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French Cursive Handwriting

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I didn't realize that some of the vertical cursive fonts/hands I have seen and like are French. Now I can talk all fancy about what people have been telling me is too "plain" and "childish".

 

Penmanship2.jpg

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I personally believe a slight slant - 5 or 10 degree slant - is more natural and comfortable for a right-handed writer.

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This is what I have been using.

They are in french so you have to hit the google translate-

 

http://www.momes.net/education/ecriture/graphismes.html

 

http://www.pepins-et-citrons.fr/les-majuscules-cursives-a2708213

 

i got the ideas for pens and paper here-

 

http://blog.shopwritersbloc.com/general/should_children_learn_cursive_handwriting.html

 

 

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Will have to show this to 9yo. She is the one who pushed cursive in our house and now wants to learn French, because "it's pretty." She'll enjoy playing with this.

 

Is there anything that shows how the letters connect?

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Most of these fonts are lower case cursive, and uppercase manuscript or simple French uppercase

http://www.edu.xunta.es/centros/ceipfrions/es/node/101

 

I've read French Parents saying the Cursif font is used in their schools. This one is fancy, maybe too fancy.

http://www.dafont.com/cursif.font

 

I think I might like this one best.

police particulière abcCPEM Ã  télécharger)

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You can make worksheets here. It took me awhile to figure out the options.

http://cursivecole.fr/ecriture1.php

 

Click "Majuscules en script" and the uppercase will be in manuscript. Leave it unclicked and the uppercase will be in cursive.

 

Click "expert" and you can make choices about individual letter styles, and right or left handed.

droiter means right-handed

gaucher means left-handed

 

 

 

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I personally believe a slight slant - 5 or 10 degree slant - is more natural and comfortable for a right-handed writer.

 

I think the German fonts are almost like the French, but with slant.

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I think I'm going to go with a combination of the Cursif and abcCPEM fonts. They are almost identical; just the uppercase X and Z are different, and often any copywork I prepare, will not include either of those 2 letters.

 

Between the 2 fonts, the student will be able to see exactly what a pencil/ballpoint pen looks like, and also be able to practice the exact heights of the letters  on the lines.

 

I have a LOT of lefties. These French fonts will allow me to accommodate the lefties' need for a vertical hand/font without the stigma of a remedial/child's hand. 

 

And when the basics are covered, they can choose a chart (or combination of charts) that they like best, and individualize their hand.

 

French cursive isn't that different from Spalding. I should be able to convert my handwriting in a few days, if I really work at it. It's mostly just longer loops, not closing the "p", and some fancier uppercase letters.

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I've tried downloading documents from this site, but cannot open them. They are .fxp files? Can they be opened an a mac?

 That must not be the one I printed from. I'm not home but I will put up a better link tonight,

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I've been making copywork with the fonts. I hate making copywork with fonts. Yuck! And the pages stink of cheap burned ink.

 

I read French teachers write the copywork in each student notebook. I'm going to use a chart to get mine right, and do what I've been doing all along, and continue to do it by hand.

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Yes, I'm definitely going to use a chart. I used a little white out and a black pen, and changed a few things on my favorite chart, and I'm having no trouble writing models that are more than good enough for students to copy.

 

Now as well as using a "French" hand, I can defend my handwritten models as the French way. :lol:

 

Does anyone have links to french notebooks other than the one I posted above?

 

I had been planning on maybe studying Spanish, but I think I want to study French right now. It would help just to know a few easy words like, right, left, and narrow when studying French handwriting.

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I have a LOT of lefties. These French fonts will allow me to accommodate the lefties' need for a vertical hand/font without the stigma of a remedial/child's hand. 

 

And when the basics are covered, they can choose a chart (or combination of charts) that they like best, and individualize their hand.

I was just wondering about this, so I rechecked this thread. This is wonderful stuff.  My 5yo is a Lefty and honestly, I think I'm procrastinating teaching her to write because of that.

 

Is the thought that this font (which I was just going to let my 9yo play with) would be an easy font for 5yo to learn as a left? We have not gotten that deep into the Cursive First font that we couldn't switch . . . and I see that all the lowercase letters (except m, n, and a few at the end of the alphabet) begin at the baseline---which I think makes so much sense about Cursive first.

 

Hmmmmmm . . .

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Some of the French fonts start on the baseline and some don't. That is one of the options at the worksheet generator. Also the option to use manuscript or cursive uppercase, is a great option for K-2.

