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NCAA Eligibility as an international homeschooler


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My son is keen to do collegiate gymnastics. I have been trying to contact the NCAA but have not got past voice mail for either the international or homeschool teams. I have received emails from the international team but they are very vague and mention "too many uncertainties at this time". The very last email I received referred to the upcoming changes in 2016 and the possibility of more in 2018 and how that made it almost impossible to provide answers with any certainty.  :confused:

 

I have read all the threads which refer to the NCAA but am wondering how much of the advice there will remain true after the  upcoming changes and how do you plan high school when any changes are seemingly retroactive.

 

Yesterday I came across the school code for PHAA and when I entered it in the NCAA Eligibility High School Portal it came up with that PHAA has withdrawn from the approval process and no approved courses were listed. I was thinking that my son could do as many of his core credits as APs as was feasible.

 

I am dumbstruck by the NCAA's attitude towards AP exam results in that they do not take results as proof of learning.

 

I really am at a loss as to what to do. Do I just carry on and plan a rigorous course and keep good documentation and hope for the best? It even seems that homeschoolers that want to compete at college might be forced to enroll in big virtual schools such as K12's Icademy and the new Calvert program as they will have the resources and financial interest in maintaining their eligibility. I am aware that some K12 public virtual schools recently lost their eligibility.

 

I have even explored using NAHRS but they themselves are uncertain if they are NCAA approved and if the NCAA would accept a transcript from them.

 

I wonder if HSLDA has a position on this and if there has been a test case.

 

Of course there is the added complexity that I am an international homeschooler. I did get through to a person at the NCAA once (not with the homeschool or international department though) and when I asked him which team I should speak to he asked for my son's NCAA number and then in a very surprised voice said "Oh you're both, international and a homeschooler!" Not even he was sure what to do then.  :rolleyes:

 

I know of one other local homeschooler that has successfully received NCAA approval but he has just finished his 4-year degree and applied under previous eligibility regulations.

 

We do not have a body that oversees homeschoolers and there is definitely no local organization that offers diplomas. In order to homeschool you need to apply for an exemption from attending school (which is quite a rigorous process) from the Ministry of Education and then sign a 6 monthly affidavit witnessed by a Justice of the Peace that you are continuing to homeschool. There is a national qualification NCEA which homeschoolers can sit the subject exams for but it is not a very well respected qualification and would require us to do school at home. Other homeschoolers are sitting Cambridge exams but they are not very homeschooler-friendly.

 

I would really appreciate any advice from others that are just beginning to navigate high school and the NCAA eligibility process.

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Is this for a fall sport? It used to be that eligibility rules would limit a student from both play and practice. The last time I looked, a student who hadn't been cleared could practice but not play until the first semester grades were in, demonstrating ability to study at the college level.  I don't know if that is still the case.

 

I had to finally come to the decision that of the three things my oldest hoped for (post graduation career, major, and sport) the sport was the most chancy. Not only are there few scholarships and few team spots in swimming, but it is quite competitive and he just isn't really at the level that gets recruited. I decided that with the reality that he was on the low end of being a likely recruit it wasn't worth our sacrificing quality academics for the possibility that NCAA would not object. Not when all of my best laid plans could end up voided by NCAA changing their mind in the semester before graduation. They don't seem compelled to honor good faith efforts to comply with previous requirements.

 

I know that doesn't really help you answer your question. I share your frustration.

 

It might be a situation where doing a year at college red-shirted could be an answer (by which I mean spending a year at college without competing in order to prove academic preparation and not use up a year of eligibility).

 

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Do I just carry on and plan a rigorous course and keep good documentation and hope for the best?

 

I would do this.

 

Here is my 2c.  I have had a good experience with the NCAA.  I think that if you complete a rigorous high school education, keep good documentation, score well on the ACT/SAT, and try to plan some classes through an outside recognized source, you will be fine.  For outside recognized sources, ask the NCAA if they can suggest options for you.  Potter's School may be one.  Landry Academy may be one.

 

We had 3 private outside classes approved by the NCAA:

Laurel Tree Tutorials for 10th grade HS Composition

Derek Owens for 9th grade Physics

History at our House for 9th grade American History (though I wouldn't recommend HaoH unless things have changed from #13 in this thread)

 

We also had plenty of CC classes, a few PS classes, a few more outside classes, a few classes at home, and very respectable ACT scores.

 

I am no expert, but here is my opinion.  I hope I am not being offensive or undiplomatic.  Gymnastics is not a sport that provides huge scholarships.  Woohoo!  Just showed my ignorance.  I don't imagine that there are many students that are being homeschooled in order to sneak low academic standards past the NCAA for gymnastics. Take comfort in that idea.  :D

 

Finally, for a while, I seriously considered Clonlara.  It was my understanding at the time that since they had a brick-and-mortar school that they would be viewed with less scrutiny than a homeschooler.  Looking them up on the NCAA site, though, I see that it says that they are considered a homeschool, so I don't know if there would be any advantage to spending the $$$$ for them or not.  You may want to consider contacting them and chatting.  Or not.

 

Good luck!  Please PM me with your email address if you would like to see NCAA core course worksheets, homeschool administrator statements, transcript.  I'm happy to share.

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  • 7 months later...
Guest colbycoltrain

 

Do I just carry on and plan a rigorous course and keep good documentation and hope for the best?

 

 

 

I would do this.

 

Here is my 2c.  I have had a good experience with the NCAA.  I think that if you complete a rigorous high school education, keep good documentation, score well on the ACT/SAT, and try to plan some classes through an outside recognized source, you will be fine.  For outside recognized sources, ask the NCAA if they can suggest options for you.  Potter's School may be one.  Landry Academy may be one.

 

We had 3 private outside classes approved by the NCAA:

Laurel Tree Tutorials for 10th grade HS Composition

Derek Owens for 9th grade Physics

History at our House for 9th grade American History (though I wouldn't recommend HaoH unless things have changed from #13 in this thread)

 

We also had plenty of CC classes, a few PS classes, a few more outside classes, a few classes at home, and very respectable ACT scores.

 

I am no expert, but here is my opinion.  I hope I am not being offensive or undiplomatic.  Gymnastics is not a sport that provides huge scholarships.  Woohoo!  Just showed my ignorance.  I don't imagine that there are many students that are being homeschooled in order to sneak low academic standards past the NCAA for gymnastics. Take comfort in that idea.  :D

 

Finally, for a while, I seriously considered Clonlara.  It was my understanding at the time that since they had a brick-and-mortar school that they would be viewed with less scrutiny than a homeschooler.  Looking them up on the NCAA site, though, I see that it says that they are considered a homeschool, so I don't know if there would be any advantage to spending the $$$$ for them or not.  You may want to consider contacting them and chatting.  Or not.

 

Good luck!  Please PM me with your email address if you would like to see NCAA core course worksheets, homeschool administrator statements, transcript.  I'm happy to share.

Sue is there a way for me to get your email address as source for awesome information? My daughter is a freshman and we homeschool her. She is already drawing heavy interest from D1 schools for softball. Thanks for your consideration!

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