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staceyobu
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:confused:  There have been yearly cases ever since the disease was first identified in 1976.  Yes, this is the largest outbreak but it hasn't been eradicated in the past.  I'd heard of ebola years before it hit the news this time around.

 

And there is treatment.  It may not be 100% successful but many treatments aren't.  That's why there are mortality rates for all sorts of diseases with treatment like cancer.  

 

We have had periods of time where there was not one known human case? When it popped back up it was sometimes speculated that it wasn't from human to human contact?

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Hunter, I said in my first post is that one of the problems we in the US have is when health and safety protocols (which include haz-mat, ID, etc) collide with bureaucracy. That's NOT "powerful people being selfish and cruel"; rather, that's the irresistible force meeting the immovable object. And you're right that *that* needs to change.

 

And here we can and are treating ebola quite effectively -- IV fluids, electrolytes, anti-nausea/emetic medicines, dialysis should that become necessary, etc. In other words supportive care which is all that is currently available. Our infrastructure allows this.

 

Other countries are set up to respond more flexibly. it is our CHOICE to be so inflexible. There are people that benefit from inflexibility at the expanse of others. That is selfish and cruel.

 

It is not effective treatment to provide the standard type of care that we provide to uninsured people; it allows for contagious diseases to spread. If that man had been a rich, insured, white business man, I'll bet the illness would have been caught on the first hospital visit. It's not effective treatment to quarantine people in contaminated housing without food.

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We have had periods of time where there was not one known human case? When it popped back up it was sometimes speculated that it wasn't from human to human contact?

Bush meat (esp. bats) are a known source of the virus outside of human to human contact.  That's one reason why it probably won't be as big a problem in the US since we don't eat those meats that can harbor the virus.  

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I hope that people who are panicking over Ebola are all getting flu shots this season, because I can guarantee more Americans will die of flu over the next few months than of Ebola.

 

My brother-in-law got talked into a flu vaccine last week. Today he's got the flu. Flu isn't going around here yet, but maybe he'll touch it off!

 

You will *always* find more people to die of something else. But the U.S. has spent billions, maybe trillions, on terrorism prevention etc. and your chances of dying in a terrorist attack are what, not huge, right?

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Excellent article. It's interesting to read that the hospital in question had just had the ebola training, so it should have been fresh in everyone's minds.... so where did the system break down?

 

The points about everyone from the janitor to the guys pushing the wheelchairs, etc. need to know. I am glad nurses are speaking up, but then, that's what nurses do!

 

I thought that ebola patients would be cared for in hospitals with specialized isolation rooms like Emory has. Does every hospital have rooms with reverse air flow, etc.?

 

In my last nursing job the hospital was required to have two negative pressure rooms for every 8 regular beds.  I don't know if that was a company, state, or federal requirement or if it was true for all hospitals.  I know all the med surge / something else wards had airborne isolation rooms, but I don't think the cancer wings did.  And the ER waiting room was one big comfortable, carpeted and impossible to sanitize nightmare.  Also, carpet in every elevator.  They did have air filters with UV lights in every room, but that was the extent of it.

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Bush meat (esp. bats) are a known source of the virus outside of human to human contact.  That's one reason why it probably won't be as big a problem in the US since we don't eat those meats that can harbor the virus.  

 

I never used the word eradicated, but just said that there were times when we had zero people infected. I'm not sure we can accomplish that again. I hope we can.

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My brother-in-law got talked into a flu vaccine last week. Today he's got the flu. Flu isn't going around here yet, but maybe he'll touch it off!

 

You will *always* find more people to die of something else. But the U.S. has spent billions, maybe trillions, on terrorism prevention etc. and your chances of dying in a terrorist attack are what, not huge, right?

 

Do you actually know that what he has is the flu? Has his case been confirmed? There are an awful lot of viruses out there with flu-like symptoms that are not in fact influenza.

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I never used the word eradicated, but just said that there were times when we had zero people infected. I'm not sure we can accomplish that again. I hope we can.

I don't think we can unless there are sources of protein other than bushmeat readily available and affordable in all areas.  And unless education is such that people stop eating them anyway.  

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We have had periods of time where there was not one known human case? When it popped back up it was sometimes speculated that it wasn't from human to human contact?

 

I think it is believed that there is an animal source but they aren't sure. There has been a lot of speculation that it is bats but there isn't enough evidence to back that.

