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Kinsa

UPDATED: Does anyone on this board have a NON-superstar high school student?

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You are not alone.  None of my dc did any AP, dual enrollment or CLEP exams.  My oldest dd will be graduating this spring from college with a degree in psychology and is currently working part time in a job she hopes to continue after graduation.  My middle dd is currently a sophomore in college studying English with a minor in marketing.  She made dean's list this semester.  Both of these girls disliked school while we were homeschooling but are very successful now.  I am finishing up homeschooling my ds.  He is a junior and is considering a math degree or an accounting degree.  He has no desire for any "extras" in high school.  He is working a part time job that takes about 24 hours of his week on top of his high school course load.

 

I used to compare myself and our homeschool to what I would read on the boards.  I tried unsuccessfully to implement some things I saw others doing and they always seemed to flop with my dc.  I think many of these kids are self motivated and push themselves as it is something they want. I tried to provide my dc with a solid college prep education and I think we have been successful.  You said it yourself, you have a great kid!  Focus on his strengths and everything will fall into place as it should.

 

Chris

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Sometimes I wish posts could just say "Ego Brag Alert..."  I know with posting about my college daughter, I feel like I get that way.  I know she is "smart" but not super star genius.  no AP, no outside classes.  DE? ha. did church volunteer work in high school and college. (things like scrubbing windows in the building). Oh, I can put a spin on it and make it sound more.  and her work study job, I can spin that too.

 

but here's my other children... 

Middle daughter:  her super star student qualities:  Kindness. school is average for her. I don't see the ACT in her future though. She actually likes doing school, but it doesn't mean it's easy for her. Her cat loves her. and when I was exhausted from yard work, she took care of me.

 

youngest daughter:  I'm confident she brings down the homeschool GPA.  her super star skill: she can follow a recipe and cook. (age 12).  and she can read the lasagne instructions on the box, so we had supper on time yesterday even though I was exhasuted from yard work and middle gal was taking care of me.   her other super star skill:  she is willing to learn how to play piano. She's not super star or savant.  And she likes to wave to people at church. So they let her be a hostess for half an hour once a month.  weird looking kid with autism and the big smile "hi.. happy new year.. hi.  welcome to hope.. hi have a nice week. thanks for coming. see you next time."    oh, isn't that super star?   well to me it is.  Because at age 4 she wasn't talking at all.

but on this forum?  most kids did that in the womb, right?

 

tell me about the super star stuff in your son...   he is GREAT..  I want to hear your mommy smile moment in him.. 

 

((hugs))

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I have one of each. Older likes to hide his abilities, doesnt want to work hard academically, and detested high school. He has excellent people skills. He will go farther on those than his sib will on his talents...he has come to realize that he has to step up his college game academically or he will be working in the convenience store instead of interning for the summer. Most high school teachers assumed they were cousins, lol. The high school math teacher was the only one he couldnt fool, lol and she pinned him to the wall on work ethic.

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Yep.  Although my kids are dual enrolling, it isn't because they are geniuses.  It is just pretty normal for homeschoolers to do here.  

My oldest is just a B student, with no real goals past CC.  In fact, I'm going to throw a party if she finishes that.  She really, really just wants to get married someday and be a mom.   :)  

One of my twins has no desire to go beyond CC either, and is going into the culinary program.  It makes her happy and I'm good with that.  

The other twin is more driven academically and does well.  I think it is personality as much as ability.  She plans on going into a STEM field which needs a tougher academic load.  (The other two are horrified by the idea..lol)

 

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Yes, my son is average academically. He has some quirky interests that homeschooling allowed us to explore. He also has a pretty large lifestyle goal and is more interested in pursuing that than a specific degree at this point. He's very much a path of least resistance type of guy in most everything. 

 

He took the ACT and got a score that will get him where he wants to be. He has some issues on the day of the test, and could do better if he tried again. He has no desire to retest and I'm not going to force him. 

