Menu
Jump to content

What's with the ads?

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Sue in St Pete

End of semester report

Recommended Posts

I love reading all of these! My oldest DS had a super first semester. His advisor has taken a real interest in him, he's found a meaningful extracurricular club with great people and done some fun things, and worked extremely hard--especially necessary since he's dyslexic. And he earned a 4.0!!! Yay!!! Now on to the spring...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What an exciting semester for our students, eh? I appreciated all of the stories.

 

Our daughters -- one is a college freshman and the other is a high school senior -- enrolled at the local college in late May and took two courses (four credits) over the summer session and four courses (fifteen credits) over the fall semester. They have earned As in all of their courses, and we are happy that they are happy. We are just careful about expecting a 4.0 throughout their college careers. They are both STEM majors, and while they are not taking a "light" load even in these, their early semesters, the coursework can only increase in difficulty. We're not lowering the bar, so to speak; we simply want to be realistic. As it has always been, the goal is to learn, to grow, to think, and -- one hopes -- to master. If an A follows, wonderful. If not? Well, there are sorrows keener than these, as Jane Kenyon reminds us.

 

That said, they did earn the first and second highest grades in each of their classes, swapping the high-score spot on exams throughout both sessions, and both would tell you that having a live-in best friend and study buddy has played a significant role in their college success, to date. Of the four courses (fourteen credits) they will take next semester, they share three and will part company only in math: The freshman will take statistics and the high school senior, calculus.

 

In other threads, some have shared stories about professors not grading assignments in a timely fashion. Whoo, boy, have we some anecdotes about that! I hesitate to share too much, though... Let's just say that more than a dozen times over the recently concluded semester I wondered how the students who *didn't* have their study buddy and former teacher both living under the same roof with them fared.

 

The only real "difficulty" I can report is that it can be *HARD* to be a high school senior who is enrolled in college fulltime. Even (or perhaps, particularly) at the most competitive high schools, seniors have some time built into their conventional school day to meet with counselors to prepare admissions and scholarship submissions. My youngest, a young (sixteen-year-old) high school senior acting every inch a competitive college freshman, did not have that luxury. She did get it all done, though. She was admitted to the three universities to which she applied and offered generous merit scholarships to all. In fact, she will interview on campus next semester for a larger merit scholarship at one of the three.

 

Exciting times here, indeed.

 

Finally, I will share that our daughters refrained from sharing with their professors and peers that they were home-educated, even when the topic was raised in both a writing class and a freshman seminar. But following a post-class conversation, one prof said, "You're homeschooled, right?" When they asked how he knew, he mentioned, among other things, that they weren't afraid of the work and that they were so engaged in their studies -- which were interesting observations when considered beside the utter shock another prof expressed when she learned that they had been homeschooled. She came just short of saying it was impossible to believe that homeschooled students could do so well in college course. Heh, heh, heh. Both profs wrote the youngest letters of recommendation, by the way. *smile*

 

Wishing your students an exciting spring semester!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

MMV! It's wonderful to see you here. I've been catching up on your blog; your daughters are such beautiful young ladies. I'm not surprised at all at how well they've done.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pshew!  I finally made it to the end of 3 pages!.  What a wonderful way to see how our kiddos are doing.  So many of you have been on this board a long time like myself and I feel like I sort of know you and your kids :)  I have been in and out of the boards due to family issues and work and just saw this thread today.  I already posted a bit about my soon to graduate son and grad school in another thread.  But...I'll add the other boys in here:

 

DS2 - 4.0.  I'm really not sure how you can get overall scores of 115% in grad level statistics, 105% in another senior engineering level class, and A's in everything, but he has done it.  And he says it's easy. All the while he has been in leadership roles on the race team which takes a huge amount of time. This is why he's headed to grad school.  His top five picks are Stanford, CalTech, UTexas at Austin, MIT, and Georgia Tech.  He already has one acceptance :)  I'm sitting back just cheering him on.

 

DS3 - 3.25 this semester.  This young man has amazed me.  He took a year off to attend Bible College in England and he grew up.  He also gained great self-confidence.  This is his first semester at the state school and he did so well in chemistry that they offered him a tutoring job.  Calculus was easy (huge surprise).  Physics was the bugaboo.  The class average was never much above a 40%.  He was always above the average, but ended up with a C.  He was borderline.  The professor is no longer teaching.  This is fantastic for this particular son who has struggled over the years with a LD.

 

DS4 - 3.75 this semester.  This fella is so strong, so stinkin' smart, but still can't "find" himself. He suffers from the desire to be everyone's friend.  He also thinks he's smarter than anyone else, so that B in Microeconomics was a good humbling lesson.  He is learning more social lessons than anything else right now it seems.  He did great in calculus, public speaking, and all his other classes.  He started his freshman year with 48 concurrent credit hours from our local 4 year college so the academics aren't new to him.  

 

Thank you all for giving us a glimpse into your kids' lives.  I hope those with younger kids will be encouraged by all of this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thought I'd update on my son who failed a required math class during his first semester of college. He retook the class in a 2-week condensed winter session and ended up with a B. It's a miracle! That means he can continue on with current schedule. He's starting week 2 of spring semester tomorrow. I'm hoping he learned something from last semester's difficulties and can apply the lessons to the coming semester.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...