 

http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/the-animal-source-of-the-ebola-outbreak-in-west-africa-eludes-scientists/2014/08/25/fc219a3e-26e8-11e4-8593-da634b334390_story.html

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I don't think we can unless there are sources of protein other than bushmeat readily available and affordable in all areas.  And unless education is such that people stop eating them anyway.  

 

I don't know that will ever be the case. Hunted meat is always going to be cheaper. Many people in the US eat hunted meat, and hunting is necessary to keep some populations down because of a reduction in natural predators. Some illnesses in the US have resulted in the eating of hunted meat but that hasn't stopped people from eating it. Some people prefer game meat and others are in such poverty stricken areas that they have few options.

 

Due to Civil wars and other issues animal husbandry isn't as common in some of the areas that are impacted by Ebola atm, it would help but I don't know how viable it would be in some of the poorer areas, do they have enough water to support animal husbandry?

 

One thing that I saw mentioned in articles was that they will still eat meat even if they don't know how something died. If people didn't do that it would help but I don't know how desperate the situation is for protein. It is a terrible dilemma. 

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This is an interesting article from Smithsonian regarding Ebola, non-human-primates, and vaccines.

 

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/ebola-vaccine-wild-chimps-180951566/?no-ist

 

Ebola virus is a pretty scary disease for humans, but it’s equally scary for great apes. Since 1994, massive outbreaks in Africa have hit chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and killed an estimated third of the world’s gorillas (Gorilla sp.). For the endangered chimps and critically endangered gorillas, the problem now rivals poaching and habitat loss.

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Considering the cost to humanity, I don't think it would be too burdensome to the world to run a mandatory 10-20 minute PSA film about ebola on all international flights.  That film should be clear about ebola symptoms and ask people to voluntarily limit their intimate contact with others if they think they have been exposed to bodily fluids and to head to a hospital immediately if they begin showing symptoms. 

 

If we are not already doing so on immigration and on airline forms, the US and airlines should ask everyone to fill out a form telling where they can be reached (address and phone number) so that if it turns out that they were exposed by someone on a flight, they can be reached for their own safety.

 

One of the other things that concerns me is what about cases showing up in other third world countries, say in South or Central America or in India.  They do NOT have the infrastructure to stop the spread once it gets past a few cases. 

 

Excellent recommendations!

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Most people I know have zero idea that county and state emergency medical services regularly simulate every manner of disaster in order to train for it the best they can. This vs. countries in West Africa who literally do not have an ambulance anywhere in the nation, much less people trained to take care of health concerns in the field.

 

 

 

I actually did know this, hence my reaction to the series of mistakes. How could the responsible parties have run through an ebola (or other similar disease) scenario and no one thought of which department would be in charge of cleaning up vomit in the community, or had a protocol to check that people in quarantine had food and other necessities they needed (so that they would stay in quarantine, etc.) Those things just seem like they would have been covered in a simulation, KWIM?

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I don't know why you'd compare Ebola to measles. We have vaccination for measles . Where people don't vaccinate infection rates go up.

 

I don't know how factual it is but I remember reading stories about plague or maybe smallpox where the overall attitude of the rich was... Oh well while the poor we're getting it. Until it reached a point where so many poor people had if it spread to the wealthy. Something like that. It might not happen here but I'm pretty sure the best way to stop it is responding to the needs of those who can't help themselves due to lack of resources.

 

One article said people died overnight outside because treatment centres couldn't handle the disease safely after dark. Surely at least some decent lighting can be provided somehow to help with this.

 

I think the aid workers helping are incredibly brave and hope they are recognised for what they do.

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http://boston.cbslocal.com/2014/10/03/nbc-news-cameraman-from-providence-diagnosed-with-ebola/

 

Hmm. This is about the cameraman in Liberia who contracted ebola. He thinks perhaps he caught it when trying to help decontaminate a car. He was wearing protective gear, but something splashed on him... then my mind goes to the guy with the powerwasher with no protective gear whatsoever. I really hope he didn't get exposed because it seems that someone should have been coordinating the clean-up efforts who knew how to accomplish it safely.