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1) I see lots of posts about average or below average students especially in math

2)  I see some replies that don't have much common sense 

       example:  OP says their child is not good in or does not like math then somebody replies with try AoPS  because their child uses it  !@$!

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Nope, you are not alone. Neither of mine are even interested in college. My oldest graduated with the bare necessities in the main subjects and lots of great reading. My youngest (junior now) is a bit better in math, but I still doubt she will go any further than algebra. They each have their own interests and things they are good at though, so I am pleased. 

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QUOTE: "tell me about the super star stuff in your son... he is GREAT.. I want to hear your mommy smile moment in him.. "

 

 

He really is a great kid. His strengths seem to be people-skills and athletics. He has a lot of friends and is quite social. He earned his letter jacket in football last week.

 

He is a superstar in scouts. For the last few summers, he's been a camp counselor all summer long. At the end of the summer they always tell me how great he is at his job, and they request him back each summer.

 

Yet he also has a tender heart. He has great compassion and patience with our special-needs son. Of all his brothers, our SN son prefers him. It melts my heart to watch them interact.

 

I know he'll find his niche in life. But still, it's a bit disappointing to know he isn't college-bound, but I suppose that's my own issue. I realize that's my prideful self getting smacked down. (LOL)

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I know he'll find his niche in life. But still, it's a bit disappointing to know he isn't college-bound, but I suppose that's my own issue. I realize that's my prideful self getting smacked down. (LOL)

a 2 year degree is still college if he so choses that route in the future - maybe after service

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GW is going to start job skills training at a local movie theater. He'll go with his trainer for about an hour to begin with and learn how to clean the theaters between shows. The major hurdle will be the down time waiting between the end of each movie. I hope he likes the job.

 

I don't post here about GW because his schooling is pretty far outside the main stream of high school. I don't really need an algebra or biology book for him. I need to find him a nice group home that can deal with low-frequency, high-intensity aggression. It's just a completely different experience than it is educating an average or bright teen.

 

This board is great, but it has a fairly narrow focus. In fact, that's probably why it's great.

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a 2 year degree is still college if he so choses that route in the future - maybe after service

We are scheduled for two campus visitations in February, plus a session with the recruiter. We'll see which direction he chooses.

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I think it's more that the "superstar" posts tend to stand out in our minds, simply because some of these kids and their accomplishments are so amazing. 

 

Posts (and the students they are about) really range all over the spectrum. I'd be surprised if a day goes by without someone asking for a "git-'er-done" book, whether they should step in or let their kid fail, and so on. 

 

When we're hanging out with local homeschool friends, dd can seem like a bit of an academic superstar. When I'm on this board, definitely not, lol. 

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There is a teacher-blogger who describes what you're talking about as "Sports Center blogging".

 

When you watch the summary of a baseball game on Sports Center, it's exciting -- amazing home runs, great fielding, etc. But, if you were actually at the game, there's tons of other less exciting stuff -- the guy who bores you by fouling off 7 pitches in a row before finally looking at a 3rd strike, etc. And no electric guitar soundtrack in the background, either.

 

On the internet, people seem to present their best "SportsCenter" self -- but their day to day life is more mundane. The fact of the matter is, when you see someone's SportsCenter post, that doesn't represent the real day-to-day life in that homeschool.

 

I would personally take the "here are all the great things we're going to do next year!" planning posts with a grain of salt -- the best laid plans and all that. I personally have never finished a curriculum "on time." For math, we keep going to the end of the book then open the next one, but for many courses, we've left the last few chapters undone.

 

Another thing to do is look at the college acceptances lists for various homeschool groups. Yes, there are a few kids going to the very top schools, but most of the kids are accepted to more modestly competitive places. And, the parents are just as proud, too.

 

SWB's kids were clearly very gifted to be doing college level reading lists at 7th grade and I think her website does attract families who share that experience and need for challenge. But most kids do have wonderful things to share with the world, even if they aren't in the top 1% of IQ bell curve.

