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So... I just heard from a neighbor who teaches in public school, that people are pushing for full day pre-k? And our kids have to be able to write a full sentence in pre-k, and know how to add and subtract as well? Does anyone besides me remember doing that when we were in 3rd grade?

 

And which generation is supposedly the less intelligent compared to the rest that people have decided that we should be putting kids behind a desk by age 3, 4, to fix the least well educated levels? Who knows what else they want our kids to "learn" at an inappropriate age? I feel like the public school kids in our nation could so easily be indoctrinated at a young age. 

 

I was all for starting my kids early, until I found out how much kids need time and space to develop mentally, and have the physical coordination for certain tasks and what not. I know that some kids are very bright, but when do they get to be kids and just enjoy getting their shoes dirty a bit? Yes, they are assigning homework for them as well. 

 

I used to think my kids had a public school as an option how about you?

 

 

 

 

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I feel they are trying to force people to hold their kids back longer before they send them to school.  That's the only way they can expect many kids in pre-K to be able to do those things without an abusive level of "preparation."

 

And I am far from being a "later is better" parent.

 

However, I would ask whether those are things they give kids the "opportunity to try," or things they actually expect the majority to do successfully.  I have nothing against giving them an intro (with manipulatives / stories) and a pencil and letting them go at it, as long as there is no pressure on the kids or the parents.

 

I think full-day pre-K is a convenience for working parents (or parents who want to be working so they can help support the family).  For a career mom, part-time pre-school just isn't practical.  So the trend toward full-day pre-K (which is not mandatory) does not disturb me at all.  There are still options for families who want to keep their kids home part-time or full-time at that age.

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To the OP, so does your state have universal mandatory pre-k then? I know our state was moving towards universal, but not mandatory, pre-K, but the economic crash of 08 stopped that. Some schools do have full day pre-k for the 3s and 4s, but they are all kids who are high risk. It is mostly for kids who have been receiving lots of EI services or have a diagnosis. They have speech therapists and OTs integrated into the classroom.

 

Most 3 and 4 year olds are in full time daycare/full time pre-school. I  know my niece was getting reading and math instruction at 3 and 4 at her full time montessori preschool. It isn't that unusual around here in the more desirable places. She was flat out reading at 4, could write a complete sentence if you consider that a complete sentence can be two or three short words, and could demonstrate simple addition and subtraction with manipulatives. The writing and math didn't seem beyond what many kids her age could master given the opportunity.

 

But standards like 'write a full sentence' won't matter much to the larger population if the pre-k isn't mandatory and universal.

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I think it's 1/2 day not mandatory for economically challenged students. But I think some  are trying for mandatory full day. My neighbor said that the littles are tired from just half day. But full day plus homework is a bit much imo. 

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We already have full day, all week PreK here in middle GA. There's no way DS was ready. Glad I didn't force him. It's not technically mandatory, but a friend of mine didn't do PreK for her son, then put him in K and he was "behind" all year.

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what they are pushing for is taxpayer subsidized (re:free) daycare.

 

 

Yep.  You should have heard the people here screaming about snow days and what were they expected to do with their kids since they had to work.  I feel for them, but at the same time if the back roads are icy the busses have no business on them.   

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In 3rd grade we were learning multiplication.

 

My son learned addition and subtraction last year (in K). Maybe sentences by the end of the year? Definitely working on them more this year.

i'm trying to remember if he could add and subtract before he entered K. Can't remember exactly.

 

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I can't understand sending 3 or 4 year olds to school for a full day! That sounds crazy to me and forcing academics on a young child is certainly not going to produce students who love to learn.

High quality preschool versus cheapest possible daycare is not a bad thing. I know it would be a real gift to many parents who struggle financially.... But as far as I know only one state offers free full day preschool regardless of need : Oklahoma.

