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Need help finding a Bible curric for 11th grader


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So we are just now beginning to homeschool, DD 16 is withdrawing next week after her block class finals and starts homeschooling, with some courses at local college and co-op. She has asked for a Bible class. I would like to find something that works through the tenets of Christianity (we are conservative, evangelical Baptists), foundations of theology for Christians, not so much denominational (if that makes sense). Any other suggestions? This would be a .5 credit elective for a semester.  It does need to be something she can do on her own with weekly discussion time with me. (I am a full time teacher and also in grad school, so time is precious!)

Thanks for the help!

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We took a slightly different approach with my junior.  It may not work since you are only looking at a semester but we deicded we would like our son to read through the complete Bible once before graduating.  We found www.doinggood.org.  It has a 365 read through the bible plan which when broken in half was just about perfect for his last  two school years.  The site has questions for each days reading to check for comprehension/review.  You could probably just pick an area of study and have her work on those sections too.

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Like some of the others, I strongly encourage having a teen read through the entire Bible.  Even if they are pretty familiar, it's different at the rhetoric level, when students are beginning to own and analyze info for themselves.  If they aren't all that familiar, then I like the NIrV version, which has simple words and sentences but is the entire Bible, just to avoid getting bogged down and not finishing.  I like having a study Bible on hand for the footnotes, as someone mentioned, and I also like the Greenleaf Guide, which some find dull but for us it just ensured we kept alert, and it didn't distract us in other directions.  Other than that, I just like a brief response journal type of thing or notebooking; another mom I know had the kids write the "most important" person/event/etc. periodically (can't remember if it was each day, each chapter, or each book). The next time through, a more exacting translation or study aid can be added. There are streamlined versions of the Bible which avoid some of the repetition, but in high school I like kids to really see the whole thing -- notice that Kings and Chronicles have a lot of overlap, or that each Gospel author tells the same story from a different perspective.

 

After the Bible, we did church history and then worldviews (using MFW), and that was a good progression for us.

Julie

P.S. My dd came home to school in 10th grade and I think she still really appreciates having done this.

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I don't think you can cover all of that in one semester! I highly recommend Precept Upon Precept studies. She can do the studies with a group, if there is one near you, or she can do them independently, or she can join an online study group. The videos are optional, but I highly recommend them. If time is short, she can choose the "In & Out" version when it is available. Precept Upon Precept homework takes an average of one hour a day, five days a week. 

 

To cover the  material you noted, I suggest the following: 

 

Covenant (11 weeks)

Kinsman Redeemer (3 weeks)

Sermon on the Mount (10 weeks)

Spiritual Gifts (12 weeks)

Romans, Pt. 1, Ch. 1-5 (14 weeks)

Romans, Pt. 2, Ch. 6-8 (9 weeks)

Romans, Pt. 3, Ch. 9-11 (8 weeks)

Romans, Pt. 4, Ch. 12-16 (8 weeks)

 

Most Christian doctrine is covered in the book of Romans. I think that an understanding of the role of Covenant, esp. God's Covenant with believers, is foundational. Kinsman Redeemer is an extension on Covenant. Sermon on the Mount and Spiritual Gifts are practical. If I could only do some of them, I would do Covenant and all of the Romans studies. 

 

Perhaps the biggest benefit from doing these studies is that the students learn inductive Bible study methods that they can use throughout their lives, even when not participating in a formal study. The book How to Study Your Bible by Kay Arthur is an excellent reference tool to use during these studies. 

 

You can find the descriptions of each study on the Precept web site. There is also a "look inside" feature. 

 

ETA: Here is a free download from Precept that explains what inductive study is with some instruction. 

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What aboyt Bible Study Fellowship?  I really look forward to doing this when my dd is in college together someday.  But for now, the teen classes are very in depth, from what I understand.  You can attend the adult and she can attend the teen. I believe they move the kids to the adult classes when they are 17 as long as they are very serious.

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I'm in the just read the Bible camp. The National Survey of Youth and Religion found only 3 factors that correlated positively with a teen staying in church five years past 18 and reading the Bible themselves was one of them. I don't think that would be to much reading for a class and I might consider having her read something like this as a go along: http://www.amazon.com/What-Bible-All-About-Revised-NIV/dp/0830759662/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1420459139&sr=8-1&keywords=what+the+bible+is+all+about(KJV version is also available).