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I have an iPad, but my purchased apps don't work. I gave up on the ipad and used a Kindle HDX for awhile, but ended out with a whole other set of problems, the worst of which was that I couldn't see the screen well enough. I have some major eye stuff going on right now, that won't be resolved any time soon. Such is MY life. :banghead:

 

I have spent 2 hours trying to resolve this last night and this morning. I give up on apps again. :banghead: I guess I just need to use the ipad for email and document reading. It does that well. I guess I should be thankful for that.

 

Two days ago, I gave up on the french cursive. I was writing it quite prettily, but needed graph paper. That was all fine for awhile and then...real life happened and I need to write a whole lot real fast, teeny tiny, on unlined paper and I had to revert back to my old handwriting.

 

ME and MY life just cannot sustain such a superfluous style, and that's just the way it is. Every 6 months or so, I do this. I think I want to adopt something fancier than Spalding cursive and uppercase manuscript. I have good reasons. The hands are beautiful and useful for others. They just are not for ME. Other people wear high heals and skirts and blouses. I wear hiking books and sweats. It's not as easy to change handwriting as shoes and clothes, and I can't even handle fancier clothing SOMETIMES. What makes me thing I can handle fancier handwriting ALWAYS.

 

My handwriting is like black yoga pants. It gets the job done, even when underdressed for the situation.

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My handwriting is like black yoga pants. It gets the job done, even when underdressed for the situation.

 

Such a good analogy. I think the only way french cursive is normal is if you are french and have never written any differently. I think of it as fun, like trying to write in runes. I don't think it will ever replace my handwriting style.

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Ooh pretty! Makes me want to switch from Getty -Dubay italic. But then ... those super fancy uppercase letters ... I know I will ditch them when Im in a hurry. I like the italic uppercase, a nice blend of simple with pretty. But it's the lowercase I find myself wanting the connecting tails on f/g/j/y.

 

I'm going to be using the shortcut to cursive with my two starting next month. With italic. So I need to make up my mind now. Since I'm teaching it that way, I wonder if I should teach them the letters beginning at the baseline? After going through the shortcut to cursive I want to start my oldest on cursive copywork out of the McGuffey first reader. My daughter I'm starting in the primer. Im considering teaching her cursive as the letters come up in McGuffey instead of using the shortcut to cursive.

Good luck choosing!

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You know, I taught myself some calligraphy in my late teens/early twenties. I never had horrible handwriting, but it really improved, even day to day, with the addition of calligraphy work. Even to this day, my daily, fast handwriting (mix of cursive and print) has changed because of that time. My lowercase Fs are faincier, I write my As differently, my W is entirely based on the calligraphy style I learned, and I just learned to have a 'hand,' at all.

 

If one has time (that's a BIG IF), I think there's value in playing with some of these things. Pick a letter you love and want to incorporate into your style. Let a child who is interested, play around with the font sheet. Will my 9yo actually change her style after being exposed to this? I hope not . . . she's still really ingraining her style, still has a cursive capital J to work on, etc. But, will she enjoy the play and maybe come back to it when she's 15 and develop her own beautiful, personal hand---maybe so. Her Kindergarten unteachableness and desire to write fancy are after all why we found Cursive First in the first place. ;)

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I found a generator for Seyes ruled paper.  http://www.desmoulins.fr/index.php?pg=scripts!online!feuilles!form_feuille_gros_carreaux

** this generator is nice because it will generate a letter-sized document. You can also change the settings for whatever color lines you like. 

 

The standard Seyes is 2mm/space for a total of 8mm each row.

 

The ruling for "visually impaired" is 2.5mm/space for a total of 10mm each row. My French is really rusty, but that is what I gathered.

 

Teachers will typically start their kids off w/4mm/space = 16mm/row. When the letter are *perfect*, then they move on to 3mm/space = 12mm/row.

 

It appears the kids may stay at 3mm for quite a while...

 

I bought a bunch of Seyes ruled things for my kids, and standard Seyes is quite small for a kid not yet in middle school. It is very difficult to get your hands on the "agrandi" Seyes ruled paper. France won't directly distribute the paper to the US, and very few sellers on Amazon.fr or ebay.fr will ship to the US. I haven't tried to purchase it, because the cost would be exorbitant. 

 

My kids have gotten rather...sloppy w/their cursive, probably because the lines were too small for them. I may be printing a lot of paper to remedy!

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I’m bumping this old thread ask if anyone was able to buy, in the US, any ready-made worksheets using French cursive. A la the Zaner Blosser but in this style? Anyone? 

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36 minutes ago, madteaparty said:

I’m bumping this old thread ask if anyone was able to buy, in the US, any ready-made worksheets using French cursive. A la the Zaner Blosser but in this style? Anyone? 

TPT has some for free and some for a small fee.

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