 

 

I have never heard of any preschool with the academic requirements the OP listed and honestly it sounds like fear mongering to me. My state (MA) has very high academic standards and the schools tend to be competitive . No one is expected to do anything beyond letter formation, basic patterns and other fundamental skills in public preschools here.

 

In my town neither half day preschool nor full day kindergarten is free.

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How long do you think it'll be before people are dropping their babies off at the local school on the way home from the maternity ward?  A local school just went to full day, free K and all the parents are thrilled about their "free" daycare.  They even admit that it's more about not having daycare expenses than about better education for the children.

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Regarding homework - I'd want to know what exactly they are talking about.  It might be as simple as "look around the house for things that start with the sound "b."

 

When my kids were in preschool, sometimes they had "homework."  For a little while the 3yo teacher was sending home worksheets (tracing, coloring), but that stopped when parents complained.  I initially balked and told her that I don't plan to do preschool homework, but I'd give my kids the sheets and turn in whatever they came up with (if anything).  The teacher said that was fine, she was only wanting to let parents know what they were working on in school.  Not sure why she didn't think a brief note would do the trick.  Anyhoo, no damage done, because none of the parents was willing to force their 3yo to do worksheets after a long day.

 

One of the preschool teachers assigned for "homework" the gathering of little items to help illustrate the concepts of the week.  For example, one week they would be studying the number 7, the letter G, and the color purple.  So the assignment would be to bring in a baggie containing 7 of something (Lego blocks?), something purple (a purple barrette?) and something beginning with G (a toy giraffe?).  They would use those items as manipulatives all week to practice the concepts.  It was a pain in the butt to find stuff sometimes, but it didn't fry any kids' brains.

 

My kids skipped into KG early and they did do homework, which was not a big deal for them.  I think at that age it is OK to send home some "home work" as long as it is optional.  Some kids like that kind of thing, and some kids do benefit from it IMO.  But forcing it on all kids at that age would be wrong.

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High quality preschool versus cheapest possible daycare is not a bad thing. I know it would be a real gift to many parents who struggle financially.... But as far as I know only one state offers free full day preschool regardless of need : Oklahoma.

 

 

I have never heard of any preschool with the academic requirements the OP listed and honestly it sounds like fear mongering to me. My state (MA) has very high academic standards and the schools tend to be competitive . No one is expected to do anything beyond letter formation, basic patterns and other fundamental skills in public preschools here.

 

In my town neither half day preschool nor full day kindergarten is free.

 

Are you talking about Head Start?  It is need based.  90% of the families must be from low income families.  10% can be from families above the poverty line, but preference is given to the children of lower income families.

 

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My opposition to full day, 5 days a week public pre-K here was a large factor in my initial decision to homeschool.  My state's pathetic high school graduation rate (67% at last report), even with universal pre-K, is one factor that keeps me homeschooling!

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We have full day kindergarten here in ontario, intake age is 3 for JK. I don't think there even are half day options available anymore, I know at first it was optional but most parents ended up changing to full day likely due to pressure that their little one was not doing as well as his full day peers because he's missing too much. There's a lot of pressure that your child will be behind and you'll do them a disservice if you don't send them to JK as well as SK.

 

It's free daycare. IMO kids that age are still partly babies, they need hours of play time, outdoor time, lots of getting dirty, stories while sitting in the lap of somebody who loves them, painting, and naps! I can't imagine my sweet 5 year old gone that long every day, I'd never see him- and I'd be getting his grumpy leftovers at the end of an over stimulating day, every day. :( They say that Jk will propel the children to better academic scores down the road, but evidence is showing that the advantages level out within just a few years at most. In fact, it actually shows that the only ones advantaged by the full day program are the at risk kids, low risk kids (which make up the vast majority of kids in Canadian schools) and especially special needs kids actually fared worse!

http://www.macleans.ca/general/why-full-day-kindergarten-is-failing-our-children/

http://www.imfcanada.org/issues/full-day-kindergarten-ontario-fine-print

http://m.huffpost.com/ca/entry/3988019/

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My kids are in public school. Three of them attended half-day preschool and full-day kindergarten. What you describe in your post is not what school looks like around here.