 

Your son sounds like a wonderful young man, and there's nothing wrong with being proud of his character and service ethic. He'll find his way without the Harvard degree, as most kids do. There is room for less than 1% of any high school graduating class in the Ivy League anyway.

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Not there yet but yes, my youngest son is most definitely not a scholar.  He is a bright kid but has zero interest in academics and so high school will most likely be wrought with issues.  My inkling is he will attend community college if that.  On the other hand he is very practical and has both feet on the ground.  I have no doubt that he will make his way in an unconventional manner.

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I think it's more that the "superstar" posts tend to stand out in our minds, simply because some of these kids and their accomplishments are so amazing.

 

Posts (and the students they are about) really range all over the spectrum. I'd be surprised if a day goes by without someone asking for a "git-'er-done" book, whether they should step in or let their kid fail, and so on.

 

When we're hanging out with local homeschool friends, dd can seem like a bit of an academic superstar. When I'm on this board, definitely not, lol.

There are weeks when a lot of posts make me sigh. So many things that I'd hoped for and planned for my kids' education aren't options because we keep moving. They had to leave behind sports teams and scout troops and places they could have done academic teams. The oldest two have done ok at making the best of it, but sometimes it really frustrates me.

 

But I really don't want folks to not talk about their great athlete or rocket team or musician or debater. I love hearing about all of it. Even if it's not the road my kid is on. Even if it makes me wistful.

 

I think on the whole this is a pretty safe place to talk about highs and lows. For all I know I'm someone who looks put together with high achieving kids. There are only two people in real life who have any idea how my kids' test scores were because when I talk about AP with most homeschoolers I get blank looks.

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I had an average high schooler, an above average high schooler, a superstar, and a middle schooler right now who has qualities which can't be taught in an AP or Honors' class:)  I do think I've bragged about every child I've had.  I think I've exaggerated their strengths, but not their weaknesses.  They've achieved, super achieved, failed, or failed miserably.  Sometimes, they've made horrible, irrevocable choices.  If I'm honest, I did the same thing:)  I seem to have an easier time reading the messages people put up about their children, bragging, excusing their rude behavior, complaining, etc. than I do listening to them in real life.  I mean when obvious endless brags are disguised as a "prayer request," yes, I sometimes roll my eyes, but lately, I feel sympathy.  I realize that 

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Academically average students here, who both went straight from high school to the local community college -- and one now plans to stop college classes ::gasp:: :svengo: :tongue_smilie: , promote to manager and work full time, and buy a house.

I think we see a lot of threads on the extreme ends of the bell curve -- advanced/gifted and delayed/LDs -- because families need help addressing those special needs. Families with average students who are "getting it done", just keep plugging away and don't tend to post because they don't have specific needs or questions. Also, I think we see a lot of super-star student threads because this is a classical education board, and classical education focuses on academic rigor, which matches up well with top tier colleges and scholarships.

Not everyone needs college, or is suited for it. Not every job requires a 4-year degree. I'd love to see our society start encouraging other skills and qualities as valuable -- kindness, service, generosity, diligence, and sacrifice -- and valuing the "unsung" jobs -- skilled trades, teaching, care-givers, home businesses/small businesses, etc. Okay, done with my lecture for the day.

In case it's of interest, here are a few threads about the middle of the bell curve ? -- enjoy! 

Anyone just doing average work in high school?
s/o "average work in high school" -- when did you know that's how it would be
I want to share some very average PSAT scores
High school AS high school
I would like to hear from moms of average kids who want to go to college
Mike Rowe and trades
Links to websites for non-college-bound high schoolers

ETA -- UPDATE, almost 2 years later:
DS in paragraph 1 did stop taking classes at the CC, worked for 1.5 years, did a 9-month commitment with an AmeriCorps partner program doing trail restoration/conservation, which led to doing his first season as a wildland fire fighter this year. Never would have guessed this was the path that was a great fit for him!

