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Book a Week in 2014 - BW47


Robin M
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Tsk, tsk, shukriyya, I've totally enjoyed the le Carré movies I've seen (The Constant Gardener, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, and A Most Wanted Man).

 

It has been so many years since I read Birth of Venus. I remember liking it well enough -- a 'like' not 'love', 3 star book, imo. I originally read it because my fil read & really enjoyed it; he recommended it to me because he thought I would really like it too. I've also read Dunant's book In the Company of the Courtesan & liked that one better, I think, though I didn't especially care for the final pages of In the Company....

 

And, now for some sleepy-time dreams for you... :lol: (These were both great. I have no idea how you can fall asleep during them! I also find it fascinating how le Carré has spanned the globe & intelligence/spy politics during his career -- & how very well he has captured a lot of the spy/intelligence/political maneuvering in a variety of places at different times in modern history....)

 

 

:smilielol5: :lol:

 

TTSS is THE one! Gets me snoozing every time...

 

sleeping-kitten-smiley-emoticon.jpg

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Hello, BaWers!

 

It's been two or three weeks since my last post. I'm still studying flute, working through the Shakespeare MOOC, and volunteering in the literacy program. I also continue in my role as guidance counselor for my youngest, and let me just say that it is no easy task to get all of those apps and essays done when you're taking a full (fifteen credits this semester) college course load. (She's a high school senior enrolled fulltime in the local college's dual enrollment program.) I realize that sounds like a humble-brag. It's not. I wish, oh, how I wish we had realized how tricky this would be. Nearly done, though. Nearly done.

 

Since that last post, I've added the following to my list:

 

â–  Dear Committee Members (Julie Schumacher; 2014. 192 pages. Fiction.)
â–  Lazarus Volume 2 (Greg Rucka; 2014. 104 pages. Graphic fiction.)
â–  Lazarus Volume 1 (Greg Rucka; 2013. 96 pages. Graphic fiction.)
■ The Adversary: A True Story of Monstrous Deception (Emmanuel Carrère; 2002. 191 pages. Non-fiction.)
â–  Pericles (William Shakespeare (1606?); Folger ed. 2005. 304 pages. Drama.) *
â–  So Much Pretty (Cara Hoffman; 2011. 320 pages. Fiction.)
â–  Revival Volume 4: Escape to Wisconsin (Tim Seeley; 2014. 128 pages. Graphic fiction.)
â–  The Walking Dead Volume 22: A New Beginning (Robert Kirkman; 2014. 135 pages. Graphic fiction.)
â–  The Walking Dead Volume 21: All Out War Part 2 (Robert Kirkman; 2014. 135 pages. Graphic fiction.)

 

That puts me 89 for the year, so it's uncertain whether I will meet my two-a-week goal since I am now five behind. We'll see. We have a five-day Thanksgiving break and our winter break begins on December 12.

 

Tonight I am savoring a book of poetry: 3 Sections by Vijay Seshadri.

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Bit of a rant. I have a copy of Festive in Death from the Library. I am the second person to have this book, the first person managed to get it wet (tub damage I think). Why would someone read a brand new book that does not belong to them in the bathtub? I just requested it in overdrive. So disappointed but at least I can now be picky. Love overdrive......

 

Finished Aunt Dimity Digs In late last night. Enjoyable...... spoiler for Jane......

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

the archaeologist knew all along, test for the students. :lol:

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Thanks for the morning giggle, Mumto2!

 

I finished the Robert Goddard chunkster, Past Caring, recommended by Kareni (or was that her husband?) While I enjoyed it, I think the book could have been clipped by a hundred pages or so.  Or maybe that was just my reaction to the storyline in which a number of manipulative characters (past and present) pull the strings in a vicious cycle.

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I gave a little poetry reading last night and the friend I was reading with shared the name of a series that I think some BaWers might enjoy. I'm thinking of Mumto2 specifically and perhaps Jane. In fact it seems so spot on for you, Mumto2, that I imagine you've read it already but I'll throw it out there anyway, The Mary Russell series by Laurie King. Perhaps it's been mentioned here already?

 

What would happen if Sherlock Holmes, a perfect man of the Victorian age--pompous, smug, and misogynistic--were to come face to face with a twentieth-century female? If she grew to be a partner worthy of his great talents?