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I have this book and plan to use it with DD: http://www.amazon.com/Systematic-Theology-Introduction-Biblical-Doctrine/dp/0310286700/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1420479318&sr=1-1&keywords=systematic+theology

 

For our Bible studies, I usually ask DD which sections she would like to read thereby engaging her interest.  Then we start to delve into that section until we're done.  We both have the HCSB Student Apologetics Bible which incorporates any twisted scriptures, archeology, and other notes within the text.  We begin by reading the background introduction and then go chapter by chapter.  While reading each chapter, we highlight using the GOAL Journal method provided by Simply Charlotte Mason: https://simplycharlottemason.com/store/goal-bible-study-journal/

and their Discovering Doctrine Journal: https://simplycharlottemason.com/store/discovering-doctrine-personal-bible-study/

 

Other resources which may help and I plan to use:

 

At the same time, we are studying apologetics in the evenings.  I believe this is crucial to get her ready for the anti-Christian/religion bombardment she will face in college.  To accomplish this goal I have several resources.

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I have this book and plan to use it with DD: http://www.amazon.com/Systematic-Theology-Introduction-Biblical-Doctrine/dp/0310286700/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1420479318&sr=1-1&keywords=systematic+theology

 

For our Bible studies, I usually ask DD which sections she would like to read thereby engaging her interest.  Then we start to delve into that section until we're done.  We both have the HCSB Student Apologetics Bible which incorporates any twisted scriptures, archeology, and other notes within the text.  We begin by reading the background introduction and then go chapter by chapter.  While reading each chapter, we highlight using the GOAL Journal method provided by Simply Charlotte Mason: https://simplycharlottemason.com/store/goal-bible-study-journal/

and their Discovering Doctrine Journal: https://simplycharlottemason.com/store/discovering-doctrine-personal-bible-study/

 

Other resources which may help and I plan to use:

 

At the same time, we are studying apologetics in the evenings.  I believe this is crucial to get her ready for the anti-Christian/religion bombardment she will face in college.  To accomplish this goal I have several resources.

 

I'm curious about the Simply Charlotte Mason resources. They look intriguing, but they give such little information that I can't figure it out. The age ranges on the GOAL journal is huge.

 

So can you tell us about:

Instruction provided? Do you need other products or stand alone?

What does the student do?

Point of view? Distinct theology?

If an older student (high school) worked on this what pacing would you suggest?

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Have you looked at any online courses? The Potter's School has several Bible classes for spring semester. We've not done any Bible classes with them, though several of my close friends' children have done many classes with Potters School and have had no doctrinal issues (my friends are conservative Christian of varying denominations). Here is their statement of faith. 

 

There are also some dual enrollment programs through various Christian colleges.  Liberty University, for example, has dual enrollment (and online high school courses but not sure whether you can cherry pick or have to enroll full scale). It looks like Liberty offers some Bible classes online through dual enrollment.  I thought Patrick Henry College offered distance learning, but I don't see it. 

 

Several of my kids have done an apologetics/theology course using:

 

* the apologetics questions/prompts put out by NCFCA 

* a good systematic theology book (Wayne Grudem's is fairly standard and he also has an abridged version titled Bible Doctrine)

* Know What You Believe, by Paul Little (he also wrote Know Why You Believe)

* The Reason for God, Tim Keller

 

Ravi Zacharias has a foundation of apologetics DVD course. 

 

Oooh, while I was looking up a link, I found that there is A.W.Tozer's Attributes of God has been released with a study guide.  That would be an awesome read! That would definitely be worth ordering for a look and might go to the top of my list. I'm glad I searched that b/c I'm putting it on my ds' list of possibilities for next year. :)

 

Lisa

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I'm curious about the Simply Charlotte Mason resources. They look intriguing, but they give such little information that I can't figure it out. The age ranges on the GOAL journal is huge.

 

So can you tell us about:

Instruction provided? Do you need other products or stand alone?

 

No instruction provided because they are both pretty self-explanatory. There instructions via "How To Use" chapters in each book. I downloaded the ebooks so we could do this on Onenote.

 

What does the student do?

 

The Goal Journal is only for certain books of the Bible - the Epistles.  For each Epistle, you have a lite background and then journal pages.  Each Epistle book is broken down into the following sections: Grasp this Promise;  Obey this command; Avoid this Sin; Live this PrincipleWhen DD wants to do other books of the Bible not covered by the Goal Journal, I plan to make similar pages in Word and print them into Onenote so we can continue with this study.

 

As DD and I read the Epistle she's chosen, we highlight any Scripture which we feel meets the qualifications of the individual sections.  Then, when we're finished reading, we write those highlighted Scriptures under the appropriate sections within that Epistle's journal pages.

