Jump to content

Menu

s/o of Barton as complete LA


Recommended Posts

OneStep, you mentioned Barton standing alone, save maybe for some handwriting.  You also mentioned Barton saying *not* to add certain other things.  So how do you do handwriting without it involving any reading or writing?  

 

I don't know, I've had this sort of feeling like we're Shaggy being chased by ghosts, where our feet spin but we don't go forward.  Somehow ds really doesn't SEEM like a K5er.  He's a real oddity.  He has an occasional interest in spelling a useful word (his name for an app, Peter Rabbit to put on a sign at Easter), but beyond that there's just nothing.  There's not even that sense that it would be useful to him or that it's going somewhere.  He loves school as in learning, But I have NO thought that he ought to be writing sentences and drawing pictures sometime soon, any time soon.  I don't even get why that is.  And yet clearly what we do with *content* is connecting with him and engaging.  (Yesterday he was correcting the SLP that a ladybug was a type of beetle... We read that on our bug ID card...)

 

I have no clue what I'm asking, lol.  I'm just saying it's really weird and I haven't quite nailed down why it seems that way.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, with Barton there are writing activities tied directly to the Barton lessons so they do get practice with writing.   And Barton incorporates a lot of writing/reading/spelling etc. in each lesson after Level 1, so it is all being integrated and reinforced.   Each level increases what is expected.  Eventually, there is also verbal summarization of stories and I anticipate that will involve writing at some point, too.  

 

Also, though, on the side, the kids are still doing some copywork to practice cursive so the physical act of building up muscle memory for handwriting and improving penmanship is also being covered through cursive practice.  

 

And  at first anything else they had to do for content output they dictated to me in the beginning and I would write it down for them then read it back to them to confirm that what they dictated to me is what they really wanted to say.  I still do this but not quite as much.

 

 Now that DD is at Level 4 she is writing things relatively independently, in fact.  DS not so much but he still has other issues to deal with that DD just doesn't.  

 

And honestly it is o.k. for them to be writing for fun on their own.  DD started a short story during our early days in Barton.  That's o.k., really, as long as they are o.k. with poor spelling and grammar and it was their idea, something they are motivated to do.  Just don't correct the work unless they ask you to.  Let them just spell as they are able.  And if they ask how to spell something, just spell it for them instead of asking them to sound it out, unless it is a word you know they have mastered the rules for in Barton.

 

I am uncertain if I have answered your question?   :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The actual handwriting in cursive seems to be working well with the Memoria Press materials for my kids.  The New American Cursive font is easier for them to read and easier for DS to form.  His dysgraphia issues are still there but he does much better with this.  He likes the workbook and does a page a day of tracing.  Sometimes his hand gets tired so we use lined dry erase boards for additional practice.  I don't have DD practice.  She just writes in cursive when doing Barton since she likes it.  DS needs to keep strengthening his hand and working on muscle memory and control and he had not yet mastered cursive when he left school so he does handwriting practice every day.

 

The other thing I LOVE with the Memoria Press materials for cursive is the Start Write software that comes with it.  I can print out any word or sentence I want, in any size, in the New American Cursive font, and have it print as a solid, or with lots of dots to trace or with just a few dots to trace, or showing with arrows which direction to go to write it, etc., and it prints it with the guided lines or without the guided lines, etc.  I can customize it to whatever I need for each child, and use it for content study in other subjects.      It has helped  a lot for DS especially.  DD already knew cursive from school so she just sometimes needs the laminated reminder key on formation of letters but she still likes tracing words, too, so she can improve penmanship, etc.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks, I had no clue so much was integrated into Barton.  Now I see why you're saying it's complete!  That's all the stuff we had to figure out on our own with SWR, whew!  

 

Right now I have him build words with foam letters and he traces letters on the magna tab.  He asks to spell his name using the magna tab, so he gets the idea.  He has on occasion asked me to help him write a word.  It's just he's SO flighty.  It's hard to imagine 2 months making a difference and him suddenly sitting down and writing words.  Even his dot to dots are odd.  He'll do them for a bit and then just scrawl and zip.  There's no seriousness to him on this stuff.  I don't know what that means, but it's weird.  There's not even a pull it together, do it for a bit but it's too hard kind of thing.  It's more like who cares, not part of my world...  He's 5.5, will be 6 in October, so he's plenty, fully K5 by then (or now) and he's just totally flighty on it, kwim?  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I talked with dh about it today, and he thinks I'm seeing an attention issue, that he's going to have to be worn out to settle down and focus.  That could explain it.  When he's there, he's really there, but when he's not he's really, really not.  So I guess we'll see if all the swimming and stuff we have him signed up for makes a difference!  I'm also pondering whether I've really missed the boat with how we ought to be working with him and whether this flighty-ness sort of misleads you, since it doesn't match up with what's on the inside.  Dunno.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Technically, Barton is all you are supposed to do. We've ignored that advice and continued with copywork for handwriting after DD mastered the basic ABCs. We avoid invented spelling like the plague, though. If she wants to write something herself she dictates it to me, I write it, and she copies the words, or she can use our computer's speech to text feature so that she can get information out of her head and onto paper without the hindrance of spelling.

 

We also continue to do grammar orally. We started with reading sentences aloud and asking dd to name the nouns and verbs. She can now diagram sentences properly, edit for punctuation, correct improper tense etc. but we do every bit of it orally. No reading, and no writing unless it is strict copying.

 

My girl is a lover of words and stories, and I hated to stifle her passion for writing because of her struggle with spelling. That said, Barton does a great job of building kids up to proper grammar by dividing sentences up into who/did what/add-on phrases when teaching them to read with correct phrasing. They also have kids writing their own phrases and sentences by level 4 (or was it 3?) so it is probably enough on its own, my girl just wanted more.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Plink, I love what you're doing for grammar and writing!!!  How inspiring!!  And yes, my ds has crazy high verbal scores (in the stuff not brought down by his apraxia).  It's a totally screwy thing to work with, because some things are really there.  Like he goes around reciting lines from audiobooks and saying these very verbal things.  But up until a week ago he couldn't tell you how many fingers he had, lol.  Just mind-boggling.  But I love your ideas for pursuing the verbal stuff.  I did grammar with dd at this age.  I think we ds I might go straight into Shurley and skip FLL entirely.  Even with dd our FLL1/2 was really cursory and hack.  With ds, I think he just needs to build collages of the parts of speech then start using the Q&A flow and move forward.  He should be stellar at it.  Yesterday we were talking about adverbs vs. adjectives, so the kid is THERE in his brain.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Technically, Barton is all you are supposed to do. We've ignored that advice and continued with copywork for handwriting after DD mastered the basic ABCs. We avoid invented spelling like the plague, though. If she wants to write something herself she dictates it to me, I write it, and she copies the words, or she can use our computer's speech to text feature so that she can get information out of her head and onto paper without the hindrance of spelling.

 

We also continue to do grammar orally. We started with reading sentences aloud and asking dd to name the nouns and verbs. She can now diagram sentences properly, edit for punctuation, correct improper tense etc. but we do every bit of it orally. No reading, and no writing unless it is strict copying.

 

My girl is a lover of words and stories, and I hated to stifle her passion for writing because of her struggle with spelling. That said, Barton does a great job of building kids up to proper grammar by dividing sentences up into who/did what/add-on phrases when teaching them to read with correct phrasing. They also have kids writing their own phrases and sentences by level 4 (or was it 3?) so it is probably enough on its own, my girl just wanted more.

Totally cool way to handle things!  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...