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http://boston.cbslocal.com/2014/10/03/nbc-news-cameraman-from-providence-diagnosed-with-ebola/

 

Hmm. This is about the cameraman in Liberia who contracted ebola. He thinks perhaps he caught it when trying to help decontaminate a car. He was wearing protective gear, but something splashed on him... then my mind goes to the guy with the powerwasher with no protective gear whatsoever. I really hope he didn't get exposed because it seems that someone should have been coordinating the clean-up efforts who knew how to accomplish it safely.

I am concerned about power washer guy.

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Other countries are set up to respond more flexibly. it is our CHOICE to be so inflexible. There are people that benefit from inflexibility at the expanse of others. That is selfish and cruel.

 

It is not effective treatment to provide the standard type of care that we provide to uninsured people; it allows for contagious diseases to spread. If that man had been a rich, insured, white business man, I'll bet the illness would have been caught on the first hospital visit. It's not effective treatment to quarantine people in contaminated housing without food.

 

Who is benefitting right now? The man is now receiving the best, supportive treatment we can give him. Yes, he should have been put in isolation at the first trip to the hospital. That was a human error, not a failure of protocol. I'll even grant that possibly your hypothetical insured, rich white man *may* have been treated differently. But maybe not - I've the treatment (meaning customer service) swamped and overtired ER docs & nurses can give people - anyone regardless of SE status. I've advocated for those patients when I've brought them in. HOWEVER, I believe that the same supportive care (medical care) will be given to anyone who presents with the relevant symptoms & history because no one wants this to spread.

 

Comparing medical care which is what I've been talking about with public health/safety protocols (quarantines, monitoring, etc) is really not a good comparison. I agree that the quarantine of the man's friends/family should have been handled differently. I think the public health & safety arm is catching up to the medical arm.

 

And just to make myself clear when I use the word treatment I'm specifically referring to medical treatment. Quaranting people, disinfecting and decontaminating residences, et al is not medical treatment. And, as I said, should have been handled better from the start.

 

I fully agree that the way un- & underinsured people are treated in this country is shameful. But confounding the general treatment of this population (and they're not all poor; many middle class people fall into this subgroup) with the specific protocols for handling acute communicable disease outbreaks does a disservice to both issues. They are different.

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If the disease spreads among the quarantined, our methods of delivery are probably to blame for that. Good equipment isn't going to fix that people got sick in the first place. The man went to the hospital before he started shedding or when he was shedding less. Then we locked people up without food and among contagion. Other countries don't act like this that have the amount of resources that we do.

 

I stringently disagree with this.  The woman was his girlfriend, sharing the same bed (sleeping space) with him, whether she was intimate with him or not.  She was exposed before they were quarantined, although I agree that the quarantine will probably expose the family to an additional viral load. 

 

I am aghast at how all of this has been handled.  (My son takes more precautions cleaning the drain at Starbucks than the two workmen with the power washer.) 

 

I don't know why this surprises me.  We've lived through Andrew and Katrina. 

 

I guess my mind just boggles that this could be botched so badly when so much is at stake, not only for the family, but also for the public.  This was absolutely avoidable, and I would think after all the freakin' drills that the gov't has spent millions on, I would think that a small-potatoes incident with a family of four or five people could be managed, and they could be cared for properly. 

 

 

 

  

 

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I am aghast at how all of this has been handled.  (My son takes more precautions cleaning the drain at Starbucks than the two workmen with the power washer.) 

 

I don't know why this surprises me.  We've lived through Andrew and Katrina. 

 

I guess my mind just boggles that this could be botched so badly when so much is at stake, not only for the family, but also for the public.  This was absolutely avoidable, and I would think after all the freakin' drills that the gov't has spent millions on, I would think that a small-potatoes incident with a family of four or five people could be managed, and they could be cared for properly. 

 

I am aghast, as well.  I am a volunteer at the local Humane Society, and an employee and I took more precautions when cleaning up diarrhea from a sick puppy this week than the power washer guy took.  For an illness that is not communicable to people.

 

Maybe Nick from the Humane Society and I should have gone over to Dallas to help clean up the mess there.  :/

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I am aghast, as well.  I am a volunteer at the local Humane Society, and an employee and I took more precautions when cleaning up diarrhea from a sick puppy this week than the power washer guy took.  For an illness that is not communicable to people.

 

Maybe Nick from the Humane Society and I should have gone over to Dallas to help clean up the mess there.  :/

 

I'd like your post, but I don't want YOU anywhere near it.   I'm fond of you.  :blush5:   I have waders, a wash tub, and a bottle of Basic-G.  I'll go.