 

1914, a young woman named Mary Russell meets a retired beekeeper on the Sussex Downs. His name is Sherlock Holmes. And although he may have all the Victorian "flaws" listed above, the Great Detective is no fool, and can spot a fellow intellect even in a fifteen-year-old woman.

 

So, at first informally, then consciously, he takes Mary Russell as his apprentice. They work on a few small local cases, then on a larger and more urgent investigation, which ends successfully. All the time, Mary is developing as a detective in her own right, with the benefit of the knowledge and experience of her mentor and, increasingly, friend.

 

And then the sky opens on them, and they find themselves the targets of a slippery, murderous, and apparently all-knowing adversary. Together they devise a plan to trap their enemy--a plan that may save their lives but may also kill off their relationship.

 

This is not a "Sherlock Holmes" story. It is the story of a modern young woman who comes to know and work with Holmes, the story of young woman coming to terms with herself and with this older man who embodies the age that is past.

 

When I'm done my 5/5 I'll be dipping into this series for sure. It looks like fun and well written, too.

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I gave a little poetry reading last night and the friend I was reading with shared the name of a series that I think some BaWers might enjoy. I'm thinking of Mumto2 specifically and perhaps Jane. In fact it seems so spot on for you, Mumto2, that I imagine you've read it already but I'll throw it out there anyway, The Mary Russell series by Laurie King. Perhaps it's been mentioned here already?

 

 

It's a good, enjoyable series and gets better as it goes along, though as with most series it gets uneven as it goes further along.  Laurie R King also has a police detective series set in San Francisco that features a female detective, with one title being a Sherlock Holmes related mystery. Can't think of the title.  It reminds me that I enjoy the author, liked the one SF based book I read -- bingo!  I have another mystery series I need to obsessively read through!  

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I gave a little poetry reading last night and the friend I was reading with shared the name of a series that I think some BaWers might enjoy. I'm thinking of Mumto2 specifically and perhaps Jane. In fact it seems so spot on for you, Mumto2, that I imagine you've read it already but I'll throw it out there anyway, The Mary Russell series by Laurie King. Perhaps it's been mentioned here already?

 

What would happen if Sherlock Holmes, a perfect man of the Victorian age--pompous, smug, and misogynistic--were to come face to face with a twentieth-century female? If she grew to be a partner worthy of his great talents?

 

1914, a young woman named Mary Russell meets a retired beekeeper on the Sussex Downs. His name is Sherlock Holmes. And although he may have all the Victorian "flaws" listed above, the Great Detective is no fool, and can spot a fellow intellect even in a fifteen-year-old woman.

 

So, at first informally, then consciously, he takes Mary Russell as his apprentice. They work on a few small local cases, then on a larger and more urgent investigation, which ends successfully. All the time, Mary is developing as a detective in her own right, with the benefit of the knowledge and experience of her mentor and, increasingly, friend.

 

And then the sky opens on them, and they find themselves the targets of a slippery, murderous, and apparently all-knowing adversary. Together they devise a plan to trap their enemy--a plan that may save their lives but may also kill off their relationship.

 

This is not a "Sherlock Holmes" story. It is the story of a modern young woman who comes to know and work with Holmes, the story of young woman coming to terms with herself and with this older man who embodies the age that is past.

 

When I'm done my 5/5 I'll be dipping into this series for sure. It looks like fun and well written, too.

I have read the first five or so in the Mary Russell series and really enjoyed them. It another one that I need to get back to. I haven't read the San Francisco based one but have read a stand alone, A Darker Placehttp://www.publishersweekly.com/978-0-553-10711-1#path/978-0-553-10711-1, which I really liked.

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L'Engle is one of my favorite authors. I liked the Austins better than the Murrays. Her adult books are great (A Severed Wasp is one of my favorites) A Ring of Endless Light has long been my favorite YA novel, I don't know how many times I've read it. She is amazing at linking the humanities and the sciences (including math) and faith (she was a devout Christian who often comes across as a universalist). I don't always agree but she always makes me think. I, personally, think her Crosswick Journals are some of the best memoirs out there.

 

I havent made it very far in the Ivy Tree. I read all of Rhonda Woodward's regencies on kindle. They were really good, even though all of the heroes start as rakes. Start with The Wagered Heart. Kisses only.

