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Laura Corin

Kitchen before and after photos

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...Now I want to beg for a picture of the view.   :)

 

It's too distant and hazy - five miles away.  

 

L

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It's beautiful!!

 

How long did this take, and how did you survive without the kitchen in the process? Curious because I'm considering this in the next few years with my own. 

 

Theoretically five days, but what with taking down a wall, and Ikea just having changed kitchen cupboard style and the joiners having to learn anew.... more like two weeks.  We were very tired of microwave meals by the end.  And then we had a vinyl disaster (the flooring was damaged just by normal use within days and we had to get it replaced) and bits and pieces, it's been a few months getting it really finished.  And the window still isn't done....

 

It's lovely! I especially like the rug under the table. Is that from Ikea, too?

 

Thanks,  Yes, that's Ikea.  I wanted to mark out the 'dining room' as separate by using the rug.  

 

The chairs are from John Lewis, and the table is from a young designer whom we met twenty years ago when we lived in London - the table is looking a bit battered now, but I still like the shape.

 

L

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Theoretically five days, but what with taking down a wall, and Ikea just having changed kitchen cupboard style and the joiners having to learn anew.... more like two weeks.  We were very tired of microwave meals by the end.  And then we had a vinyl disaster (the flooring was damaged just by normal use within days and we had to get it replaced) and bits and pieces, it's been a few months getting it really finished.  And the window still isn't done....

 

 

Thanks,  Yes, that's Ikea.  I wanted to mark out the 'dining room' as separate by using the rug.  

 

The chairs are from John Lewis, and the table is from a young designer whom we met twenty years ago when we lived in London - the table is looking a bit battered now, but I still like the shape.

 

L

 

That's it? Wow! In the grand scheme of things, that's not very long. That gives me hope for my own remodel someday...

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Below the hob are two big drawers that contain all my pans and lids. To the right is the boiler that runs the heating and hot water for the entire house - it's a tankless 'combi' boiler.

 

L

 

Ah. :-)

 

Another curious American vs British vocabulary thing: We call it a water heater*, y'all call it a boiler. :-) And in most places, building codes require water heaters to be some place other than in the house itself, as in a garage. Tankless water heaters are not nearly as common as the tanks.

 

I remember the designers in "Changing Rooms" camouflaging boilers in the kitchens they redesigned, because the older ones were not nearly as unobtrusive as your newer one. :-)

 

*Many people say "hot water heater," but that's like saying "tuna fish." What other kind of water would be in this tank which heats up water? And what else is there besides "fish" that is named "tuna"?

 

Monday morning meanderings. :-)

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Ah. :-)

 

Another curious American vs British vocabulary thing: We call it a water heater*, y'all call it a boiler. :-) And in most places, building codes require water heaters to be some place other than in the house itself, as in a garage. 

 

 

What happens in townhouses, or other places without garages?  Most in-town houses in Britain don't have garages - people park on the street - so it wouldn't work here.  Is it a safety thing?  

 

Traditionally in Britain there was an 'airing cabinet' in the house where the boiler and/or water tank lived, and where towels were also stored.  However, the new boilers are so efficient and well-insulated that they don't put off heat to keep the towels aired.  Our boiler is big, but this kind of wall-mounted one is common in kitchens.

 

L

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What happens in townhouses, or other places without garages?  Most in-town houses in Britain don't have garages - people park on the street - so it wouldn't work here.  Is it a safety thing?  

 

Traditionally in Britain there was an 'airing cabinet' in the house where the boiler and/or water tank lived, and where towels were also stored.  However, the new boilers are so efficient and well-insulated that they don't put off heat to keep the towels aired.  Our boiler is big, but this kind of wall-mounted one is common in kitchens.

 

L

 

Sometimes they are installed in little lean-to buildings. Sometimes there is a central unit somewhere in the building instead of each unit having its own.

 

Yes, it is a safety issue. A 40-gallon water heater that goes bad and leaks into your house causes amazing damage. And apparently there have been exploding water heaters, or gas leaks (some are gas-fueled, some are electric).

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Yes, it is a safety issue. A 40-gallon water heater that goes bad and leaks into your house causes amazing damage. And apparently there have been exploding water heaters, or gas leaks (some are gas-fueled, some are electric).

 

 

That does make a difference - in modern UK boilers, there are only a few litres of water in the boiler at a time.

 

Thinking further though: most central heating systems in the UK are based on piping hot water around the house into radiators.  At all times, when the heating is on, the house is carrying many hundreds of gallons of hot water.   At all other times, it's many hundreds of gallons of cold water.  It's a risk we accept.

 

Landlords by law have to get their gas central heating systems checked every year for safety.  For the rest of us, annual servicing is advised but it's up to us to make our own decisions.

 

L

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Love! Can I invite myself over for a cup of coffee in your kitchen? :)

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Ah. :-)

 

Another curious American vs British vocabulary thing: We call it a water heater*, y'all call it a boiler. :-) And in most places, building codes require water heaters to be some place other than in the house itself, as in a garage. Tankless water heaters are not nearly as common as the tanks.

 

 

Interesting. In every house I've lived in, in several states, the water heater has always been in the basement. I never even considered that it could be located elsewhere. And yes, the times it leaked, we were very glad our basement wasn't finished and nothing too valuable was down there!

 

You new kitchen looks beautiful Laura!

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What happens in townhouses, or other places without garages? Most in-town houses in Britain don't have garages - people park on the street - so it wouldn't work here. Is it a safety thing?

 

Traditionally in Britain there was an 'airing cabinet' in the house where the boiler and/or water tank lived, and where towels were also stored. However, the new boilers are so efficient and well-insulated that they don't put off heat to keep the towels aired. Our boiler is big, but this kind of wall-mounted one is common in kitchens.

 

L

In our town home in VA the water heater was in a closet downstairs.

 

ETA I love your kitchen windows. So much light and air. Very nice remodel.

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 I hope you *looooove* working in the new spaces. 

 

I like sitting in it a lot.  

 

Even though I cook mostly from scratch (out of duty), I actually don't like cooking.  At least the space is less irritating now....

 

L

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