ETA -- UPDATE, almost 4 years later:
DS#2 just finished his 2nd season as a wildland firefighter, and is planning on school -- *gasp* -- in the form of a 1-month intensive EMT course in January 2019! Completion of 2 seasons and that EMT course & national certification will open up even more positions to him for next year.

Edited by Lori D.
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Academically average students here, who both went straight from high school to the local community college -- and one now plans to stop college classes ::gasp:: :svengo: :tongue_smilie: , promote to manager and work full time, and buy a house.

 

I think we see a lot of threads on the extreme ends of the bell curve -- advanced/gifted and delayed/LDs -- because families need help addressing those special needs. Families with average students who are "getting it done", just keep plugging away and don't tend to post because they don't have specific needs or questions. Also, I think we see a lot of super-star student threads because this is a classical education board, and classical education focuses on academic rigor, which matches up well with top tier colleges and scholarships.

 

Not everyone needs college, or is suited for it. Not every job requires a 4-year degree. I'd love to see our society start encouraging other skills and qualities as valuable -- kindness, service, generosity, diligence, and sacrifice -- and valuing the "unsung" jobs -- skilled trades, teaching, care-givers, home businesses/small businesses, etc. Okay, done with my lecture for the day.

 

In case it's of interest, here are a few threads about the middle of the bell curve ;) -- enjoy! :)

 

Anyone just doing average work in high school?

s/o "average work in high school" -- when did you know that's how it would be

I want to share some very average PSAT scores

High school AS high school

I would like to hear from moms of average kids who want to go to college

 

This is a great post.

 

My second-eldest will be a senior next year. He's tried out various career ideas, from optometrist to artist, and he definitely has the ability/grades/achievements to go to college and do well. But after considering all the options he's decided to follow in the footsteps of his father, grandfather, two great-grandfathers and two uncles and go into skilled labor. He's planning to knock out the necessary credits left for graduation and apply to the local plumbers and steamfitters apprenticeship the week he turns 18.

 

He is responsible, hardworking, intelligent, diligent, strong, and kind. He belongs on his feet with tools in his hands (it's a family trait) and I'm glad he figured this out before becoming unhappy in a white collar track.

 

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I think I have 2 super-star students, 2 average students, and 2 struggling students.  Each have their own set of issues!  All of my children (and me) need to work on diligence.  Right now I'm trying to figure out how to help my formerly struggling student find the right path now that he's graduated.  I wish I had really helped him before now, but it was such a challenge to get him through the basics, I don't know what else we could have done.

 

Just wanted you to know that you are not alone! 

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Too early for me to tell with my own dc. But I used to teach evening/weekend adult classes in a community college. I remember one student, a solid C student. Never late, always contributed to discussions. When it was his birthday, he asked if his girlfriend could bring a cake for the class. At the end of the year, he organized a class party.

 

Who would I recommend for a job, or hire if I had a business? My C student, hands down. He just contributed so much. In fact, he changed my mind about students and grades in general.

 

HTH

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1) I see lots of posts about average or below average students especially in math

2) I see some replies that don't have much common sense

example: OP says their child is not good in or does not like math then somebody replies with try AoPS because their child uses it !@$!

I tried aops for my son mostly because of descriptions I read here. This was for a kid who in grade 7 could not finish more than 1/4 of a grade 6 math program. Aops geometry and algebra were a perfect fit for him. Some struggling students can use these programs, but of course it isn't going to be a good fit for all. This son has gone on to excel at higher math and we might not have unlocked this potential were it not for the board discussions.

 

For OP: I have been considering starting a thread 'Minimal High School Help' because I am now homeschooling an average or below average teen.

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My children have a range of abilities. I enjoy reading about boardies' superstars because it helps guide and focus the college search for some of my kiddos.

 

As for the struggles some of my dc's have... I am not comfortable publicly sharing too much.

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My kids are across the spectrum.  My ds who is a chemE was a strong student.  My dd with a 2 yr Allied Health degree and works as a COTA was a more avg student.  A 2 yr program was a perfect match for her.  (FWIW, she makes a fabulous income.  Far more than the median US income.)  Younger siblings are following similar patterns......extremely strong, completely avg.  We just work wherever they are.

