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Book a Week in 2015 - BW4


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I probably would have latched onto that too, except that's exactly what I had for dinner tonight!!  Grilled cheese on sourdough bread with swiss and monterrey jack cheese.  :)

 

You're rubbing it in!!! :willy_nilly:

 

:lol:

 

(I think I know what I'm having for lunch tomorrow, though!)

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Apple pie = breakfast of champions!

 

(You're welcome.)

 

:laugh:

 

(And now I want apple pie for breakfast & grilled cheese for lunch. :leaving: )

 

It's like fruit and bread (a traditional breakfast combo) but so much better.

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Apple pie = breakfast of champions!

 

(You're welcome.)

 

:laugh:

 

(And now I want apple pie for breakfast & grilled cheese for lunch. :leaving: )

 

 

At Costco, they have these delicious apple pastries in the bakery... like apple pie inside a croissant. 

 

My son was *begging* for some when we were there on Monday.  I told him no, we wouldn't probably have them until the weekend and they wouldn't be very good by then. 

 

Sigh.  My little guy has foresight, eh??  :)  What I wouldn't give for one of those right now...

 

 

Stacia, I wish we were neighbors, and we would meet for grilled cheese and apple pie tomorrow!!

 

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Stacia, I wish we were neighbors, and we would meet for grilled cheese and apple pie tomorrow!!

 

:iagree:  That would be so fun!

 

And we must add coffee. Coffee goes great with both of those!

 

We will all have to say an imaginary 'cheers' to each other tomorrow as we munch on our apple pies & grilled cheese sandwiches.

 

:cheers2:

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For me, the story has to be really, really, really engaging for me to overlook a *lot* of foul language. An occasional word here and there doesn't bother me. If there is a lot of language to overlook, however, it distracts me from the story.  I keep thinking of alternate ways the author could've worded things so as to be more creative without resorting to cursing.  At the risk of sounding terribly snobby, it doesn't take much effort to use four letter words.  Finding other language to get your point across takes more talent. 

 

And to answer your original question, yes, I see them and I can't help but to say them in my mind. 

 

Edited to add (because I'm afraid I sound so superior about the use of 4 letter words) that in my day-to-day speech, I may, on occasion, slip and let loose with some bad words  :closedeyes:

 

:lol: This is my main argument with my 16 yo son, with whom I chronically lock horns on why he may not use the word "suck" for anything other than lollipops.  "It's a failure of imagination, son."

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This sounds a lot like how I would answer. I barely notice it, and it doesn't bother me. I curse. People around me curse. If it fits the character then it's not intrusive.

 

The only time cursing really bothered me was the opening scene of the movie Pulp Fiction. Dh and I tried to watch it on VHS (yes, vhs lol) and every other word was the F word. We are not prudes. We are not bothered by cursing, not even that word. But that was just over the top to us. We turned it off and returned the movie. People have often told us we should have let ourselves get past it because it would have been worth it. I'm sure they were right, but to this day neither of us has seen the movie nor have we had any desire to watch it.

 

:iagree: Failure of imagination, people.

 

 

BTW, I'm out of likes.  Again.  Because, ration = 100.  So, everyone please count yourselves liked.

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So many posts I'd like to respond to but the lack of multi-quote (which seems to be permanent???) has made me lazy...

 

I remember Captain Kangaroo, in shades of black, white and grey, I might add, but I grew up with the Canadian equivalent, Mr. Dressup and his pals Casey and Finnegan :D Stacia, red hair brought an immediate image of Ronald McDonald, too.

 

Coarse language in books...context is everything.

 

More later, out the door for ds's piano lesson.

 

TTFN :seeya:

 

I know, right?  It makes me lazy, and also it inhibits multi-faceted iterative conversation.

 

Between this AND the likes ration, I'm starting to suspect that Dr. Evil has taken over the policy-making generation amongst the WTM policymakers.

 

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Add me to the people who will be having grilled cheese today. As for apple pie.....depends on if I have the time/energy to make one. I'll be making 2 cakes over the weekend for birthdays so maybe pie would be overkill. Or not. 

 

 

I read The Strange Library yesterday. So now I can check off having read our author of the this month. Won't be reading more of him though. Strange dude. 

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My book journal is still AWOL, sigh... I suppose I'll have to go out and get a new one, but I am very loathe to do so...