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Per shukriyya's mention.... I read The Beekeeper's Apprentice (the first of the Mary Russell series by Laurie R. King) years & years ago & really enjoyed it. I've always meant to read some more of the books, but since I'm not much of a 'series' reader, it seems like I never get around to it.

 

And, seeing the incredible lake effect snow in Buffalo & reading some of the stories of people helping each other made me think of a quote from A Dream in Polar Fog:

"People who live in cold climes must keep warm by kindness," Orvo spoke softly in reply.

 

Also, I'm looking forward to the reviews on Kristin Lavransdatter. I've heard many recommendations for it over the past couple of years & keep thinking I may want to read it. But, otoh, I keep avoiding starting such a long book.

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Some fun items.  After all, winter holidays are coming.

 

Steampunk LEGO by Guy Himber

 

"Filled with dirigibles and floating cities, penny-farthings and pirate ships, curiosities and robots galore, Steampunk LEGO is an illustrated collection of Victorian-era sci-fi treasures, all built from LEGO.

 

Curated by award-winning LEGO builder and special effects master Guy Himber, this full-color coffee table book showcases an eclectic variety of models designed by dozens of the world's best LEGO artists.

 

Grab your brass goggles and join fictional explorer Sir Herbert Jobson as he travels the world cataloguing its technological wonders for Queen Victoria. His entertaining descriptions of an imaginative alternate history bring these delightful LEGO models to swashbuckling life."

 

 

and some fun t-shirts from the Signals catalog:

 

 

for the Doctor Who fan:

Knock Knock Who's There Doctor Who Shirt

 

for the lover of English:

 

Tense Shirts

 

Commas Save Lives Shirts

 

 

Regards,

Kareni

 

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Some fun items.  After all, winter holidays are coming.

 

Steampunk LEGO by Guy Himber

 

 

What a neat book!

 

It made me think of a book we bought years ago (in Dutch) -- a history of the world done with Playmobil. The link shows the French version of the book. So much fun, esp. because my dd was always a huge fan of both history & Playmobil. (Some of the inside pages.)

 

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Tsk, tsk, shukriyya, I've totally enjoyed the le Carré movies I've seen (The Constant Gardener, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, and A Most Wanted Man).

 

And, now for some sleepy-time dreams for you... :lol: (These were both great. I have no idea how you can fall asleep during them! I also find it fascinating how le Carré has spanned the globe & intelligence/spy politics during his career -- & how very well he has captured a lot of the spy/intelligence/political maneuvering in a variety of places at different times in modern history....)

 

 

Sleepiness makes sense, I think. It's rather like a chess game but with most of the pieces unmarked. You spend most of the time squinting at them as they move across the board trying to figure out what each is. 

 

It makes me hyper-alert, but then I wonder why I bothered afterward. 

 

I gave a little poetry reading last night and the friend I was reading with shared the name of a series that I think some BaWers might enjoy. I'm thinking of Mumto2 specifically and perhaps Jane. In fact it seems so spot on for you, Mumto2, that I imagine you've read it already but I'll throw it out there anyway, The Mary Russell series by Laurie King. Perhaps it's been mentioned here already?

 

What would happen if Sherlock Holmes, a perfect man of the Victorian age--pompous, smug, and misogynistic--were to come face to face with a twentieth-century female? If she grew to be a partner worthy of his great talents?

 

1914, a young woman named Mary Russell meets a retired beekeeper on the Sussex Downs. His name is Sherlock Holmes. And although he may have all the Victorian "flaws" listed above, the Great Detective is no fool, and can spot a fellow intellect even in a fifteen-year-old woman.

 

So, at first informally, then consciously, he takes Mary Russell as his apprentice. They work on a few small local cases, then on a larger and more urgent investigation, which ends successfully. All the time, Mary is developing as a detective in her own right, with the benefit of the knowledge and experience of her mentor and, increasingly, friend.

 

And then the sky opens on them, and they find themselves the targets of a slippery, murderous, and apparently all-knowing adversary. Together they devise a plan to trap their enemy--a plan that may save their lives but may also kill off their relationship.

 

This is not a "Sherlock Holmes" story. It is the story of a modern young woman who comes to know and work with Holmes, the story of young woman coming to terms with herself and with this older man who embodies the age that is past.