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Yup 2 of them.  Both plan to graduate, 1 planning to go into a trade after that, the other plan A is military, plan B is a BA 4 year program.  They have average marks, some great some barely a pass. One struggles to get those average marks, more due to mental health issues and laziness than ability, other one is capable of more but just doesn't care and puts in the minimum she can.  Neither will ever be superstars but I hope by the end of grade 12 they are more like upper average than lower average kwim

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There are weeks when a lot of posts make me sigh. So many things that I'd hoped for and planned for my kids' education aren't options because we keep moving. They had to leave behind sports teams and scout troops and places they could have done academic teams. The oldest two have done ok at making the best of it, but sometimes it really frustrates me.

 

But I really don't want folks to not talk about their great athlete or rocket team or musician or debater. I love hearing about all of it. Even if it's not the road my kid is on. Even if it makes me wistful.

 

 

Yes, moving (dh was in the military for 3 years...we lived overseas for awhile) right in the middle of my older daughter's upper years has caused so many issues and problems. Even now, we are still trying to get back our sense of stability and structure. I try not to focus on this because it breaks my heart too much to think about it. Due to the amount of time lost because we did not have a home and/or our belongings, along with my older daughter's struggles in math, we decided to add a year to her high school. We are behind the typical path, but dh and I decided that an extra year...probably two...will not really be the crisis that it's often made out to be. We have family who place a lot of emphasis on what they consider "normal" for a 17/18 year-old. Of course, we get this from older daughter's friends (and their parents), since they are on the typical track. Basically, we get a lot of questions and expressed concerns about this.

 

Also, like Heather in PNW, I tend to keep as much of our struggles off the board as possible. My daughters would be crushed if they read posts with personal struggles information. (My older daughter knows about and has read from this board before.) I try to save them for when I really need help.

 

My older daughter is beginning to move along now. She has been back with her childhood piano teacher (excellent teacher) who knows how to work with, motivate and yet still challenge her. She's still struggling in math...we are super slow, but she can make progress...she just needs more time. Science is affected because of the math, but we do what we can as we can. In every other way she is an amazing student. She's an accomplished student in literature, art history, history and other humanities-related subjects. Her memory is amazing. She is lovely, articulate and full of interesting things to say. She will be taking a CC class in the fall, if we can make this work, but we will only tackle a math class and something light/fun such as photography or drama.

 

She's signed up for an SAT prep class (half a day) next month, but mostly just to expose her to the realities of the test and to gain some test-taking instruction. Mathematically she is not really ready for the SAT. We will wait and take the test in the fall most likely. After her test prep class, I plan to have her work through the SAT blue book, a little at a time each week. She will probably take the SAT and we'll add the ACT if needed. Long-term plan is to take local CC classes for about 2 years and then transfer to a bigger school after that. She's considering a couple of different majors in the fields of humanities and/or the arts.

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My youngest may be superstar (she's only 9, so hard to tell yet), but my 3 older kids are not. 

 

My oldest is headed for an associate in electronics, and does not plan to go beyond that.  He will do some DE his senior year, but he will already be 18yo when he starts, as he was held back 8th!  (He'll mainly be taking electronics courses....kind of like doing technical high school.)  His *superstar* trait is informing others of the rules and facts.

 

His brother has executive function issues that make him underperform, and his grades are pretty average, though we are still considering AP for him (2E).  However, he is wonderfully personable, and excels in computer programming.

 

3rd child is chronically frustrated, possibly mildly dyslexic.  She'll be repeating 8th.    However, she has a tremendous love for animals, and is very good with them!  She hates school, and has no desire to do any kind of extra effort things like honors, AP, DE, etc.  She was more than willing to repeat a grade if it meant any less effort in schoolwork.  She wishes she could skip high school and go directly to vet tech school.