 

No one here is sticking kids behind desks at three and four. There are tables for seated work, but most the day is not spent there. There is no homework in pre-k. In fact, at our current school, there is no homework in second grade either, other than 40 minutes a week on a phonics drilling program. And my second grader says he only spends half the day at his table even now.

 

There is nap time in K and for those kids who stay for full-day preK.

 

From K through 3rd grade, the kids spend one morning a week doing nature studies in the town forest.

 

Full-day K means the kids can have music class and PE and studio art and French without having their day feel rushed. The academics feel very gentle and relaxed, and my son's K teacher was great about following student interests. For example, when my son became obsessed with Machu Pichu, she arranged for the class to Skype with someone who had traveled there recently.

 

I absolutely understand why a parent might not want full-day school for young kids, and I know areas are different, but the reality might be different than you think.

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Are you talking about Head Start?  It is need based.  90% of the families must be from low income families.  10% can be from families above the poverty line, but preference is given to the children of lower income families.

 

 

No, Oklahoma has free public pre-k for all.  It is voluntary but very very popular.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2013/02/14/is-oklahoma-the-right-model-for-universal-pre-k/

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Homework for 3 and 4 year olds? Full time school five days a week? Seriously? Those kids need to be playing, learning songs, listening to books read aloud, and spending time outside. Let them be little kids.

 

That is exactly what the public preschool is in my town.  Circle time, play time, music, art, story time, library visits, recess.  Here it's just 2.5 hours, which I do think is better, if you're able to have a parent home full time. 

 

I do NOT send my kids to the public preschool, but I volunteer at the same building (my daughter is in public K) and I've seen firsthand how non-horrible the preschool is.

 

Even my daughter's kidnergarten has daily nap, daily recess, daily playtime ('choice time') and only about 2 hours of academics in a six-hour day.

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Hmm.. all 3 of my children did all-day pre-K. They loved going to school. They had great teachers and the classroom environment was fun. I think we shouldn't discount the number of kids who do well in school. I don't think a blanket statement should brush every 4 year old child.

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I can also say that even my 2nd graders spend probably half of their school day (if not more) away from their desks, including 2 outdoor recesses and lots of other changes of scene.  And up through KG, they had a nice long nap every day.  I know it varies, but I don't think the existence of full-day pre-K means they are making 4yos sit like 4th graders all day.  But for parents who feel they can do better by their child at home, that remains an option.  If only at-risk kids benefit, then don't send your not-at-risk child.

 

I think that even if I were a SAHM, I would have sent my kids to some pre-K program, because they needed to get comfortable with talking outside of the house.  It wasn't about academics - that I could easily take care of at home.  There are lots of reasons besides academics that people want their kids in a group setting.  It does not bother me if we pay for it out of tax dollars, as long as the program is well-designed for the age group and does not exclude anyone.

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New York City is starting free pre K, full day or half day. Extremely popular.

 

They are not doing this to put kids behind a desk, but to give kids advantages they might not otherwise get. In many cases both parents need to work just to get by. Single working parent. Parents with serious health problems or addiction. Parents who do not have education or inclination to help their kids. Not to mention more economically stable households that are looking for something other than daycare.

 

The idea is that ALL kids can have access to positive experiences in preschool years. Year after year, there are significant achievement gaps among students from different backgrounds. Good preschools that help the whole child may help to narrow those gaps.

 

Maybe if all kids had WTM parents, there would be no demand for preschool....

 

As an aside, one reason some parents sent their kids to school in a blizzard last year in NYC was the free breakfast and lunch. Preschool can be a safe haven.

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What irks me is the perpetuation of the belief that one prepares for K by doing K level work.