 

When I'm done my 5/5 I'll be dipping into this series for sure. It looks like fun and well written, too.

 

That was a fun book. I read it 2 years ago. It helps if you don't expect Sherlock to be very Sherlock. He's an older, much more mellow and un-Sherlocky version of himself. The books are really about Mary Russell and not Sherlock Holmes. 

 

 

Kristin Lavransdatter: I haven't convinced myself to finish that one, although it may have more to do with obvious foreshadowing and plot drama than anything else. 

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I gave a little poetry reading last night and the friend I was reading with shared the name of a series that I think some BaWers might enjoy. I'm thinking of Mumto2 specifically and perhaps Jane. In fact it seems so spot on for you, Mumto2, that I imagine you've read it already but I'll throw it out there anyway, The Mary Russell series by Laurie King. Perhaps it's been mentioned here already?

 

 

I read the first five or six in the series and then moved on. They were enjoyable when my son was young and I needed a good escape. But I am not sure why my interest was not sustained.

 

How did the poetry reading go? 

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Still reading, but now that we only have one working computer, I'm not online much.

 

Here's a few I've read since I last logged in:

 

37. "The Journal of Best Practices: A Memoir of Marriage, Asperger Syndrome, and One Man's Quest to Be a Better Husband" by David Finch. The book is Finch's account of discovering, as an adult, that he had Asperger's, and the social skills kind of things he learned to do once he knew, in order to save his marriage. This was unofficially recommended to me by the neuropysch who tested my daughter. Unofficially, because the author is a bit of a potty mouth. My daughter was diagnosed with ASD level 1 (what was PDD-NOS in the DSM-IV), and the book came up in the discussion the neuropysch and I were having about it being genetic. So, the book was very thought provoking. Not going to say too much more about that, except to say that I'd already asked my therapist how I'd know if I have ASD, so he screened me, and I do not.

 

36. "Wolf Stalker" by Gloria Skurzynski and Alane Ferguson. Spotted this on the shelves of both the Zion National Park gift shop and our local Boy Scout Office, so decided to preview the series for my kids. I liked it. Reminded me of series like Trixie Belden, etc.

 

35. "Bryce Canyon and Zion National Parks: Danger in the Narrows" by Mike Graf. Previewing for my kids after seeing it on the shelves of the gift shop at Zion. It was okay, with lots of photos, but it reads like a travelogue, more than an adventure story.

 

34. "Unexpected Mrs. Pollifax" by Dorothy Gilman. A re-read, but since the author died, it will have to do.

 

33. "Smart but Scattered" by Peg Dawson and Richard Guare.

32. "Her Next Chapter" by Lori Day.

31. "Sense and Sensibility" by Jane Austen.

30. "The Survival Guide for Kids with ADHD" by John F. Taylor.

29. "The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Families" by Stephen R. Covey

28. "He Delivered Even Me, He Will Deliver Even You" by Misti Stevenson (LDS).

27. "Teachings of Presidents of the Church: Joseph Fielding Smith" (LDS).

26. "Pearl of Great Price" (LDS).

25. "The Verbally Abusive Relationship" by Patricia Evans.

24. "Doctrine & Covenents" (LDS).

23. "The 7-day Christian: How Living Your Beliefs Every Day Can Change the World" by Brad Wilcox (LDS).

22. "Gift of Love" by Kris Mackay (LDS).

21. "In Loving Hands" by Kris Mackay (LDS).

20. "The Outstretched Arms" by Kris Mackay (LDS).

19. "No Greater Love" by Kris Mackay (LDS).

18. "The Book of Mormon" (LDS).

17. "Inferno" by Dan Brown.

16. "The Dead in Their Vaulted Arches" by Alan Bradley.

15. "I Am Not Sick I Don't Need Help!" by Xavier Amador, Ph.D.

14. "How to Teach Your Children Shakespeare" by Ken Ludwig.

13. "Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban.

12. "Code Name Verity" by Elizabeth Wein.

11. "Ender's Game" by Orson Scott Card.

10. "With Healing in His Wings" ed. by Camille Fronk Olson & Thomas A. Wayment (LDS).

9. "Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets" by J.K. Rowling.

8. "The Good Knight" by Sarah Woodbury.

7. "Speaking From Among the Bones" by Alan Bradley.