 

Anyway I wandered around the house picking up books strewn about in various corners, which arguably should have been done anyway, and came up with:

 

The Painted Alphabet, by Diana Darling.  Stacia, this was one of yours?  (My journal is lost, so the source of ALL recommendations is lost as well, so please forgive me if it was someone else... in any rate, it has a very Stacia feel to it). It's set in Bali, a more-or-less modern story which is "based on a Balinese Tale," with the suggestion (?) that the tale is often enacted in traditional shadow puppet form.  Mostly realistic with just enough sorta-magic-realism to make me associate it with Stacia, lol... I thought it was lovely.

 

Women of Sand and Myrrh, by Hanan al-Shaykh.  I'm not sure how this one came to be amongst my towering stacks... a collection of interlinked stories, set in an unnamed Gulf nation (reminded me most of Kuwait), following the lives of a woman from Lebanon, from (whatever country it was), and from Texas.  The writing was quite good but the characters each were so cloying self-absorbed and claustrophobic, and stories themselves were so... desolate... that the book left me feeling quite emptied-out...

 

Essential Sufism, edited by James Fadiman and Robert Frager - I'd read this a couple of years ago; re-read it for my IRL interfaith book group.  It is a collection of mostly quite short passages from mostly medieval (with a sprinkling of modern) Sufi masters.  Extremely lighthearted and accessible; a good portal.  Here's one of my favorites:

 

Bahlul, the wise fool, happened to meet the caliph Harun al-Rashid.  â€™Where are you coming from like this, Bahlul?’ the ruler asked him.

‘From Hell,’ was the prompt reply.

‘What were you doing there?’

Bahlul explained, ‘Fire was needed, Sire, so I thought of going to Hell to ask if  they could spare a little.  But the fellow in charge there said, ‘We have no fire here.’  Of course I asked him, ‘How come?  Isn’t Hell the place of fire?’  He answered, ‘I tell you, there really is no fire down here.  Everybody brings his own fire with him when he comes.’

 

Then, Ani Maamin: A Song: Lost and Found Again, by Elie Wiesel.  This is a short volume of really indescribable form... it's layers on layers on layers... The title means "I believe" and refers first to the traditional morning prayer, which in turn rolls in 13 principles of faith... After the Holocaust Wiesel wrote this as lyrics for a cantata (music by Darius Milhaund) for Carnegie Hall in 1973... so it reads as a combination poem / play, telling a story of how during the Holocaust the patriarchs Abraham Isaac and Jacob went to God to speak to Him about what was happening below and to rouse His compassion... yet He chose to remain silent... Ultimately the patriarchs decided to leave Heaven and join their people below to share their fate... and, well, I can't summarize the ending wrt to God because it's ambiguous enough that different readers will read it differently... Anyway, it takes the breath away even just in written form, which is not the form it was designed for... It was Holocaust Remembrance Day a few days ago, and I tried and failed to find some way to convey the power of what it conveyed to me, to my college daughter... the (French) cantata is

but doesn't do the trick emotionally even if you can follow the French, which I can't really even with the English right before me...
 (disturbing images alert) is wholly different but starts to approach the feel of it...  Anyway.  Knock me over with a feather.

Then, a doorstop of a book, The Better Angels of our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined, by Steven Pinker... After the above I'm too pooped out to describe another tour de force of an entirely different sort, making a wholly different type of impact, but, wow.  Really, really worthwhile.

 

Currently:  I'm slogging through Ulysees, not sure it's worth it (gasp!!)... very much enjoying Extraordinary Renditions by Andrew Erwin, which I presume came from Jane?  (So sorry re: I lost all my recommendation notes.)  It has a very Jane-y feel.  I took Murakami's Kafka on the Shore out of the library at Robin's orders, and it has been staring at me accusingly ever since, and I am acutely aware that January is nearly over... but I'm afraid unless Ulysses surrenders it's not going to happen....

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I continued my Amy Harmon run by re-reading Making Faces; this was the first book of hers that I read last July.  I enjoyed it again though I'd forgotten how it had me crying about every fifty pages.

 

"Ambrose Young was beautiful. He was tall and muscular, with hair that touched his shoulders and eyes that burned right through you. The kind of beautiful that graced the covers of romance novels, and Fern Taylor would know. She'd been reading them since she was thirteen. But maybe because he was so beautiful he was never someone Fern thought she could have...until he wasn't beautiful anymore. Making Faces is the story of a small town where five young men go off to war, and only one comes back. It is the story of loss. Collective loss, individual loss, loss of beauty, loss of life, loss of identity. It is the tale of one girl's love for a broken boy and a wounded warrior's love for an unremarkable girl. This is a story of friendship that overcomes heartache, heroism that defies the common definitions, and a modern tale of Beauty and the Beast, where we discover that there is a little beauty and a little beast in all of us."