 

There is so much that comes before. Parents can do all of the prep needed just by living with their little person--read aloud, do chores together, go (anywhere), talk together, play with puzzles/balls/playdough, etc.

 

Schools have shrouded K Prep in mystery and sold parents a bill of goods that is detrimental to their confidence in parenting.

 

It pisses me off, very frankly.

 

If parents could be supported in providing a developmentally appropriate home environment, the only reason for universal PreK would be "free" childcare.

 

I say that as a person with a degree in Early and Middle Ed, and 12 years of preschool teaching.

FWIW.

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New York City is starting free pre K, full day or half day. Extremely popular.

 

They are not doing this to put kids behind a desk, but to give kids advantages they might not otherwise get. In many cases both parents need to work just to get by. Single working parent. Parents with serious health problems or addiction. Parents who do not have education or inclination to help their kids. Not to mention more economically stable households that are looking for something other than daycare.

 

The idea is that ALL kids can have access to positive experiences in preschool years. Year after year, there are sign icanj achievement gaps among students from different backgrounds. Good preschools that help the whole child may help to narrow those gaps.

 

I do agree with the above.

 

I would say the education of those offering daycare needs to be improved. Whether you call it daycare or full-day preschool, it needs to be developmentally appropriate. SO MANY AREN'T. Both public preschool and private/home-based care need to discard the "school" mentality and start embracing something else. That starts, IMO, with teacher preparation programs, pre-parenting education, and licensing requirements that insist upon standards that are DP.

 

Aaand I'm done ranting. Sorry.

 

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I do agree with the above.

 

I would say the education of those offering daycare needs to be improved. Whether you call it daycare or full-day preschool, it needs to be developmentally appropriate. SO MANY AREN'T. Both public preschool and private/home-based care need to discard the "school" mentality and start embracing something else. That starts, IMO, with teacher preparation programs, pre-parenting education, and licensing requirements that insist upon standards that are DP.

 

Aaand I'm done ranting. Sorry.

 

Chris, thank you.

 

My kids went to one of the few developmentally appropriate preschool in our competitive area. Wonderful experience, free play, nature activities, stories, healthy snacks served on real plates, with kids waiting till everybody was served and seated. No letters or numbers, but plenty of activities that developed phonemic awareness and number sense. Oh, and no Disney.

 

Eta One other good preschool in our area had parents commenting on how many clothes they had to buy, because it was impossible to get the mud out, lol.

 

Sadly those two schools were the exception. One school brags about how their preschoolers know the planets in the solar system,

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There is not really universal pre-k in Oklahoma. Parent's camp outside the schools that have it in our district in order to get one of the available slots after taking all the low income students first. Each school handles it different. One makes parents wait across the street until they open their doors and then they race to line up. It is ridiculous! They may be moving towards universal, but it is far from it.

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Sadly those two schools were the exception. One school brags about how their preschoolers know the planets in the solar system,

 

My kids' preschool's website would make you think they chained wee tots to the floor and drilled them all day.  The stuff they advertised that kids were learning included:  Spanish, French, instrumental music, world geography, author studies, artist studies, composer studies, science, karate, yoga, dance, plus all the usual preschool academics.  And it was all true - they worked those countries, authors, animals and artists into circle time / story time, and they had outside experts come in weekly to teach music, languages, and sports.  Like most preschools, they had sensory tables and stuff like that to teach certain science and math concepts.  They also went outside 2x per day in all kinds of weather etc.  There was no pressure to learn, no testing, nobody getting kicked out or retained for not knowing their world geography or their phonics.  At the end of pre-K, you could say that all the kids were exposed to all sorts of wonderful things.  But if my kids are any indication, they would not remember many details.  What they did understand was that the world is big and diverse and interesting, and that people have many kinds of interests and abilities.

 

I say this because you can't really tell much from what a preschool advertises.  Just because kids are exposed to something does not mean they are required to learn and recite it "or else."