 

(Knock wood.)

 

 

ETA:  and I have a bonafide respirator since dh is working with that wretched toluene-based cleaner these days.

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(M)y mind goes to the guy with the powerwasher with no protective gear whatsoever. I really hope he didn't get exposed because it seems that someone should have been coordinating the clean-up efforts who knew how to accomplish it safely.

 

I am concerned about power washer guy.

 

I am aghast at how all of this has been handled.  (My son takes more precautions cleaning the drain at Starbucks than the two workmen with the power washer.)  

 

I am aghast, as well.  I am a volunteer at the local Humane Society, and an employee and I took more precautions when cleaning up diarrhea from a sick puppy this week than the power washer guy took.  For an illness that is not communicable to people.

 

I know, right?  Don't even get me started on rules & regulations pertaining to dairy farming management practices.  I am just…boggled.  Of course I don't want anyone else ~ such as the poor man pressure washing the vomit ~ to contract this disease.  At the same time, if they don't, what lessons are learned?  Is the take-away that it's okay to let people spend DAYS on end in a tainted environment?  To send in underpaid, under-informed laborers to clean up in a manner that provides no protection whatsoever to them or the general public?  It's a travesty.  It isn't just about how many people do or don't get ill.  It's a deeper issue, imo.

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They sent in hazmat teams to clean the place, and the entire family has been relocated to a house in an undisclosed location, use of which was donated when no other place would take them.

 

Glad to hear some good news, and may heaven bless whoever donated the use of the house.

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I know, right?  Don't even get me started on rules & regulations pertaining to dairy farming management practices.  I am just…boggled.  Of course I don't want anyone else ~ such as the poor man pressure washing the vomit ~ to contract this disease.  At the same time, if they don't, what lessons are learned?  Is the take-away that it's okay to let people spend DAYS on end in a tainted environment?  To send in underpaid, under-informed laborers to clean up in a manner that provides no protection whatsoever to them or the general public?  It's a travesty.  It isn't just about how many people do or don't get ill.  It's a deeper issue, imo.

 

The thing that is really infuriating to me is that power wash guy was not one of the original contacts. His contact was entirely preventable. Are they going to be following him now, too?

 

Someone is asleep at the wheel.

 

And for the people in the apartment with contaminated stuff... if they weren't already infected, wasn't the chance increased  by leaving them to take care of it themselves? Who knows if she even had gloves in the home. Not everyone does. I did read they had bleach.

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I know, right? Don't even get me started on rules & regulations pertaining to dairy farming management practices. I am just…boggled. Of course I don't want anyone else ~ such as the poor man pressure washing the vomit ~ to contract this disease. At the same time, if they don't, what lessons are learned? Is the take-away that it's okay to let people spend DAYS on end in a tainted environment? To send in underpaid, under-informed laborers to clean up in a manner that provides no protection whatsoever to them or the general public? It's a travesty. It isn't just about how many people do or don't get ill. It's a deeper issue, imo.

It's probably cheaper to the agency if he dies than for them to take the appropriate safety precautions. Assuming Texas worker's comp system is anything similar to Georgia's. :(

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It's probably cheaper to the agency if he dies than for them to take the appropriate safety precautions. Assuming Texas worker's comp system is anything similar to Georgia's. :(

 

Okay, what, REALLY? I'm not a person who is sue-happy, but if that were to happen somebody should get sued BIG TIME by the men's families.

 

I'm amazed at the gross level of negligence on PUBLIC display there. It does not inspire confidence about what may or may not be happening out of sight.

 

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I don't know but it happens with all sorts. Think asbestos cleanup. People imagine asbestos removalists have some kind of crazy training on how to do it safely. Well from what I've seen they might put a dust mask on and hose it down. They're just people desperate for work and attracted by higher pay. Cleanup in Fukushima seems to have been similar. There are people who don't have a lot of options who will take risks to get some extra money. And there are people who will use them.

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Okay, what, REALLY? I'm not a person who is sue-happy, but if that were to happen somebody should get sued BIG TIME by the men's families.

 

I'm amazed at the gross level of negligence on PUBLIC display there. It does not inspire confidence about what may or may not be happening out of sight.