6. "The Continuous Conversion" by Brad Wilcox (LDS).

5. "The Continuous Atonement" by Brad Wilcox (LDS).

4. "Finding Hope" by S. Michael Wilcox (LDS).

3. "When Your Prayers Seem Unanswered" by S. Michael Wilcox (LDS).

2. "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone" by J.K. Rowling. (Read-aloud)

1. "The Peacegiver: How Christ Offers to Heal Our Hearts and Homes" by James L. Ferrell (LDS).

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OK, while we're on the subject, I have to add the Lego Bible to the roster being pitched, because my friend published it and it's very fun...   :o)

 

Wow. I remember seeing this, but had forgotten about it. I just went to his website & there are a few more very cool books there. I think you just made me spend quite a bit of $ on Lego books, Pam! Dd is taking AP US History this year -- & not liking it very much -- but I know she would love the Revolution! and Assassination! books too. Ds was looking at the website with me & totally loved seeing the photos from inside the books, pointing out which Lego pieces the different scenes were using. So, now I'm buying the Lego Bible set, Revolution!, & Assassination! :lol:

 

https://squareup.com/market/thebrickbible

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Has anyone mentioned The Care and Management of Lies by Jacqueline Winspear (but not a part of the Maisie Dobbs series)?

 

Despite having a full library bag at home, despite the towering bedside stacks (made taller today by a gift from Stacia--thanks!), I just had to take a peak at the New Book shelves at the library while returning a few books.  The Winspear title, a novel set on the homefront during WWI, looked like something I might enjoy.  The review from the Washington Post can be found here.

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I read the first five or six in the series and then moved on. They were enjoyable when my son was young and I needed a good escape. But I am not sure why my interest was not sustained.

 

How did the poetry reading go? 

 

It appears based on everyone's responses to the Mary Russell series that I'm bit late to the party :hat:

 

The poetry reading was sweet, thanks for asking.

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Has anyone mentioned The Care and Management of Lies by Jacqueline Winspear (but not a part of the Maisie Dobbs series)?

 

Despite having a full library bag at home, despite the towering bedside stacks (made taller today by a gift from Stacia--thanks!), I just had to take a peak at the New Book shelves at the library while returning a few books. The Winspear title, a novel set on the homefront during WWI, looked like something I might enjoy. The review from the Washington Post can be found here.

I have been planning to read it but haven't checked it out because I have the next (for me) Maisie Dobbs in my pile. Really like the atmosphere the author creates in her series so this stand alone should be good.

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I just finished Elizabeth Gilbert's The Signature of All Things: A Novel.

 

 

Kareni, I'll be curious to hear how you like this.

 

 

I'm looking forward to your review on this one too, Kareni.

 

It was, in my opinion, an excellent read.  It was also a quick read in the sense that the pages kept turning, and I didn't have to do the math of

 

number of pages in the book

---------------------------------

days to the book group

 

is equal to how many pages I have to read today.

 

The author has clearly researched many topics -- botany, history of sea voyages, history of the 1800s, and Dutch to name just a few -- but it didn't feel as though I was being lectured at all.  All of the research was smoothly incorporated into the writing.  I recommend it.  That said, I do think that more conservative readers will find aspects of the book problematic.  I'm looking forward to tomorrow evening's discussion of the book.

 

Regards,

Kareni

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Finished:

 

The Secret School by Avi - The story of a 14 year old girl who teaches the one room school house when the other teacher has to go home and tend to her sick mother.  I read it with DD and she loved it.  If I read it at 10 I probably would have loved it also.  

 

Forgotten Elegance: The Art, Artifacts, and Peculiar History of Victorian and Edwardian Entertaining in America by Wesley Schollander - This book also had lots of information on entertaining during those time periods in England also.  I enjoyed this book but I would hesitate to recommend it to people unless they are really interested in that time period AND entertaining.  It's pretty detailed.  There is a chapter just on the different type of forks used.  

 

Based on recommendations for a few weeks ago I'm in the middle of the second Flavia deLuce book (audiobook).  

 

I'm also branching out and trying a Georgette Heyer mystery.  I'm only a few chapters in so I'm undecided if I like it or not.  