 

I don't think anyone looks at my older kids and says, "Wow."  (Well, maybe the computer programming...)   But...I was a superstar student....it didn't make me any more successful in life. I actually had a hard time adjusting to the real world when they didn't praise my fast and accurate work!  I'm attempting to instill in my kids that academics matter, but there are other things that matter more....things like social skills, common sense, etc. That doesn't mean I wouldn't love to have an academic superstar (and I'm hopeful with my 4th), but I don't want to value that above other giftings, either.   (A military-type....assuming more athletic...would be a gifting, too!  I often wish I had at least one athletically inclined!)

 

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So in the past few months I've had several visits with hard working trades folks. Plumbers, moving crew, fridge repair, AC repair, exterminator etc. I have been so impressed with some of these people who have come into my home, answered my questions, done good work and generally blessed me with their skills, diligence and work ethic.

 

You don't have to have advanced degrees to do honorable work and bless those you encounter. If you are raising the next generation who will replace my water heater before it floods the book room in the basement or will be there fixing my AC on the Fourth of July, I will call you blessed.

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I have what would be considered superstar children and struggling children.  I finally decided to post about a "superstar's" college acceptances because the information I got from other board members sharing was tremendously helpful to me.  Seeing the array of colleges that kids with similar stats and interests applied to helped guide and focus our search. 

 

As for the struggling dc's... I would love to post more and ask/give guidance and support, but am afraid of sharing too much on a public forum.  

 

 

This.  I have some fairly significant challenges right now and I have considered posting for ideas many times.  But, I'd have to go into so much detail about our particular situation.  I don't feel comfortable revealing so much about this student so it is a tricky situation.

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I've posted here quite a bit over the years, even though I never even graduated my middle dd, she didn't do enough work (I will give her a diploma if she ever does a 4th English class, one of my minimum requirements, but she's a busy working single mother at age 27 -- a waitress who supports herself).

 

I've enjoyed chiming in on superstar threads and saying, yes, this is great, but it isn't necessary for everyone.  I hope if you see a need, you will feel free to do the same!

 

I know it can feel like a tightrope at times, because folks who are in serious need of advanced curriculum don't want superstar posters to be chased away, because they desperately need the help.  However, I tend to chime in anyways, because I've known or chatted off-list with some who have pushed their kids into alienation, or who think they had better give up because they are not capable to school their own children.  And when I've chimed in, I've felt folks on this board are pretty respectful (I feel more so than other WTM boards I've tried). 

 

So far, we've coexisted pretty well over here :)

 

Julie

P.S. Of course, we all have a bad day once in a while...

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My middle ds is not all that into academics. If learning something he is interested in, recently photography and always guitar playing, he picks things up quickly and learns easily otherwise he is happy to do as little as possible. I recently took him out of public school to homeschool him again which has made him happier. He has a lot of interests but none that would require a four year college degree. We'll see what he ends up doing.

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to be fair, I like to hear about the high successes as well. As I started to read this board, it gave me a feel for what high school might look like for us. For me, part of the journey has been accepting the person ds has become through high school. He's never wanted a top tier school, he's never wanted to put in more effort on things he's not interested in studying. Part of the acceptance comes in recognizing where my schooling leaves off and his effort takes over, and not wringing my hands over how the initial vision didn't line up with reality. He's still turning into a pretty awesome young man, academically and otherwise. 

 

 

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to be fair, I like to hear about the high successes as well.

 

same here! I like hearing all of the stories.  The ones I don't have a lot in common with and the ones I have more in common with.  :)

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Mine isn't taking AP tests, making perfect scores on the SAT or solving any world problems, but I love hearing about the ones who are.   :001_smile: It keeps me motivated.

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Academically, my sons are "one of each". 

 

But they are both superstars to me...when I put academics aside and look at their hearts. :-) 

 

And then there is our little daughter who will crawl up in my lap and pat me on the cheek and say, "I want to be a momma JUST LIKE YOU when I grow up." Now if that isn't superstar material, I don't know what is! lol!