 

Point of view? Distinct theology?

 

There isn't a particular point of view.  You are copying verses directly from your Bible either word-for-word, or paraphrasing, however you perfer, into the appropriate areas of the journal for each Epistle.  We are copying the verses word-for-word. Once you have completed a particular Epistle, you then have a basic outline of what that Epistle teaches about the promises and commands of God; sins to avoid, and principles to live by.  Going back and reading the journal gives you an overview of what each book of the Bible is about.

 

If an older student (high school) worked on this what pacing would you suggest?

 

Just take it one book at a time and let him/her work at their own pace.  This isn't time sensitive. I'm doing it with DD because I need it and find I'm enjoying it! 

 

Now, the other journal, Discovering Doctrine, is a little different. It deals specifically with Doctrine.  I think this was suggested for high school students, but I know that my DD can handle it since I'm doing both of these with her.  We are doing both journals at the same time.  When we come across doctrine in our Bible readings, we make a notation (highlight) for those also so we can update our Discovering Doctrine Journal at the same time as our Goal Journal. 

 

The sections for Discovering Doctrine are as follows:

  • Bibliology (The Bible)
  • Theology Proper (God)
  • Christology (Jesus Christ)
  • Pneumatology (Holy Spirit)
  • Anthropology (Man)
  • Harmartiology (Sin)
  • Soteriology (Salvation)
  • Angelology (Angels)
  • Ecclesiology (Church)
  • Eschatology (Future Events)

In our readings, whenever we come to a specific teaching (doctrine) regarding one of the above sections, the verse will be copied into the appropriate section just as the Goal Journal.  For example, we read Galatians 3 this afternoon.  The first promise I found to put under the "Grasp this Promise" heading within the Galatians portion of my Goal Journal was Gal., 3:7b - "...then understand that those who have faith are Abraham's sons."   I also found one doctrine (teaching) about angels which I copied into the Angelology section of my Discovering Doctrine Journal, Gal., 3:19C - "...The law was put into effect through angels by means of a mediator." Another doctrine I found I placed in Christology because it is a teaching about Christ, Gal 3:13 - "Christ has redeemed us from the curse of the law by becoming a curse for us, because it is written: Everyone who is hung on a tree is cursed."

 

For us, this is a great study tool.  It can work with any denomination because you're using your own Bible.  It's getting me deeper into the Word, and is teaching us both great study and note-taking habits.

 

HTH

 

 

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Bible Journalling has been something I have recently begun.  It has significantly changed the way I connect with the scripture.  It is not for everyone, but it has really given a new dimension to my personal study.  You can try Googling to get an idea of what many people do.  Mainly it is turning to artistic expression in the large margins of a study or journalling bible.  The idea is to allow yourself to transcend the words into an experience and then act upon the experience in the moment.  Not to get caught up in perfect, but to really express yourself by letting go.  That is much harder than it might initially sound.

 

My second thought would be to read a bit of some of Peter Enns.  He is a controversial biblical writer/scholar, but he has really made me think.  I do not suggest this as a situation where you walk away agreeing with him or changing yourself to fit what he says one should do, but more so because he is a highly educated man with a different perspective than many have received when it comes to faith.  I find his viewpoints ask me to look at the scripture differently, from another angle.  That has been helpful for me to either illuminate how I personally feel or to perhaps step back a moment and think about how to articulate myself differently.  For a teenager who is coming into their own verbalization of faith and their own articulation of their views, it might be greatly beneficial.  Honestly, this is one you would really need to do with your teen.  But, since you are going to be sending her out into the world sooner rather than later, and she is going to be exhibiting independence sooner more than likely too, it might be a wonderful way to begin having her express/defend/articulate herself in a safe place with you instead of in a potentially more hostile environment.  One of my favorite quotes is, "What if God is actually fine with the Bible just as it is?  Not the well-behaved version we create [with reading only specific portions we like], but the messy, troubling, weird, and ancient Bible that we actually have.  Maybe this Bible has something to show us about our own sacred journey of faith...The Bible's raw messiness isn't a problem to be solved.  It's an invitation to a deeper faith."   Things like that make me sit back and think "Hrmm...well...I never thought about it like that"  Then I go back to Deuteronomy and read sections that seem so bizarre to include, but it makes me force myself to find the reasoning, to find why they exist, to think about the messages not just dismiss it as kind of weird (I mean how horribly arrogant is that when I think about it?  I'm telling God he really should have had a better editor?!)

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