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Holly IN

? about WWE and the next step

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Hello

Not sure if I am posting in the right place.  Couldn't tell if I am supposed to post here or the special needs board.  

 

My dd has HFA and learning issues.  She is supposed to be a Sophomore this fall but not happening for her.  She is in dialectic stage.  Still in WWE 4.  She is struggling with the dictations (even I am too....I can't imagine to remember that much lol!!)  Narrations are ok.  Not great but passable.  

 

I am thinking it is time to move on from WWE.  WWS is OUT of the question.  I want to use other outlining resources so any recommendations for that?  Also what else would you consider for writing to get her up to speed?  She is a very good creative writer.  Educational papers are a no go for her.  She writes stories all the time so no problem in that dept of getting thoughts on paper.  :)  

 

I am considering CAP resources but not sure which one.  Rec's??

 

Also considering Writeshop sources as well.  

 

I need rec's that will push her a bit but not frustrate her.  :)

 

 

Thanks!!

 

Holly 

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She may be maxing out on WWE because of low working memory.  Definitely better to move on.  

 

That's wonderful that she enjoys writing!  The Diana King materials are meant for struggling writers and have plenty of clear structure.  IEW, which I know you've looked at, also has clear structure.  I think, given that you already know she has SN and LDs, you might be happier looking at something meant for that.  

 

http://eps.schoolspecialty.com/products/literacy/writing-handwriting/writing-skills-2nd-edition/about-the-program  Amazon and CBD also have the books.

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My kids are younger (so take with a grain of salt), but my oldest has autism and likes to write and could not manage WWE. I've actually found the writing in R+S English to be quite good, at least at grade 5. For "get her done", this is an outline and a friendly letter, it does pretty well, especially for a kid who doesn't have trouble putting words to paper. It wouldn't be great for a kid who struggled with that. I'm also playing with progymnasmata exercises based on this book

 

http://www.amazon.com/Progymnasmata-Textbooks-Composition-Rhetoric-Greco-Roman/dp/158983061X/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1423829305&sr=1-1&keywords=progymnasmata

 

It's not light reading but clear. I'm just getting started with that, but the fable exercises have been tons of fun. 

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The progymnasmata book.  May I ask what made you decide on this book?

 

Holly

Mostly idle curiosity. There are lots of programs out there, but they are workbooks and sheets to fill out and step by step instructions. And had lots of repetition, or had grammar, or other things I didn't need. I just wanted to supplement what we were doing with progym exercises. This book gave me a "big picture" of what the progym was, and how it was used in the 4-6th century by teachers of the time. It wasn't user friendly or light reading, but it was quite fascinating.

 

So, for example, for fable, the assignments were to rewrite a fable (they suggested memorizing it first) then rewrite in all the verb cases (probably wouldn't do that in English but could try passive vs. active voice). Then rewrite as short as possible (we did this and it was a really neat exercise). The rewrite with as much detail as possible. And a few others. So the kid practices writing with a known story, and can focus on certain skills. 

 

I didn't realize until I read this book that the progym was laid out to teach kids to learn the various parts of a speech as understood in classical times. From that perspective, the exercises make sense. Some are less relevant to modern writing, but most have some interesting applications. And most are very developmentally appropriate for kids in their tweens/teens. There's lots of dramatic condemnation of bad people, and over the top accolades of good people to keep kids amused. The exercises include lots of arguments. The examples are quite funny (Socrates' sex life comes up often). 

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Check out the Write Foundation - totally different approach and has worked wonders with my struggling but creative writers.  Some kids just don't work well outlining and rewriting.  Great organizational skills but sometimes you just have to move on to Plan B.

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Your dd sounds exactly like my ds who also has ASD. WWE was torture for him. At the time we did not have a diagnosis. Now that we do and I have the particulars on processing speed and working memory I realize it I had given him an almost impossible task. We use IEW. The checklist, structure, and clear expectations of the program really help him. It is the only thing that has gotten him actually writing (He writes creatively on his own). That being said, it is still really slow going. Assignments take twice as long as they would a typical child. I just let him work at "his speed" even if this mean getting only half way through the program in one year.

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I sold all of my IEW.  The boys HATED it!!  Never tried it with my dd.  I can probably muster up some materials to teach her from my memory.  Thanks guys!

 

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