 

Here's a review  and a second review.. 

 

Regards,

Kareni

 

Thanks for this recommendation. DEVOURED it yesterday and can't get it out of my head this morning. Looking forward to reading more by this author.

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Women of Sand and Myrrh, by Hanan al-Shaykh. I'm not sure how this one came to be amongst my towering stacks... a collection of interlinked stories, set in an unnamed Gulf nation (reminded me most of Kuwait), following the lives of a woman from Lebanon, from (whatever country it was), and from Texas. The writing was quite good but the characters each were so cloying self-absorbed and claustrophobic, and stories themselves were so... desolate... that the book left me feeling quite emptied-out...

 

This author has a rather avant-garde version of the 1001 nights tales that's been in my tbr list for over a year now. Avant-garde is probably the wrong descriptive to use, more like unexpurgated of its more traditionally erotic components. It's quite a ribald series of tales that were thoroughly sanitized for a Victorian audience when it was translated initially.
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This author has a rather avant-garde version of the 1001 nights tales that's been in my tbr list for over a year now. Avant-garde is probably the wrong descriptive to use, more like unexpurgated of its more traditionally erotic components. It's quite a ribald series of tales that were thoroughly sanitized for a Victorian audience when it was translated initially.

 

(Like) *

 

Were you the one who recommended Sand and Myrrh, then?  I didn't consider it to be especially ribald... as I said upthread, I admired the writing but found it to be quite bleak; I expect I'd enjoy the author more if  the content were lighter.  Which, I dunno re: 1001 nights - I think all the versions I've ever read were fairly sanitized...

 

 

 

ETA to add:   *  You know, it occurs to me, that if we had an emoticon for LIKE, we could effect a work-around on the ration = 100.  When it was, you know, important.

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... Amy Harmon ... Making Faces

 

 

Thanks for this recommendation. DEVOURED it yesterday and can't get it out of my head this morning. Looking forward to reading more by this author.

 

I"m glad you enjoyed it, trinchick.  I've found all her books to be unique and compelling.  I'm eagerly waiting for my library to get her first two (the Purgatory books) as well as her most recent.  Happy reading!

 

Regards,

Kareni

 

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Noooo.... you're giving up on Karamozov?  Me, I am right.on.the.edge of giving up Ulysses.  I feel like it's just washing over me without making any impact whatsoever.  The individual sentences are masterful but it's still not coalescing into an experience, if that makes any sense.

 

I've been off the threads because I lost my writing journal more than a week ago.  I didn't worry about it because mostly always such things reappear in a couple of days, but it hasn't yet.  I suppose I'll have to wander around the house and pick books off the floor to remember what I've read, sigh.

 

I tried. Nothing was happening and it was incredibly boring.

 

As for Ulysses, I'm trying to find a reason not to give it up. I don't like stream of consciousness writing. My brief encounters with Virginia Woolf and Faulkner should have taught me that. 

 

Sorry about your journal. Have you found it yet?

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My book journal is still AWOL, sigh... I suppose I'll have to go out and get a new one, but I am very loathe to do so...

 

 

 

Don't give up hope yet!  I'll ask St. Anthony to find it for you.  

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(Like) *

 

Were you the one who recommended Sand and Myrrh, then? I didn't consider it to be especially ribald... as I said upthread, I admired the writing but found it to be quite bleak; I expect I'd enjoy the author more if the content were lighter. Which, I dunno re: 1001 nights - I think all the versions I've ever read were fairly sanitized...

 

 

 

ETA to add: * You know, it occurs to me, that if we had an emoticon for LIKE, we could effect a work-around on the ration = 100. When it was, you know, important.

.

 

Nope, t'weren't I who recommended that. The version of 1001 I referred to is available on kindle so you can download a sample to see how you go with it.

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I"m glad you enjoyed it, trinchick.  I've found all her books to be unique and compelling.  I'm eagerly waiting for my library to get her first two (the Purgatory books) as well as her most recent.  Happy reading!

 

Regards,

Kareni

 

 

My library network, which is usually pretty good, doesn't have any of her books. I rarely buy books but I'm willing to shell out for these ones.

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I tried. Nothing was happening and it was incredibly boring.