 

As for the planets in the solar system, my kids knew those when they were 2 or 3, because I used to say them while flossing their teeth.  Of course I included Pluto, since I needed all 9 planets, but hopefully I will be forgiven for that.  :P

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We have full day kindergarten here in ontario, intake age is 3 for JK. I don't think there even are half day options available anymore, I know at first it was optional but most parents ended up changing to full day likely due to pressure that their little one was not doing as well as his full day peers because he's missing too much. There's a lot of pressure that your child will be behind and you'll do them a disservice if you don't send them to JK as well as SK.

 

It's free daycare. IMO kids that age are still partly babies, they need hours of play time, outdoor time, lots of getting dirty, stories while sitting in the lap of somebody who loves them, painting, and naps! I can't imagine my sweet 5 year old gone that long every day, I'd never see him- and I'd be getting his grumpy leftovers at the end of an over stimulating day, every day. :( They say that Jk will propel the children to better academic scores down the road, but evidence is showing that the advantages level out within just a few years at most. In fact, it actually shows that the only ones advantaged by the full day program are the at risk kids, low risk kids (which make up the vast majority of kids in Canadian schools) and especially special needs kids actually fared worse!

http://www.macleans.ca/general/why-full-day-kindergarten-is-failing-our-children/

http://www.imfcanada.org/issues/full-day-kindergarten-ontario-fine-print

http://m.huffpost.com/ca/entry/3988019/

I'm in Ontario and was going to say this also.

 

My daughter went into Junior Kindie when she was just a few weeks past her 4th bday. There was a little 3 yr old in her class who just seemed so tiny when I would see her. My oldest was close to 5 when he entered JK.

 

Although, in my experience anyway, the academics aren't as heavy in our JK. It's mostly play-based in JK/SK and nothing at all like what the OP described.

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There is not really universal pre-k in Oklahoma. Parent's camp outside the schools that have it in our district in order to get one of the available slots after taking all the low income students first. Each school handles it different. One makes parents wait across the street until they open their doors and then they race to line up. It is ridiculous! They may be moving towards universal, but it is far from it.

 

The state provides the funding. However, it is up to the district to implement the program to receive the funding. Some districts are way ahead of others in implementation. Eventually, it will probably be completely universal as the districts want the funding and the more students, the more funding. The district I grew up in now has free pre K for any child.

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 In fact, it actually shows that the only ones advantaged by the full day program are the at risk kids, low risk kids (which make up the vast majority of kids in Canadian schools) and especially special needs kids actually fared worse!

 

Well, I'm just going to say it.  The advantage of tax payer funded, full day preschool is that moms can then get out in the workforce earlier and generate tax dollars for the government.

 

And yes, that's what I think it's mostly about; not so much on a local level, but more so on state level, and a priority at federal level.

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Well, I'm just going to say it. The advantage of tax payer funded, full day preschool is that moms can then get out in the workforce earlier and generate tax dollars for the government.

 

And yes, that's what I think it's mostly about; not so much on a local level, but more so on state level, and a priority at federal level.

This is why I put my kids in our public school here in Ontario. Free all day daycare, and since I was a single mom I really liked having this option. As soon as I started working from home and no longer needed them in school in order to survive, we pulled them. That was largely the ONLY benefit to early full day Kindie for us, amongst a sea of negatives.

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So... I just heard from a neighbor who teaches in public school, that people are pushing for full day pre-k? And our kids have to be able to write a full sentence in pre-k, and know how to add and subtract as well? Does anyone besides me remember doing that when we were in 3rd grade?

 

And which generation is supposedly the less intelligent compared to the rest that people have decided that we should be putting kids behind a desk by age 3, 4, to fix the least well educated levels? Who knows what else they want our kids to "learn" at an inappropriate age? I feel like the public school kids in our nation could so easily be indoctrinated at a young age. 