 

Fans of historical romances might enjoy this free Kindle book by a favorite author of mine:

 

The Duchess War (The Brothers Sinister Book Book 1) by Courtney Milan

 

"Miss Minerva Lane is a quiet, bespectacled wallflower, and she wants to keep it that way. After all, the last time she was the center of attention, it ended badly--so badly that she changed her name to escape her scandalous past. Wallflowers may not be the prettiest of blooms, but at least they don't get trampled. So when a handsome duke comes to town, the last thing she wants is his attention.

But that is precisely what she gets.

Because Robert Blaisdell, the Duke of Clermont, is not fooled. When Minnie figures out what he's up to, he realizes there is more to her than her spectacles and her quiet ways. And he's determined to lay her every secret bare before she can discover his. But this time, one shy miss may prove to be more than his match...'"

 

Regards,

Kareni

 

I just downloaded it ... I was going to ask the same question as Angel and Dawn also.  It doesn't sound like it will shock my Victorian sensibilities!  

 

Bonus!  The audiobook is only $1.99 if you get the book for free from amazon.  How cool!

 

Thank you. 

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Wandered into the library book sale. Remember when I said a few months back that I wasn't going to buy any more books until I read the ones on my shelf? Yeah. In my defense I held out a long time not allowing myself to look in the book sale room. 

 

I got Rediscover Catholicism for my mil

 

 Mr. Darcy's Diary

 

Habits of the House this one caught my eye because on the front it says, "Please read the great Fay Weldon. Downton Abby for smart, literate readers!"

 

I figured, "Well, that's me so I'll give it a go."  :lol:

 

In the mean time I started another non-fiction (hangs head for fear of scolding) about the science behind dog behavior. Still waiting for the book that will explain cat behavior. 

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8 Book Historians, Curators, Specialists, And Librarians Who Are Killing It Online

 

Mom-ninja, there's a lot to love about your post...

 

Habits of the House this one caught my eye because on the front it says, "Please read the great Fay Weldon. Downton Abby for smart, literate readers!"

 

I figured, "Well, that's me so I'll give it a go."  :lol:

 

:laugh: :hurray:

 

In the mean time I started another non-fiction (hangs head for fear of scolding) about the science behind dog behavior.

 

Seriously? What is up with you? :toetap05: 4fvgdaq_th.gif

 

;)

 

Still waiting for the book that will explain cat behavior. 

 

Um, that book doesn't exist. Not sure it ever will....

 

Well, maybe... http://theoatmeal.com/comics/cat_kill
 

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Buzzfeed drives me nuts as do lists in general of the 62 Things that You Must Do Because I Say So and I am a Self Appointed Authority!!!  Nonetheless I clicked on the link and was led to a delightful blog, Ask the Past which is truly one of the more useful ;) things on the Internet.  Consider the following:

 

How to Keep your Cat , c.1470:

 

 

"If you have a good cat and you don't want to lose it, you must rub its nose and four legs with butter for three days, and it will never leave the house."

 

The Distaff Gospels

 

How to Prevent Pregnancy, c. 1260:

 

A weasel placed on a scorpion bite helps greatly... if its heel is taken from it while it still lives and is placed on a woman, she will not get pregnant as long as it is there." 

Albertus Magnus, De animalibus

And this bit of advice from 1558 remains spot on:

 

 

Those who are constantly talking about their children, their wives or their nursemaids, are equally at fault. 'Yesterday my boy made me laugh so much. Listen to this...You have never seen a more lovable son than my Momo...' No-one has so little to do that he has the time to answer or even to listen to such nonsense and so it irritates everyone." 

Giovanni della Casa, Galateo (1558)

 

 

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Buzzfeed drives me nuts as do lists in general of the 62 Things that You Must Do Because I Say So and I am a Self Appointed Authority!!! 

 

angry-old-man-smiley-emoticon.gif

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

:lol:

 

(Um, I don't take any of those lists that way. I look at them more for ways of finding potentially interesting things, take what I like & ignore the rest.)

 

And, since I live to irritate you ;)  (& I know that you love Flavorwire as much as you apparently love Buzzfeed), here's an interesting, scary list from Flavorwire:

8 Books That Illuminate the Crisis in Mexico

 

The list ties in with the quite good (but also quite depressing) movie I saw earlier this year, Kill the Messenger.