 

 

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Part of the acceptance comes in recognizing where my schooling leaves off and his effort takes over, and not wringing my hands over how the initial vision didn't line up with reality. He's still turning into a pretty awesome young man, academically and otherwise. 

 

Words of wisdom. Thank you.

 

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My DD is intelligent, we'll have a few APs and dual enrollment under our belts, and a more than respectable GPA when she graduates, but she wants to be a farmer and tells me every day she sees no point in all this Latin because she could be a farmer with just a high school diploma and basic English. DS is the same deal academically, but is the most unenthusiastic kid I have ever me when it comes to academics. My kids seem to have no appreciation for math, great literature, or the typical academic stuff, even though I try to instill a love of learning in them. I think their lack of enthusiasm will pull them down, and I am sad that I hustle so hard to give them something they see no value in. Sigh.

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The sports is a superstar achievement, in my book. Few kids are really good at sports.

 

QUOTE: "tell me about the super star stuff in your son... he is GREAT.. I want to hear your mommy smile moment in him.. "

 

 

He really is a great kid. His strengths seem to be people-skills and athletics. He has a lot of friends and is quite social. He earned his letter jacket in football last week.

 

He is a superstar in scouts. For the last few summers, he's been a camp counselor all summer long. At the end of the summer they always tell me how great he is at his job, and they request him back each summer.

 

Yet he also has a tender heart. He has great compassion and patience with our special-needs son. Of all his brothers, our SN son prefers him. It melts my heart to watch them interact.

 

I know he'll find his niche in life. But still, it's a bit disappointing to know he isn't college-bound, but I suppose that's my own issue. I realize that's my prideful self getting smacked down. (LOL)

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My DD is intelligent, we'll have a few APs and dual enrollment under our belts, and a more than respectable GPA when she graduates, but she wants to be a farmer and tells me every day she sees no point in all this Latin because she could be a farmer with just a high school diploma and basic English. DS is the same deal academically, but is the most unenthusiastic kid I have ever me when it comes to academics. My kids seem to have no appreciation for math, great literature, or the typical academic stuff, even though I try to instill a love of learning in them. I think their lack of enthusiasm will pull them down, and I am sad that I hustle so hard to give them something they see no value in. Sigh.

 

Their appreciation will come later in life, when they realize that you have given them the fundamentals to live in society. Hard work now will pay off in the future.

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The sports is a superstar achievement, in my book. Few kids are really good at sports.

 

 

Thank you for saying this. The pressure for all the kids to be both brilliant and the best at their sport is wearing me down. I keep saying to myself "her ACT score is fine." She is tired. And she is trying hard to keep up.

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My DD is intelligent…  but she wants to be a farmer and tells me every day she sees no point in all this Latin because she could be a farmer with just a high school diploma and basic English...

 

DS is the same deal academically, but is the most unenthusiastic kid I have ever me when it comes to academics...

 

My kids seem to have no appreciation for math, great literature, or the typical academic stuff, even though I try to instill a love of learning in them. I think their lack of enthusiasm will pull them down, and I am sad that I hustle so hard to give them something they see no value in. Sigh.

 

Heigh Ho already said it, but just wanted to add  :grouphug: .

 

Neither of our DSs were "into" school; they are both bright and good thinkers, and I did a tremendous amount of creative, inspired HARD work to keep it interesting while providing solid foundations, and their response (at best) was: ::yawn::. They just didn't care about "school", or have that drive and very high level of love of learning that I do.

 

I just want to encourage you that it does get better in high school when you are able to get into some great discussions (all that work in the earlier years laid the foundation of information, critical thinking to be ABLE to have discussions). And now, as young adults/college ages, DSs have both expressed appreciation for all of that hustle on my part -- now that they see for themselves how so many of the people they encounter daily are unable to think, or have no awareness of anything beyond the nearest cell phone or television…

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I have four kids and they are all so different.  My oldest dd is an unusually intelligent student who loves academics.  My ds is very average.  He could care less about most of it, haha.  DD pushes herself, I have to push DS.  It is okay.  They are all different.  Not everyone is made to be academic.  There are some amazingly gifted people who aren't into academics.  Breathe :)

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Starting next year, I will have an average high school student and a very advanced high school student. Due to many other factors (including work ethic), I do not extrapolate that to any future success later in life. Being gifted is great. Being diligent is even better. The tortoise and the hare and all...

