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You know you're the parent of an only child when...


Rebecca in KY
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Your 6.5 yr old son has a bit of trouble getting his arm through his armhole, and not one, but BOTH parents swoop in to help him. Hubby opened up the armhole and I helped him feed his arm through it. Ha! We looked at each other over DS's head and laughed.

 

...Oh, and one more. I hadn't added unloading the dishwasher to DS's chores because I was afraid he wasn't tall enough or would break dishes. Talked to my sister last week, who said, "Meh, my DD4 does it...I have a stepladder in the kitchen and she does just fine!" Guess who learned to unload the dishwasher this week!?!

 

Anybody else?

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Well I don't have an only child but you can tell who the baby is in my family. The child who has almost reached 5 and cannot dress himself, put on his own shoes, sleep in his own bed, wipe his own butt and was allowed to keep his paci and bottle till he was almost 3 and still puts his arms up for me to carry him around ( he's tiny and light). He can't hold a pencil or draw a picture that isn't scribble or read. My other two could do all those things by the time they were 5 and gave up their paci's and bottles by 18 months.

 

Whoops LOL

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Not that long ago my dd4 was interrupting our conversation with a loud, repetitive, and insistent 'excuse ME!' For every small reason.

 

We explained that it was polite to wait for a lull in the conversation unless it was really, really important, and finally in exasperation her daddy explained that life isn't always just about her.

 

She turned and looked at him and replied " but daddy, it really IS just about me!"

 

Uh...

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I have two kids and most of this is true for my youngest . . . especially the long-standing imaginary friends with worlds of their own and elaborate subplots. Around age 11 I explained that he needed to write his stories down because then he'd be a writer and not a nut job.

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Not that long ago my dd4 was interrupting our conversation with a loud, repetitive, and insistent 'excuse ME!' For every small reason.

 

We explained that it was polite to wait for a lull in the conversation unless it was really, really important, and finally in exasperation her daddy explained that life isn't always just about her.

 

She turned and looked at him and replied " but daddy, it really IS just about me!"

 

Uh...

 

 

I have two kids and most of this is true for my youngest . . . especially the long-standing imaginary friends with worlds of their own and elaborate subplots. Around age 11 I explained that he needed to write his stories down because then he'd be a writer and not a nut job.

 

 

:lol:  Too cute!

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You know you homeschool an only when you have long standing imaginary students, complete with back stories, relatives and outside interests.

Mine are stuffed animals. With labeled school box desks. And books DD prints out on my laser printer and assembles. (math mammoth works great for this purpose, by the way) . Does that count?

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I'm an only and the mother of an only. Because of my own "onliness" I think I tend to be less cosseting of DS13. That and the fact that DH is the eldest of 3, so he thinks that we shouldn't be too soft on DS (and you know how bossy eldest children are!).

 

I know I'm the parent of an only because I am the one who always has spare seats in the car and can thus transport everyone else's unruly kids; I never, ever get second child or family discounts; I am frequently called on to babysit other people's kids because my child "must be lonely" (he's usually not - onlies are good at making friends, good at amusing themselves, and generally happy with our own company); and I have a massive collection of curriculum materials in pristine condition because there is too much good stuff and not enough kids to experiment on!

D

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My daughter was an only child. Even if she was one of six, I wouldn't have had her unloading the dishwasher at age 4. That is definitely not age appropriate.

Maybe not unloading the entire thing, but I don't think four is too young to make a good go at most of it. My newly turned three and five year olds empty about 75% of the dishwasher every morning. I take care of the heavy ceramic plates and the glasses that are stored in the upper cupboard and they take care of the rest.

 

Wendy

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Too heavy for a 4yr old items + glasses would be over 75% of my dishes :laugh: Light weight items would include silverware or things like giant serving spoons.

Yeah, it only works at our house because I have set them up for success. The kids and I use small Correlle plates for breakfast and lunch and I keep those plates in a lower cupboard so the kids can put them away and set the table independently. They put away all the silverware including cooking utensils. They put away the cookie sheets and mixing bowls and pots and pans which all live in the lower cabinets.

 

Of course, I don't just leave them to it. While they work I am making breakfast and putting away my 25% of the dishes, so I am able to guide and supervise. It works well for us.

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Your 6.5 yr old son has a bit of trouble getting his arm through his armhole, and not one, but BOTH parents swoop in to help him. Hubby opened up the armhole and I helped him feed his arm through it. Ha! We looked at each other over DS's head and laughed.

 

 

Anybody else?

 

Wait a minute----your kid is six and he already dresses himself?