 

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Quick update before I need to run. Finished Galore last night. I feel like it loses a little bit of its steam in the second half of the book. Still, it is a glorious, wonderful read, a mix of generational family tales, folklore, & history. Loved the way he also showcased the cyclical nature of life & of the generations of the families.

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Quick update before I need to run. Finished Galore last night. I feel like it loses a little bit of its steam in the second half of the book. Still, it is a glorious, wonderful read, a mix of generational family tales, folklore, & history. Loved the way he also showcased the cyclical nature of life & of the generations of the families.

 

Thanks -- I got it on my Kindle the other day when you and Negin (?right?) spoke about it.  It is next up, after Bel-Ami, which I got yesterday...

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A question - When do you do your reading? You all seem to be reading so much. I am jealous. I want more escape time. Or maybe you just read faster than I? I read pretty slowly and I am totally not interested in changing that because books are too short as it is grin. Anyway, I'm just curious how other people manage...

 

Nan

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A question - When do you do your reading? You all seem to be reading so much. I am jealous. I want more escape time. Or maybe you just read faster than I? I read pretty slowly and I am totally not interested in changing that because books are too short as it is grin. Anyway, I'm just curious how other people manage...

 

Nan

 

I used to do a lot more reading but with a one year old at home I just get to read in bed for awhile every night and then on the rare rare occasion when the baby is asleep, DD is working independently, and the house is cleaned then I'll sit down with a book for awhile in the afternoon.  

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Buzzfeed drives me nuts as do lists in general of the 62 Things that You Must Do Because I Say So and I am a Self Appointed Authority!!!  Nonetheless I clicked on the link and was led to a delightful blog, Ask the Past which is truly one of the more useful ;) things on the Internet.  Consider the following:

 

How to Keep your Cat , c.1470:

 

"If you have a good cat and you don't want to lose it, you must rub its nose and four legs with butter for three days, and it will never leave the house."

 

The Distaff Gospels

 

 

I actually remember my mother suggesting this when we moved to a new house. And we dutifully did it. It worked ;) Meow...

 

 

A question - When do you do your reading? You all seem to be reading so much. I am jealous. I want more escape time. Or maybe you just read faster than I? I read pretty slowly and I am totally not interested in changing that because books are too short as it is grin. Anyway, I'm just curious how other people manage...

 

Nan

 

Nan, I think you'll see the gamut here. Some of us are able to read a prodigious amount and then there are the turtles like me. I seem to manage one book a week. I sense that the 5/5 challenge has influenced my slowness a bit. I find I'm chomping at the bit wanting to read other books I see referenced here. But staying the course is a good meditation in itself for this rambling off on rabbit-trails reader. I love the eclectic range of interests here. I've learned a lot from these wise, engaged women :D

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I actually remember my mother suggesting this when we moved to a new house. And we dutifully did it. It worked ;) Meow...

 

 

 

Nan, I think you'll see the gamut here. Some of us are able to read a prodigious amount and then there are the turtles like me. I seem to manage one book a week. I sense that the 5/5 challenge has influenced my slowness a bit. I find I'm chomping at the bit wanting to read other books I see referenced here. But staying the course is a good meditation in itself for this rambling off on rabbit-trails reader. I love the eclectic range of interests here. I've learned a lot from these wise, engaged women :D

 

I also tend to read shorter books so that helps me get more read in a year.  There are other that might not have as many books but have a lot more pages.  The books I read average between 270-400 pages tops.  I only read a chunkster once a year or so.  

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A question - When do you do your reading? You all seem to be reading so much. I am jealous. I want more escape time. Or maybe you just read faster than I? I read pretty slowly and I am totally not interested in changing that because books are too short as it is grin. Anyway, I'm just curious how other people manage...

 

Nan

 

People read at different speeds and have different lives. I can go for weeks and weeks without finishing anything (or maybe even reading much of anything at all) and then BAM! 3 get done in one week. It helps to have no expectations, although this group has pushed me to finish more than I would otherwise. It inspires me. My first year in this thread I think I read 12 or 13, and I'm proud of that number. It was just that kind of year. Some years are 100 and some years are 10. 

