school should submit credentials that demonstrate equivalent levels of achievement and ability.

Academic preparation

Applicants should complete at least 34 credits of college-preparatory courses, including:

• 8 credits (semesters) of English, such as literature, grammar, composition, and journalism

• 7 credits (semesters) of mathematics, including 4 credits of algebra and 2 credits of geometry (or an equivalent 6 credits of integrated algebra and geometry), and 1 credit of pre-calculus, trigonometry, or calculus

• 6 credits (semesters) of social sciences, including 2 credits of U.S. history; 2 credits of world history/civilization/geography; and 2 additional credits in government, economics, sociology, history, or similar topics

• 6 credits (semesters) of sciences, including at least 4 credits of laboratory sciences: biology, chemistry, or physics

• 4 credits (semesters) of world languages

• 3 or more credits (semesters) of additional college-preparatory courses; additional mathematics credits are recommended for students intending to pursue a science degree and additional world language credits are recommended for all students

When available, we encourage students to enroll in a challenging curriculum that includes dual-credit, Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB), and/or Advance College Project (ACP) courses.

If your high school does not offer the courses needed to meet one or more of the course requirements noted above, alternative college-preparatory courses may be substituted for those that are not available.

 

Grades in academic classes

Your cumulative GPA, as well the grades you have earned in the 34 courses required for admission, will be an important part of the application review process. If your school computes a weighted GPA and includes this GPA on your transcript, we will consider it for both the admission and scholarship processes.

 

In fall 2014, the middle 50 percent range for GPA for admitted freshmen was 3.47–4.00.

 

Standardized test scores

IU Bloomington requires scores from the SAT and/or ACT; your scores must be sent directly from the testing agencies. We superscore, so we encourage students to test early and often.

 

In fall 2014, the middle 50 percent range of SAT scores for admitted freshmen was 1110–1290 (critical reading and math only), and the middle 50 percent range of ACT scores was 25–30.

 

Other decision-making factors

As part of our holistic review process, we may consider supplemental information—when provided—in addition to the required materials already mentioned. We may take into account any counselor and teacher recommendations, extracurricular activities, community service, work experience, and leadership experience.

 

If you’re a homeschooled student, we encourage you to apply to IU Bloomington!

We individually evaluate homeschooled students on the same basis as students from public and private schools, using the same academic standards. The most important factors we consider are:

• Curriculum (academic course work)

• Transcripts ( grades and cumulative GPA)

• Standardized test scores (SAT or ACT), as described in Step 1 for Freshman Applicants

Transcripts

We realize that the transcripts of homeschooled students may be different from those of traditional high school students. Regardless of format, your transcript should include:

• All courses taken, including those in progress, and the academic year and semester in which each was taken

• Assessment of performance (letter grades, percentages, portfolio commentary, etc.) and an explanation of any applicable grading scales

In some cases, you may be asked to submit additional information describing your curriculum, such as detailed course descriptions and texts used. If you have completed course work concurrently at a high school or college

 

My original question was does DD NEED to be in an accredited school? Now it appears that if it is mapped out properly and thoroughly recorded we should be fine. Right?

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Well I can reassure you that of all of the colleges that dd applied to as a homeschooled student, IU's application process was the most homeschool-friendly. I kept records via transcripts and submitted those, plus test scores and I think the app had one essay question, but that was it--not a big deal at all and she was admitted no problem. Now it would have been nice if there had been a little more merit aid to accompany the acceptance letter, since out-of-state tuition is so ridiculously expensive, but she's quite happy at the in-state school where she ended up instead.

 

All that to say, colleges are really ok with homeschooled students, with many larger schools even having an admissions counselor that specializes in homeschool apps. At IU the admissions guy we met with after our tour was homeschooled himself!

 

 

 

 

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I am in California, where life is easy for homeschoolers. In looking ahead to college admissions requirements (rising 8th grader) of students coming form an accredited high school has me a bit worried. 

 

 Looking ahead to mapping out high school and thoroughly tracking all of DD's work and grades etc has me worried 

that I will not 1) be able to create a robust enough program and 2) keep track well enough.

 

This has been my first year homeschooling and high school looming ahead is a bit scary. There is a program near me, a charter school, where kids attend two days and do their work at home. I am considering this an an option because they are accredited and I at least I would not have to worry about meeting the standards. But that is not really what I wanted for my DD, I really wanted to choose curricula around her and her interests. But I have to admit that freedom and power is a little bit scary right now.

 
I mistakenly posted this in the writers workshop and got some input, although I have altered my post, but I would like to cast my net a bit wider.
One of my concerns, naturally, is making sure DD is prepared as this is a top dance college and NOT easy to get into.  I don't want to do her a disservice!
 
I would appreciate any feedback or advice from those who have been there!
 

 

 

Wait. Your question is really not accredited vs not accredited, because if your dd is enrolled in a charter school, that is a public school, which may or may not be accredited. Have you verified that? California public schools must be accredited by an outside accrediting agency, and it's not automatic.

 

I have no idea of the numbers, but vast numbers of privately educated graduates--and that includes homeschooled students--have applied to and been accepted by scores of colleges, with only the transcripts given to them by their parents--IOW, they were graduated from unaccredited schools and had no problems whatsoever being accepted.

 

Which is also to say that accreditation doesn't mean nearly as much as many people think it does. Sometimes your questions of colleges need to be what their requirements are for grads from unaccredited colleges, or even what they require of homeschoolers.

 

Also, don't overlook the possibility of taking classes at the community college. Even if your dd does graduate with an AA and then apply to college, the fact that she already has some college courses under her belt may be a very positive thing.

 

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I can help you in regards to IU, they (for the most part) love HSer's.  I was HS'ed and attended in the 90's, that was back when they required a GED.  I spoke to them a couple years ago and they no longer need the GED.  They would like to see outside verification of grades but a good score on the SAT (they require it ) is fine.  IU is in Bloomington, which IMO is the best the Midwest has to offer (I'm a little partial to my hometown).  

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