 

j/k....sort of.....ds can dress himself if we're in a hurry and quite easily if he's wearing handmade clothing without all the hardware and age-inappropriate fasteners that is so fashionable these days.

 

You know you're the parent of an only child when you make all his clothes until he's four.

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My daughter was an only child.  Even if she was one of six, I wouldn't have had her unloading the dishwasher at age 4.  That is definitely not age appropriate.

 

Hmmmm......  interesting......  all of my children (not only children)  started unloading the dishwasher at age 3.  They may not be able to put away everything, but we had a very kid-friendly house, where most of the dishes and cups went in the lower cabinets.  One of the best things we ever did.  

 

Try not to be so critical.  It worked out great for us.  

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Now I'm starting to wonder if perhaps I'm too hard on my kidlets. My kids unloaded the cutlery part of the dishwasher at 3. By 4 they had a stool and would do the cups and cutlery. By 6 they were doing the whole thing with their little stool (and me supervising of course). My youngest washes bathroom sinks, sweeps and washes his own floor, vacuums rugs, and can do his own laundry and make a few different things for lunch. I've let him fight with his clothes for a long time before helping him out. When he was learning to tie his shoes I would give him an extra 20 min just to fight with the laces.

 

I guess I'm kinda a mean mommy. Maybe I need to lighten up on the kids a little.

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Now I'm starting to wonder if perhaps I'm too hard on my kidlets. My kids unloaded the cutlery part of the dishwasher at 3. By 4 they had a stool and would do the cups and cutlery. By 6 they were doing the whole thing with their little stool (and me supervising of course). My youngest washes bathroom sinks, sweeps and washes his own floor, vacuums rugs, and can do his own laundry and make a few different things for lunch. I've let him fight with his clothes for a long time before helping him out. When he was learning to tie his shoes I would give him an extra 20 min just to fight with the laces.

 

I guess I'm kinda a mean mommy. Maybe I need to lighten up on the kids a little.

I don't think you're mean. As soon as my son (an "only" child) could walk, he was responsible for putting his dirty clothes in the hamper. I know by three he washed the window on our storm door with a spray bottle of water. At some point during his preschool years he was adept at using the swiffer. Things just kinda progressed from there. Laundry came in sometime in middle school. Changing light bulbs, setting the table, etc. are all normal things for kids to do. Now, at 17, he's sanding and painting the outdoor furniture. Alas, he still has difficulty tying his shoes, but he still does it on his own!
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Now I'm starting to wonder if perhaps I'm too hard on my kidlets. My kids unloaded the cutlery part of the dishwasher at 3. By 4 they had a stool and would do the cups and cutlery. By 6 they were doing the whole thing with their little stool (and me supervising of course). My youngest washes bathroom sinks, sweeps and washes his own floor, vacuums rugs, and can do his own laundry and make a few different things for lunch. I've let him fight with his clothes for a long time before helping him out. When he was learning to tie his shoes I would give him an extra 20 min just to fight with the laces.

 

I guess I'm kinda a mean mommy. Maybe I need to lighten up on the kids a little.

Ah, see! Not mean at all. You just have to PR it a bit:)

Not chores, per say. People now pay lots of money to send their kids to schools at very young ages to be taught many similar things. You just need to rename them practical life skills, lol.

 

But seriously. I have my only child doing laundry, unloading parts of the dishwasher, cleaning mirrors and windows, vacuuming with the handheld, and sweeping. Pouring her own drinks, getting simple snacks, helping me prepare dinner. And I honestly think we do way too much for her.

 

I was just recently given a checklist from the Montessori preschool she will be attending part time next fall and laughed at the practical life section as it includes so many of those things she does with me...and considers to be fun helping mom, not work!

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My sons unload the dishwasher. My younger son is 5, but he started when he was 4. It's a group activity but I don't see anything inappropriate about it. That's an off assertion. Also, everyone washes off their own color dishes after breakfast and lunch. I can't say that the Fiestaware is too heavy for my 5 year old (4 when we started that system).

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I've seen parents of an only sit in the audience - dad with one camera recording each moment of their dd speaking while mom had a camera for each hand - one for photos and one for video. That is one photographed child!

That is hilarious. DS is an only but I've said for years that we wouldn't have a single picture of him if it wasn't for my MIL. We're awful about remembering a camera.

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That is hilarious. DS is an only but I've said for years that we wouldn't have a single picture of him if it wasn't for my MIL. We're awful about remembering a camera.

I

Us, too! I've been wondering what we are going to put on his senior display board next year at graduation!

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