 

You can't sue in civil court if it falls under worker's comp which 99.9% of workplace accidents do. Diseases are even harder to get covered, but this would be a fairly clear-cut case. If he died without dependents here, the company would pay $10K (I think--I haven't checked if that has been increased recently) to a state agency and some paltry sum toward burial costs. Death cases are horribly, heartbreakingly sad to lay out the "worth" to families.

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Considering the cost to humanity, I don't think it would be too burdensome to the world to run a mandatory 10-20 minute PSA film about ebola on all international flights.  That film should be clear about ebola symptoms and ask people to voluntarily limit their intimate contact with others if they think they have been exposed to bodily fluids and to head to a hospital immediately if they begin showing symptoms. 

 

Surely because most international flights have almost zero likelihood of having anyone exposed to the virus on board?  It seems pretty pointless for all flights within Europe - say Ireland to Spain, and Denmark to Norway, Poland to Germany etc. to waste people's time on this.

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My brother-in-law got talked into a flu vaccine last week. Today he's got the flu. Flu isn't going around here yet, but maybe he'll touch it off!

 

You will *always* find more people to die of something else. But the U.S. has spent billions, maybe trillions, on terrorism prevention etc. and your chances of dying in a terrorist attack are what, not huge, right?

It does take the flu shot several weeks to confer immunity. 

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Flu vaccines only protect from certain flus.  My doctor always tries to push me getting the vaccine.  I asked him if it would prevent me from getting ALL strains of flu.  He admitted it wouldn't.

 

I don't get flu shots.  I almost had to once due to my job and the fear that year of the flu being so bad, but I ended up not having to.

 

Dawn

 

 

My brother-in-law got talked into a flu vaccine last week. Today he's got the flu. Flu isn't going around here yet, but maybe he'll touch it off!

 

You will *always* find more people to die of something else. But the U.S. has spent billions, maybe trillions, on terrorism prevention etc. and your chances of dying in a terrorist attack are what, not huge, right?

 

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Surely because most international flights have almost zero likelihood of having anyone exposed to the virus on board?  It seems pretty pointless for all flights within Europe - say Ireland to Spain, and Denmark to Norway, Poland to Germany etc. to waste people's time on this.

 

I disagree.  It's ten to twenty minutes of a passenger's life.  They don't have to watch it again on subsequent flights.  It's a deadly threat, and this is a perfect place to educate people, since international travel increases the risk for all kinds of infectious disease spread, not just for ebola. 

 

Also, people are NOT monolithic.  I've learned to assume nothing about people who are traveling:  they are almost always much more wonderful in the diversity of their actions (where they've been, what they are doing and why, etc.) than I could have imagined or assumed from looking at them. 

 

As long as people are traveling by air in and out of the outbreak areas, I think this would be a rather low-impact, inexpensive tool that would be helpful.

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I disagree.  It's ten to twenty minutes of a passenger's life.  They don't have to watch it again on subsequent flights.  It's a deadly threat, and this is a perfect place to educate people, since international travel increases the risk for all kinds of infectious disease spread, not just for ebola. 

 

Also, people are NOT monolithic.  I've learned to assume nothing about people who are traveling:  they are almost always much more wonderful in the diversity of their actions (where they've been, what they are doing and why, etc.) than I could have imagined or assumed from looking at them. 

 

As long as people are traveling by air in and out of the outbreak areas, I think this would be a rather low-impact, inexpensive tool that would be helpful.

 

Surely they will have to watch it on all flights, not just once?  How would you be exempted if you'd watched it already?  Air travel around Europe is rather like internal air travel in the US - many people fly multiple times a month on business, and frankly those people would pay as much attention as they do to the video telling them where the emergency exits, and the whistle on their lifejacket are!

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Flu vaccines only protect from certain flus.  My doctor always tries to push me getting the vaccine.  I asked him if it would prevent me from getting ALL strains of flu.  He admitted it wouldn't.

 

I don't get flu shots.  I almost had to once due to my job and the fear that year of the flu being so bad, but I ended up not having to.

 

Dawn

 

Admitted? It isn't like you were getting him to confess to secret information.

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My brother-in-law got talked into a flu vaccine last week. Today he's got the flu. Flu isn't going around here yet, but maybe he'll touch it off!