 

I was all for starting my kids early, until I found out how much kids need time and space to develop mentally, and have the physical coordination for certain tasks and what not. I know that some kids are very bright, but when do they get to be kids and just enjoy getting their shoes dirty a bit? Yes, they are assigning homework for them as well. 

 

I used to think my kids had a public school as an option how about you?

 

We've had full day pre-k here for as long as I've lived here at least - so 12 years.  At the public school and the private ones.

As far as the writing a sentence and adding and subtracting...uh, no.  Here they learn their letters and numbers and do pre-reading stuff.  I remember adding and subtracting before 3rd grade (and writing sentences lol) but pre-k sounds pretty early for that.  

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I was trying to quote the post that said it was available to all kids. It simply is not true. Yes, funding may be there to an extent, but our neighborhood school did not have space for preK. The funding was not enough to build new facilities. The funding does not help add classroom space. The state may claim universal preK, but it is not true in implementation. Most of the programs I know of are half day, not full day.

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This is why I put my kids in our public school here in Ontario. Free all day daycare, and since I was a single mom I really liked having this option. As soon as I started working from home and no longer needed them in school in order to survive, we pulled them. That was largely the ONLY benefit to early full day Kindie for us, amongst a sea of negatives.

 

Oh, I am sorry, I am afraid my post may have come across differently than I meant!  On a local level, there are a lot of reasons that programs benefit families and children, and they are very worthwhile.  Of course, particularly for a single parent, this could make all of the difference in providing for your family.  I do totally get that.

 

My response was reflective of the comments about universal preschool, that the advantage for the government to provide it has to do with generating money.

 

I should have been clearer in my original comment. Please forgive me if I inadvertently offended?

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Oh, I am sorry, I am afraid my post may have come across differently than I meant! On a local level, there are a lot of reasons that programs benefit families and children, and they are very worthwhile. Of course, particularly for a single parent, this could make all of the difference in providing for your family. I do totally get that.

 

My response was reflective of the comments about universal preschool, that the advantage for the government to provide it has to do with generating money.

 

I should have been clearer in my original comment. Please forgive me if I inadvertently offended?

No offense at all :)

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I know this board is disproportionally SAHM and distrustful of public schools, but still, some of the comments on this thread reek of mommy war judgmentalism to me.

 

I think pre-k is not universally necessary, but it's valuable for some kids. Especially when done well.

Given that, I think having a public education option for kids before kindergarten age is reasonable.

It is also a subsidized substitute daycare to an extend, but, so is all elementary-level education.

 

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What irks me is the perpetuation of the belief that one prepares for K by doing K level work.

 

There is so much that comes before. Parents can do all of the prep needed just by living with their little person--read aloud, do chores together, go (anywhere), talk together, play with puzzles/balls/playdough, etc.

 

The problem is that in many families, these things don't happen.  It is well known that there is a *huge* difference in vocabulary, skills, and general readiness for K among children.  Universal pre-K is supposed to bolster readiness in kids who don't have the support you're talking about in the home.

 

That said, there are other models for dealing with the readiness issue.  Some countries have special transitional classes for kids who aren't ready for academic work.  The idea is that with intensive remediation, they can get the kids up to the level they need to be for placement in the general ed population the next year.

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Well, I'm just going to say it.  The advantage of tax payer funded, full day preschool is that moms can then get out in the workforce earlier and generate tax dollars for the government.

 

And yes, that's what I think it's mostly about; not so much on a local level, but more so on state level, and a priority at federal level.

 

Or mom can get back to the job that she has been studying and training for, that gives her a lot of personal satisfaction, that allows her to feel happy.  Or the job that supports the family.  Or the job that allows the husband to follow his lower-paying passion.  Or the job that...

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Homework for 3 and 4 year olds? Full time school five days a week? Seriously? Those kids need to be playing, learning songs, listening to books read aloud, and spending time outside. Let them be little kids.

This is probably what they'll spend most of the day doing. But it will be paid for by the taxpayer rather than the parents.