 

As for Ulysses, I'm trying to find a reason not to give it up. I don't like stream of consciousness writing. My brief encounters with Virginia Woolf and Faulkner should have taught me that. 

 

Sorry about your journal. Have you found it yet?

 

Re: Ulysses and stream of consciousness writing: Yeah, it sounds altogether too much like the voices I already have in my head, lol.  I mean, a very good bit more erudite of course, and speaking in a good bit more more tongues.  But really, when one already has as many in there as I already do, who needs more??  I'm giving it a few more days.

 

Re: my journal: No, sigh.  I'm waiting on St. Anthony, though.  Will report in due course.

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:cheers2:  Cheers, Cris & all my BaW friends as you have your lunch today! I just finished my grilled cheese (flaxseed bread with smoked Gouda, tomatoes, & cilantro) & am finishing my coffee along with some clementine slices & dates (which will have to stand in as my apple pie today) while I check in with you. How many of you have had or are having grilled cheese for lunch? :lol:

 

Pam, so glad you enjoyed The Painted Alphabet. I thought it was lovely too. I know I mentioned Extraordinary Renditions & agree w/ you that it seems a "Jane" book.... Hopefully your reading journal will pop up soon! Have you checked all the weird places like the pantry, on top of the dryer, in the car,...? Maybe a snowman is reading it? Oh, and Mike Myers! :lol:

 

Interesting reading the Ulysses comments. That's something I've wondered if I want to read or should read, but just haven't yet. Hmmmm.

 

Onceuponatime, that's good to know about Thomas Paine. He'd be a great one for banned books week, for sure.

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Stacia re: grilled cheese:

You get bonus points for your creative and very yummy sounding grilled cheese!  Over the last couple of post-op recovery weeks I've had my dh make me a good old fashioned cheddar-on-white bread grilled cheese with slices of apples on the side.  Don't know about today -- I just finished breakfast!  (nutty peanut butter and a tart Scottish orange marmalade on toasted English muffins...)

 

Pam re: stream of consciousness writing and voices inside your head:

Hang on a minute. What are you doing inside my head? 

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I'm back. :)  I had to stay away from the "Book a Week" threads until I finished the Homeschool High School Physics thread for the high school portion of the board - you people and your discussions are too fascinatingly distracting. :D

 

Might I ask a favour from those of you who are writing gurus?  I posted an essay in the "High School Writing Workshop" portion of the board that my dd had written for me back in the fall and I'm looking for a bit of feedback.  I know that I'm a math/science person and my ability to teach writing is very limited - we'll probably outsource dd's language arts stuff for next year.  I'm just wondering if there are a few things that could be pointed out to me (and her) in her essay as things she could work on improving.  If someone felt able to help us out, that would be wonderful. :)

 

Still working on "Misquoting Jesus" and "Misquoting Truth".  Also still working on "Molecules at an Exhibition".  "The Circle" should be on its way to me now so hoping to start that as soon as it gets here.

 

Now to go back and read as much of the missed "Book a Week" threads as I can... :)

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Currently:  I'm slogging through Ulysees, not sure it's worth it (gasp!!)... very much enjoying Extraordinary Renditions by Andrew Erwin, which I presume came from Jane?  (So sorry re: I lost all my recommendation notes.)  It has a very Jane-y feel.  I took Murakami's Kafka on the Shore out of the library at Robin's orders, and it has been staring at me accusingly ever since, and I am acutely aware that January is nearly over... but I'm afraid unless Ulysses surrenders it's not going to happ  en....

 

Nope, that would be a Stacia recommendation, but definitely a book in which I am interested. 

 

My latest audio book (i.e. car book) was one that I have not seen mentioned in these threads, After Dark, my first Murakami.  Not sure what my expectation was but I can report now that I liked the plot but disliked the use of the camera eye/point of view device.  It is presented as the omnicient eye but it is not since we are forced to examine only those things that the author wants us to see through the lens--and when he wants us to see them. There is something blantantly manipulative about it that bugged me.  Personally, I could have used more resolution.  While I am not inspired to dash off to read more Murakami, I am not completely turned off by him either.  I mention this because it seems that people are particularly keen on him--or not. I am more ambivalent.

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re: Extraordinary Renditions, by Andrew Ervin:

...