 

 

 

Has he tested positive for the flu? If so, which strain? If he got the vaccine last week and has the flu today he either 1. Doesn't actually have influenza. 2. Has a strain not covered by the vaccine. 3. Had already been exposed. Re: that last one - The flu vaccine will not work if you've already been exposed to the flu and it takes 2 weeks to work, so you can actually get the flu if you've had the vaccine. That's why the CDC and other health officials recommend getting the vaccine as early in the season as you possibly can.

 

Full disclosure since there's not yet a poll - I am not worried about Ebola and I vaccinate.

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Surely they will have to watch it on all flights, not just once?  How would you be exempted if you'd watched it already?  Air travel around Europe is rather like internal air travel in the US - many people fly multiple times a month on business, and frankly those people would pay as much attention as they do to the video telling them where the emergency exits, and the whistle on their lifejacket are!

 

That's kind of the whole point.  They will watch it the first time it is aired (because of their self-interest and because they are requested to by the polite in-flight attendants) and then after that they'll opt out--their choice.  But, given human nature, most new travelers or travelers who have not traveled in a long time will find it of interest. 

 

It would also be a simple thing to reference a seat-pocket brochure in 8 or 10 languages, in case there is a language barrier.

 

When the outbreak dies down, the video/brochure goes away.

 

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I'm not terribly worried about Ebola, though I am deeply concerned for the welfare of the affected people in Dallas (especially the family in quarantine, I just can't imagine how they feel right now, and I hope that they are well cared for at the moment). DH flies internationally frequently, and usually through the airport through which the Ebola patient in Dallas flew. He is not feeling panicked about Ebola, nor am I. We take normal hygienic precautions. We do worry a lot during flu season, as we have kids with asthma and histories of pneumonia in the house. My understanding is that flu is more readily contagious than Ebola, and regardless of that, greater numbers of people with the flu increase the chances of catching it.

 

My kids are fully vaccinated, and on time. As per our doctor's advice, DS and I don't get flu shots, but if our immune systems allowed for it, we'd vaccinate for flu, too.

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How long does it take to confer the flu?

 

Two to three weeks.  And you cannot get the flu from the vaccine, it is dead.  You could get flu symptoms from FluMist...that is a live, but weakened vaccine.  Most healthy people will not show symptoms from it, but those with a weakened immune system could.  Those who are immunocompromised, or older than 50, should not have FluMist.

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From my friend who is a specialist in infectious disease: "It's not that easily spread. And not like that. Again I reiterate - not waterborne not respiratory not on surfaces. Not foodbourne. Need heavy body fluid contact. Repeated contact. Viable source." (referring to surfaces touched by the sick.) She said she is in daily contact with things more contagious than Ebola, the media has just latched onto this one.

 

The best BBQ I have had was Perry Foster's in Warrensburg, MO; tied for 2nd would be Kehde's in Sedalia, MO and Dreamland in Birmingham, AL. 3rd is Van's Pig Stand here in Moore, OK. I have had BBQ in Texas, it was good - but not Perry Foster's!

 

I put beans in my chili.

 

I think I have covered all relevant topics from this thread. :)

 

 

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Why are we comparing Hantavirus to Ebola?  Hantavirus is not as as easy to get, and it has a lower mortality rate.  Even more importantly, it is not transferred person to person.  Ebola is much easier to get, with a mortality rate of 50-90% and is transferred person to person.  From my understanding, Lassa Fever has a much lower mortality rate.

 

.  

 

 

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Yikes, another Liberian on a flight from Brussels with ebola symptoms, and apparently vomited on the plane.  This time the CDC staff in hazmat gear met the plane.  How scary for those travelers.

 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2780696/BREAKING-NEWS-CDC-officials-rush-Newark-Airport-meet-Liberian-passenger-flying-Brussels-showed-symptoms-Ebola.html

 

Good news!  He does not have ebloa: http://www.foxnews.com/us/2014/10/04/sick-passenger-removed-from-united-flight-by-medical-personnel-in-hazmat-suits/

 

ETA:  The story that I linked has changed.  This source is no longer reporting that he does not have ebola.  

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Enlgand and France have suspended flights.

 

Air France suspends flights to Ebola-hit Sierra Leone at request of French government ... days after crew signed safety petition and refused to board flights 

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/travel_news/article-2735698/Citing-Ebola-Air-France-suspends-flights.html#ixzz3FCub45GO 
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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/travel_news/article-2735698/Citing-Ebola-Air-France-suspends-flights.html

 

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-28550906

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