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Best resource for teaching me to teach ds to revise his writing (mid-elem level)???


jkl
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Ds is 8.  I want to do some creative writing next year to supplement WWE.  I read No More I'm Done, and would love to put a writing workshop/free writing type component in our day.  I love the mini-lessons the author provides, but I need more hand-holding on how to lead a 3rd grader in revising his piece.  I know The Writer's Jungle has a bunch on this, but I can't justify paying that much for 1 book right now.  Anythng else come to mind?  I have a bunch of how-to-teach-writing books on my Amazon wish list, but can't decide what would be best for teaching this part of the writing process....Thanks!

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I'm not sure if this is the correct way of teaching it, but I teach by modeling until they start to take over. We will go over the paper together line by line and I will make corrections and do the editing for them and explain why. They are allowed to challenge me, but they need a persuasive argument to make me relent. Then I hand them back the paper with editing marks and have them rewrite with changes. Rinse and repeat as necessary. After a few times, I ask them to edit their own papers the way I've done it and then I check their editing. We don't use a curriculum for that. I made a checklist to help keep them on track. I think it asks if they have checked for correct spelling, punctuation, and grammar. Then it asks if they have used precise and strong nouns and verbs, eliminated repetitive or rambling sentences, and asked themselves if they have enough details or supporting evidence for any claims. 

 

With my oldest, I found that he thought editing was an imposition and an unnecessary step so if I handed him a paper and told him to edit it, I'd get a half-hearted effort. He'd make a few token changes and say he was done. It worked better if I just did it myself and made him sit through and listen to my thought process and reasoning. 

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Thanks for the reply! ds is a bit touchy about his writing, so I'm afraid that if I did the editing, he'd get upset and start to dislike our writing time. But, maybe the way I could approach it is modeling revising my own writing. Hmmmmm... I'd love a book of mini-lessons about revising/editing. (Edited to say there are plenty of mini-lessons in the book about adding details to writing, etc. I'm just having trouble imagining how to apply it to a piece ds has already written without killing the joy of writing!)

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The thing that's nice about revision in TWJ is that it's really focused on the child's sense of the writing and about supporting the writing in a positive way that won't result in tears.  Also, the BW in me wants to say...  he's just eight.  It's really, really young to be doing any significant revision, especially without a ton of support.  Let him do plenty of writing that you don't revise - real writers don't revise everything.  Some things they stick in a drawer and don't bother with ever again.  And when you do revise, she talks about focusing on one or two things, not a huge list of overwhelming stuff.

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I like the checklist idea. My dd would be ok with us revising together. I was thinking about things such as adding adjectives and other things to make it more interesting. I wanted to keep it simple but I wanted a guide so she can get in the habit of thinking of ways to make improvements - starting small now so we can build on more editing later. So I do like a checklist idea. Are there any other lists out there? I'm thinking along the lines of dress-ups in IEW but less rigid.

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The thing that's nice about revision in TWJ is that it's really focused on the child's sense of the writing and about supporting the writing in a positive way that won't result in tears.  Also, the BW in me wants to say...  he's just eight.  It's really, really young to be doing any significant revision, especially without a ton of support.  Let him do plenty of writing that you don't revise - real writers don't revise everything. 

 

Thanks for this!  Don't worry, I'm not going to go crazy trying to get him to make his writing "better". ( He writes tons of stuff on his own, but does not like to be corrected on anything, ever, so I'm treading lightly!)  Farrar, can you give me an example of how you might approach this with a 3rd grader?  In NMID, the author talks a little about conferencing with the child and adding spiderlegs or arrows to insert any other information the child might decide to add, then an adult types up the final copy, adding those things in.  That sounds fine to me, but the book is mostly focused on 1st and 2nd graders, and I'm unsure if that's "enough" for 3rd grade.

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One thing that seems to help ds is for me to read it aloud. I think hearing the sentence structures make it easier to realize something is wrong or could be better.

 

The checklist has been the most helpful thing about IEW writing. Ds is much more independent with revision than he used to be.

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