 

Pam, so glad you enjoyed The Painted Alphabet. I thought it was lovely too. I know I mentioned Extraordinary Renditions & agree w/ you that it seems a "Jane" book.... Hopefully your reading journal will pop up soon! Have you checked all the weird places like the pantry, on top of the dryer, in the car,...? Maybe a snowman is reading it? Oh, and Mike Myers! :lol:

 

Interesting reading the Ulysses comments. That's something I've wondered if I want to read or should read, but just haven't yet. Hmmmm.

....

 

(like)

 

It was you!  Jane, I'll send it along when I'm done, then.  Really you must.  The first story especially, which I think Jenn might like as well (the narrative is written from inside a composer's head and works its way eventually to how his life has shaped his compositional method).

 

 

Stacia, you might well experience Ulysses totally differently from me and LF, given that you don't yourself ordinarily have all these voices in your head!

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I think Jenn would enjoy not only the first section of Extraordinary Renditions but also, *especially*, the third section (a musician).

 

Sometimes I have voices in my head. They are chanting, "Eat grilled cheese!" :lol:

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re: Extraordinary Renditions, by Andrew Ervin:

 

(like)

 

It was you!  Jane, I'll send it along when I'm done, then.  Really you must.  The first story especially, which I think Jenn might like as well (the narrative is written from inside a composer's head and works its way eventually to how his life has shaped his compositional method).

 

 

Stacia, you might well experience Ulysses totally differently from me and LF, given that you don't yourself ordinarily have all these voices in your head!

 

Wow, Pam.  My library does not have this book so I would appreciate borrowing it from you.

 

No grilled cheese for me today.  Instead I ate leftover homemade soup (Gypsy Soup from the Moosewood Cookbook).  Can I say that I was nonetheless ahead of the curve since I made apple cobbler a couple of days ago?

 

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After all the build up in my mind, I didn't have grilled cheese.  I realized I had leftover pasta in the refrigerator, so I had that instead.  It was pretty good, and after all I did get a grilled cheese last night.

 

There's always lunch tomorrow.  :)  And I do think I'm bringing home an apple pie tonight.  (No time to make one today.)  Oooh, Jane's apple cobbler sounds good too.  I make apple crisp sometimes.

 

Happy birthday to Thomas Paine!!  I have a couple of his writings on my list for this year.

 

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I feel like I'm sitting in on a group meditation on the power of cheese to affect the collective not-so-unconscious... :lol:

 

And since we're all reporting on parts of our culinary day...I was all set to have some chocolate and a cup of tea for lunch--comments on the nutritional nature of this repast can be kept to oneself thank you ;) -- but all of a sudden I got a hankering for cheese. Seriously. So the pot of tea was put aside, full I might add, and instead I had brie, some sliced charcuterie, a handful of nuts and some chilled vegetable juice for lunch. Here's where gifs would come in beautifully. Sigh.

 

I shall be meeting up with the tea and chocolate at a later point in my day!

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I feel like a huge culinary failure due to no grilled cheese for lunch. I actually forgot lunch but have snacked on plain old chocolate carmel Easter Eggs from Galaxy. The dc's went foraging and had left over croissants with nutella which is the latest favorite food, ds wouldn't eat it a month ago now two jumbo jars are empty!

 

I did make a visit to Flufferton Abbey and read Seven Nights in a Rogue's Bedhttps://www.goodreads.com/book/show/13512914-seven-nights-in-a-rogue-s-bedwhich definately had adult content.

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All this talk about cheese!   I went with a cheese enchilada and a taco salad instead. 

 

I thought St Jude was the patron saint of lost causes - we'll put in a word with him to help pam find her notebook. 

 

Finished A Case of Two Cities by Qiu Xiaolong and  taking a fluff break with Seal of my Dreams anthology.

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Sometimes I have voices in my head. They are chanting, "Eat grilled cheese!" :lol:

 

My voices are more choco-centric!

 

 

Currently reading and enjoying

Burying Water: A Novel (The Burying Water Series) by K. A. Tucker

 

"Left for dead in the fields of rural Oregon, a young woman defies all odds and survives—but she awakens with no idea who she is, or what happened to her. Refusing to answer to “Jane Doe†for another day, the woman renames herself “Water†for the tiny, hidden marking on her body—the only clue to her past. Taken in by old Ginny Fitzgerald, a crotchety but kind lady living on a nearby horse farm, Water slowly begins building a new life. But as she attempts to piece together the fleeting slivers of her memory, more questions emerge: Who is the next-door neighbor, quietly toiling under the hood of his Barracuda? Why won’t Ginny let him step foot on her property? And why does Water feel she recognizes him?