 

Places to read:

 

before going to bed

after waking up

in the bathroom

while cooking

while watching television

in the car

in a waiting room

while waiting for dc to finish schoolwork, chores, or anything (this is a big one for me)

while sitting in the quiet with a cup of tea or hot chocolate before anyone gets up...or after everyone goes to bed

 

My numbers are up this year because I'm reading a variety of things and some of them are quite short. Graphic novels. YA. Read Alouds. Poetry. Art books. Novellas. Cookbooks. Fluff. All much shorter. It's definitely not War and Peace every time (or even most of the time). 

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People read at different speeds and have different lives. I can go for weeks and weeks without finishing anything (or maybe even reading much of anything at all) and then BAM! 3 get done in one week. It helps to have no expectations, although this group has pushed me to finish more than I would otherwise. It inspires me. My first year in this thread I think I read 12 or 13, and I'm proud of that number. It was just that kind of year. Some years are 100 and some years are 10. 

 

Places to read:

 

before going to bed

after waking up

in the bathroom

while cooking

while watching television

in the car

in a waiting room

while waiting for dc to finish schoolwork, chores, or anything (this is a big one for me)

while sitting in the quiet with a cup of tea or hot chocolate before anyone gets up...or after everyone goes to bed

 

My numbers are up this year because I'm reading a variety of things and some of them are quite short. Graphic novels. YA. Read Alouds. Poetry. Art books. Novellas. Cookbooks. Fluff. All much shorter. It's definitely not War and Peace every time (or even most of the time). 

 

Tam - I had to laugh.  How are your recipes turning out these days?  Do you find that your family has been complaining about burnt food?  I'm picturing you standing at the stove with a book in hand reading while soup boils over and smoke is coming out of the oven.   :lol:

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Oh I agree that there are seasons of life not only for how much we read but what we choose to read!  I have been wading through some serious and depressing things that I would not have been able to read in other years.  My list grew quickly when I was prereading things like Marrin's historical books for my son when he was in junior high.  Graphic novels are often books that only take an hour or so to read--which is why numbers alone are not particularly interesting to me.

 

I sometimes rise early, make some coffee, and snuggle back under the covers with a book.  I either do the puzzles in the newspaper or read while eating lunch.  (I am addicted to the Kakuro puzzle.)  I may read a bit in the late afternoon or while waiting for my husband to arrive home from work--assuming that dinner is in the oven or on the stove.  But I always, always, always read before going to sleep. 

 

This thread has certainly challenged me not only to read more but to broaden my horizons. 

 

 

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Tam - I had to laugh.  How are your recipes turning out these days?  Do you find that your family has been complaining about burnt food?  I'm picturing you standing at the stove with a book in hand reading while soup boils over and smoke is coming out of the oven.   :lol:

 

One of my dearest friends is an elderly woman who always carries a beloved paperback in her handbag and keeps a stack of books and a stool near her stove.  Her food can be done but she may not move it to the table until she reaches a convenient stopping point in her reading!

 

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One of my dearest friends is an elderly woman who always carries a beloved paperback in her handbag and keeps a stack of books and a stool near her stove.  Her food can be done but she may not move it to the table until she reaches a convenient stopping point in her reading!

 

 

I overheard DD tell a friend yesterday that "My mom can only stop a book if she's at the end of it.  Sometimes she doesn't go to sleep and is really tired at breakfast."

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Tam - I had to laugh.  How are your recipes turning out these days?  Do you find that your family has been complaining about burnt food?  I'm picturing you standing at the stove with a book in hand reading while soup boils over and smoke is coming out of the oven.   :lol:

 

Not bad actually. Not any worse than usual, anyway.  :lol:

 

You know all those annoying moments browning or waiting for things to boil? Bing. Maybe I intuitively choose things which aren't too engrossing? If it's more than 5 minutes I set a timer. Under 5 minutes you have smell and sound to alert you because you're standing right there with a book in your hand. Reach the end of the page...check. 

 

Books are ruining my attention span. I can't stand around and flip pancakes for 45m without a book in my hand. ;)

 

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Amy, I have to say that I frequently read while fipping pancakes. Kindle flat on the counter, paragraph or two then flip. I find pancakes very boring to make but the dc's love them so I make them at least twice a week.

 

When I am finishing several books a week it is a sign that I am watching little or no tv and my insomnia is being a problem. The dc's do much of their school independently now but I am generally at home in case they need me during school so I read while they are working. Lately I have been knitting several hours a day while watching tv and sleeping most nights. Quantity of books is way down currently.

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