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I don't have a problem with that.

I really don't want them making it totally academic though.

I have mixed feelings about it, but my limited exposure to preschool stuff has led me to believe that the schools list academic standards, because that's what parents want to hear. Most parents I know love being able to list all the academic things their kid's preschool is teaching them. But in reality, how can you possibly do that stuff ALL DAY with a bunch if 3- and 4-year-olds? So I think there is still a good amount of playing. I'm not a fan of full day preschool, but I just don't think it is what the schools want us to think it is.

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The problem with public funding is that they didn't raise more taxes to pay for it...they took it out of the existing budget. In my district, that means more crowding in the honors courses and PE and less transportation for nonsped. Students are walking a mile down a county road to get to their bus stops now...in 5F weather in the dark in winter. It will go to two miles with the next round of unfunded mandates.

Well, in NYC, the plan is to raise taxes on the wealthiest residents. Since luxury apartments routinely sell for $5 million, $10 million, go up to $50 million and more .... Seems fair to me. NYC has many incredibly rich residents.

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Or mom can get back to the job that she has been studying and training for, that gives her a lot of personal satisfaction, that allows her to feel happy. Or the job that supports the family. Or the job that allows the husband to follow his lower-paying passion. Or the job that...

This too. My earlier post was mainly about kids facing the effects of poverty, so I am glad Cammie made this point.

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DS1 attended public funded full day preK when we lived in Brooklyn and loved it.  It was typically reserved for kids who didn't speak English at home, although DS got in because they wanted a native speaker.  It was a wonderful classroom.  I had two babies and was grateful for the break to be honest.  Big bright airy (old school).  Their own bathrooms attached to the room.  The kids ate lunch in their classroom and were kind of separated from the older kids.  It was not full day academics.  It was lots of free play, art, music, story time, etc.  The goal was to have them familiar with the alphabet (but not know it perfectly) as well as counting to 10 by the end.  There was not a lot of emphasis on writing, etc.  They waited until Kindergarten.

 

Most VPK programs here in FL are 2-1/2 hours/day.  They are jam packed with worksheets, etc.  I honestly think that the full day program was far gentler. DS2 attended a public montessori  PK4 and loved it.  Wasn't a full day…but went until 1 p.m.   It was a mixed classroom, PK3, PK4, and K.   The Kindy students were the only ones from 1-3 p.m. 

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And I hate to say it, but in some cases the meal(s) the kids get at the school might be their best that day. Every family situation is different. Some families probably really rely on the free or reduced priced meals.

 

True.

 

I am near NYC, so I have that perspective, and what you say is absolutely right. Lunches are handed out during the summer too, at playgrounds, libraries, etc. I presume they have some system of ensuring they go to those who need them. Maybe breakfast too, I am not sure.

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DS1 attended public funded full day preK when we lived in Brooklyn and loved it.  It was typically reserved for kids who didn't speak English at home, although DS got in because they wanted a native speaker.  It was a wonderful classroom.  I had two babies and was grateful for the break to be honest.  Big bright airy (old school).  Their own bathrooms attached to the room.  The kids ate lunch in their classroom and were kind of separated from the older kids.  It was not full day academics.  It was lots of free play, art, music, story time, etc.  The goal was to have them familiar with the alphabet (but not know it perfectly) as well as counting to 10 by the end.  There was not a lot of emphasis on writing, etc.  They waited until Kindergarten.

 

Most VPK programs here in FL are 2-1/2 hours/day.  They are jam packed with worksheets, etc.  I honestly think that the full day program was far gentler. DS2 attended a public montessori  PK4 and loved it.  Wasn't a full day…but went until 1 p.m.   It was a mixed classroom, PK3, PK4, and K.   The Kindy students were the only ones from 1-3 p.m. 

 

 

The Brooklyn program sounds lovely.

 

Sorry about Florida. :-(

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