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I need some advice as to how to do writing with my newly 9 year old DS.  He has ADHD and dyspraxia which I realize challenge him in doing writing work (double whammy- attention to his thoughts long enough to finish writing the words and the muscle tone/control of handwriting).  We've done WWE 1 and 2, IEW through writing a paragraph, and now BJU English.  The WWE just got so repetitive (for both of us), he had total freak-outs with IEW when we reached the time and intensity of combining multiple paragraphs for storytelling so our most recent effort was BJU English.  I thought that would be a gentler product because of the back and forth between writing and grammar.  Awesome, we don't have to do writing everyday.  Today was our first day in a writing lesson of actually moving thoughts to paper and it wasn't pretty.  It was 5 sentences!  His paragraph draft probably totaled no more than 20 words as he made them as simple as he possibly could.  Example, in explaining how to play "Hide and Seek," he wrote...."Then, the seeker seeks."  We've already started typing in hopes that maybe it's the actual hand on pencil on paper that's causing the frustration.  I just feel so tired of the ongoing battle.  He HAS to do writing, right?  At third grade, I really don't think this is too much to ask but I trust the collective wisdom of the group.  Any suggestions?

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Having been there with a kid who has dyslexia and dyspraxia, I would say no. In third grade he does not have to do writing.

 

I wish I had done it differently.

 

My recommendation is to have him continue to narrate to you, and be willing to write for him, and wait until he's a little older to really buckle down on writing.

 

My ds didn't make any substantial progress with writing until 5th grade. We started using Writing Skills from EPS. It's a program for kids with learning issues, and it has helped my ds a lot. But I also think a lot of it is just maturity.

 

I wouldn't make it a huge issue or battle in 3rd grade.

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For a child that has dyspraxia, you are asking way too much.  You need to be scribing for him and seeking alternatives to the pencil.  I would hold off teaching him to type and have him answer questions orally.  Your son's dyspraxia may confound his ability to type.  Definitely hold off with the typing and formal writing instruction until 5th grade.

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Agree with Tara and Heathermomster.  Scribe for him as much as possible.  Keep teaching it but in very small chunks for expected output.  Maybe look into Dragon Naturally Speaking, Ginger, Inspiration software programs to help him get out his thoughts and organize them.  Do not let the physical act of writing drive him away from wanting to learn or wanting to write in general.  If you slow it down, keep it in small parts, give him a chance to mature and develop, and scribe scribe scribe that will help more.  And let him use a dry erase board with lines on it for some things.

 

And expose him to LOTS of literature.  If he is hearing/reading lots of quality literature he should be able to absorb a lot of grammar/vocabulary/concepts which will help his writing quite a bit later on.

 

Hugs.  BTDT.

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My boys (Aspergers and ADD) did not write significantly until they were at least 12!   All we had were battles at those ages, and no progress no matter how hard I pushed.  ITS NOT WORTH IT!!  Don't do what I did!  My oldest (who was dysgraphic) is now a beautiful writer (now that he can type....but he couldn't type at 9....we tried!)   Your son will have some catch-up to do when he is older, but your son is just not developmentally ready, yet, and the catch up later isn't that bad.  I do wish I had done oral grammar/language work when they were younger, though, especially for the middle two who struggle a bit there.  Spend the time you would devote to writing either reading aloud or doing oral grammar....he'll get a lot more out of that than being pushed to do something he's not ready to tackle.

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My son hated writing too and although he doesn't have a adhd, he definitely has similar behavior.  After trying several writing programs we finally have had success with Classical Writing.  I think what he likes about it is that it's broken up into baby steps and the lesson sequence is so predictable.  

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I appreciate this thread.

 

We don't have any diagnosed issues, but writing is so hard for DS (8).    

 

We were at an Apple camp today making an iBook, and I tried so hard to keep my expectations in check.  I dictated for DS, but found myself looking at the other 8 year olds who were doing so well on their own.  

 

Hearing advice to keep on keeping on with narrating/dictating is a big encouragement. Now, off to finalize writing plans for this year with this in mind...  ;)

 

Stella

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I appreciate this thread.

 

We don't have any diagnosed issues, but writing is so hard for DS (8).    

 

We were at an Apple camp today making an iBook, and I tried so hard to keep my expectations in check.  I dictated for DS, but found myself looking at the other 8 year olds who were doing so well on their own.  

 

Hearing advice to keep on keeping on with narrating/dictating is a big encouragement. Now, off to finalize writing plans for this year with this in mind...   ;)

 

Stella

:grouphug:  :grouphug:  :grouphug:

 

I understand completely.  It isn't always easy to watch the next kid over just breezing through while your own struggles with things that seem like they should be fairly simple.  Only they aren't.  If you look up the description of all that has to happen for successful writing to occur (from muscle control to thought processes) it is amazing that anyone writes successfully before the age of 30.   :)  For most, those processes occur in tandem and with a little instruction and practice the skills develop without too much issue.  But when even one of those processes breaks down, or there is a bit of developmental delay, writing can become a monumental task, and extremely discouraging without lots of support, encouragement and scaffolding...and time.

 

Best wishes.

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Just wanted to say I also scribed for my son at this age. I worked to gradually increase his writing stamina. A lot of times I let him copy what I scribed for him over a couple of days. I found Essentials in Writing when my kids were older, but that really breaks things down into incremental parts--you might take a look at that. 

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