 

Twenty-four-year-old Jesse Welles doesn’t know how long it will be before Water gets her memory back. For her sake, Jesse hopes the answer is never. He knows that she’ll stay so much safer—and happier—that way. And that’s why, as hard as it is, he needs to keep his distance. Because getting too close could flood her with realities better left buried.

 

The trouble is, water always seems to find its way to the surface."

 

I'm about three quarters of the way through the book.  I hadn't known it was the start of a series until I copied the above.  Now I'm wondering if I'll be left with a cliffhanger.  I hope not.

 

Off to make a pb&j for lunch.  I had melted cheddar cheese on my husband's homemade wheat bread toast for lunch yesterday.

 

Regards,

Kareni

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I am not a big fan of grilled cheese unless it is dressed up with an extra like tuna  or salsa,  then I enjoy them.

 

I finally finished  The Imitation of Christ  (lovely book, one that I will revisit many times in the future)  and am now embarking on a rabbit trail about the Benedictine Monks.  Right now I am reading  Saint Benedict  by Julian Stead.  Looking forward to this literary aside.

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Done with lunch and back to work. Will leave you with these:

 

Why Translate -  from author Herbert Lomas:  Long but well worth reading

 

What I’m suggesting is that people read to experience themselves imaginatively: they want a new perspective on their own lives. People do not read translations to encourage minor literatures but to rediscover themselves in new imaginative adventures and revealing extensions of experience. If books from other cultures are to succeed in translation, it will not so much be because of their local colour, but because the problems and anxieties that the readers are experiencing in their own lives are illuminatingly developed in these translations too.

 

 

 

 

Victorian Premier's literary Awards for 2015 - best Australian writers for fiction, nonfiction,etc.

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It is my day for finishing books.

 

Twenty Thousand Saints by Fflur Dafydd came my way via Stacia. This novel is set on Ynys Enlli or Bardsey Island (off the coast of Wales) home to seals, sheerwaters, and hermits, as well as the mythical 20,000 saints. The setting was great but there almost seemed to be too much story in this book! Too many people in search of redemption of the sort that an island is supposed to bring. (Hah!)

 

I also read The Secret Adversary which I never would have finished had this not been an Agatha Christie. This was her second published novel (1922! What a writing career!) and the book that introduces Tommy and Tuppence. Granted, I am not a particular fan of this duo, but I was curious how they got their start. The Secret Adversary seems pretty cheesy by modern standards (lacking grilled cheese in my life, I'll toss in an adjective :D ).

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The Secret Adversary seems pretty cheesy by modern standards (lacking grilled cheese in my life, I'll toss in an adjective :D ).

 

I approve!

 

 

I finished Burying Water: A Novel (The Burying Water Series) by K. A. Tucker which I'd mentioned earlier.  I enjoyed it.  My fear of it being a cliffhanger has not been borne out; I'm guessing that future books in the series will feature other characters who played minor roles in this book.  While I enjoyed the book, be aware that it has adult content plus content that may be troublesome to some readers.  Spoilers: spousal abuse and rape (both recounted rather than witnessed by the reader), infidelity

 

Regards,

Kareni

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All this talk about cheese!   I went with a cheese enchilada and a taco salad instead. 

 

I thought St Jude was the patron saint of lost causes - we'll put in a word with him to help pam find her notebook. 

 

Finished A Case of Two Cities by Qiu Xiaolong and  taking a fluff break with Seal of my Dreams anthology.

 

NONONONONononononononoono.....

 

St Jude = lost CAUSES

 

St Anthony = lost ITEMS

 

 

please please please don't tell me my journal is a case for St Jude!!!

 

I continue to hold out hope.  True, it has taken longer than our typical lost item, but now that Amy has enlisted the Force I'm confident it will turn up soon.  Well, hopeful anyway.

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NONONONONononononononoono.....

 

St Jude = lost CAUSES

 

St Anthony = lost ITEMS

 

 

please please please don't tell me my journal is a case for St Jude!!!

 

I continue to hold out hope.  True, it has taken longer than our typical lost item, but now that Amy has enlisted the Force I'm confident it will turn up soon.  Well, hopeful anyway.

 

Pam, here's a phrase my eccentric, artist aunt likes to use, personalized just for you :D

 

Book journal, book journal where are you?

You know where you are, tell me, too!

 

You need to wander around the house periodically saying this out loud for it to work its magic!

 

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