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Being gifted is great.  Being diligent is even better.  The tortoise and the hair and all...

 

Like like like!  If there is anything I want my children to know, it's how to be diligent.

 

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My oldest is talented in art, but her SAT score was mediocre. She got a scholarship, but not on her academics. And the whole time she's been in school she's been lucky to keep a B average. Her second semester she failed *D* a class...and changed her major to avoid having to take it again. She's loved her art college years, but she's looking for a job to pay the bills now she's finished and having a hard time finding anything, despite her 4 years of part-time experience.

 

My ds went to community college at 16 because he wouldn't work for me anymore and I was tired of fighting with him, not because he was smart. He had no direction when he began, non at all. It's been a good thing for him, but a 4-year college would not have been a good place for him to start. It is only now, at 20, that he's ready to contemplate an actual 4-year degree. And today, talking with his aunt, he actually mentioned an MBA. I nearly fell off my chair.

 

My graduating high school senior's answer when people ask her what next is, "Don't expect me to go to college." This summer's part-time lifeguarding is as far ahead as she's willing to look.

 

I have 4-year hopes for my youngest, but that can certainly change over the high school years. Hey, we're normal.

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Like like like! If there is anything I want my children to know, it's how to be diligent.

 

Fixed the misspelling of hare. (Painful!)
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My DD is intelligent, we'll have a few APs and dual enrollment under our belts, and a more than respectable GPA when she graduates, but she wants to be a farmer and tells me every day she sees no point in all this Latin because she could be a farmer with just a high school diploma and basic English. DS is the same deal academically, but is the most unenthusiastic kid I have ever me when it comes to academics. My kids seem to have no appreciation for math, great literature, or the typical academic stuff, even though I try to instill a love of learning in them. I think their lack of enthusiasm will pull them down, and I am sad that I hustle so hard to give them something they see no value in. Sigh.

I know a great farmer who is back in school right now after years of farming (he is in his forties) finishing up an agriculture degree because he realized he needed the extra schooling to really do what he wants to do--which is still farming.

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My DD is intelligent, we'll have a few APs and dual enrollment under our belts, and a more than respectable GPA when she graduates, but she wants to be a farmer and tells me every day she sees no point in all this Latin because she could be a farmer with just a high school diploma and basic English. DS is the same deal academically, but is the most unenthusiastic kid I have ever me when it comes to academics. My kids seem to have no appreciation for math, great literature, or the typical academic stuff, even though I try to instill a love of learning in them. I think their lack of enthusiasm will pull them down, and I am sad that I hustle so hard to give them something they see no value in. Sigh.

Has your dd read any of Eliot Coleman's books, The Market Gardener by Jean-Martin Fortier, or Sustainable Market Farming by Pam Dawling?  I am an enthusiastic reader of gardening and farming books.  What impresses me the most about successful organic farmers is that they are always learning.  Coleman and Fortier are mechanical geniuses, Dawling keeps superb records using software, and all three are extremely organized.  Your dd would do well to study these three farmers' works.  They work hard and smart.

 

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Well, if only I had waited one more day to post my whiney complaint...

 

Yesterday we received word that ds is being considered for the position of "area manager" for Boy Scout camp this coming summer.  That would mean a pay increase, plus supervisory role, plus more responsibility.  He's chompin' at the bit and can't wait until summer now. 

 

 

He's a great kid.  Really.  It's just that academics are. not. his. thing.

 

 

 

(And I just wanted to clarify that I, too, enjoy reading about the accomplishments of everyone's superstar kids.  I hope that I'm not discouraging anyone from posting about them!)

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