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I picked up a copy of the 4th edition of WRTR at the library. Reading through it there are things I really like and things I really don't. The bad pronunciations are really annoying. Babi and famili with short i sounds. New pronounced n-you. drilling 70 phonograms before starting. 7 pages of rules they have to memorize. Those are all things I don't like. However, I do like the first page of rules for their notebook. And writing 6 words per day for a month in their notebooks and then they can read some real books. Those parts I like.

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I picked up a copy of the 4th edition of WRTR at the library. Reading through it there are things I really like and things I really don't. The bad pronunciations are really annoying. Babi and famili with short i sounds. New pronounced n-you. drilling 70 phonograms before starting. 7 pages of rules they have to memorize. Those are all things I don't like. However, I do like the first page of rules for their notebook. And writing 6 words per day for a month in their notebooks and then they can read some real books. Those parts I like.

 

You'll have to get over it, lol.

 

Wouldn't you trust someone who was trained extensively in speech and spelling and whatnot? Isn't is possible that you have been mistaken all these years? Or that your own pronunciation has been influenced by local accents/dialects?

 

Children don't memorize 70 phonograms before they start learning the words in the Extended Ayres List. They learn the first 54.

 

They don't memorize seven pages of rules.

 

Where did you see that children write six words a day for a month? I've been teaching Spalding for over 20 years, and I don't remember that. o_0 They write 30 words a week.

 

On page 276, it says that children begin reading the books listed in the first section after completing the writing of the spelling words up to Section I.

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I picked up a copy of the 4th edition of WRTR at the library. Reading through it there are things I really like and things I really don't. The bad pronunciations are really annoying. Babi and famili with short i sounds. New pronounced n-you. drilling 70 phonograms before starting. 7 pages of rules they have to memorize. Those are all things I don't like. However, I do like the first page of rules for their notebook. And writing 6 words per day for a month in their notebooks and then they can read some real books. Those parts I like.

 

:grouphug:

 

There is no perfect phonics curriculum. They all have their strengths and weaknesses. At least Spalding 4th is both revised and finished, so as a WHOLE it's decent. If you follow it, you might hit a few awkward spots, but the child will most likely learn to read and spell.

 

I've had the most success with Blumenfeld's How to Tutor and Spalding 4th. A LOT of students have learned to read with these two no-frills programs, as fast, or faster, than the more expensive and newer programs.

 

Focus on the big picture without getting lost in the details. Final y as short i, is more noticeable to many because it was one of the FEW phonics rules taught to many of us, but believe me, if you make a hobby out of phonics curricula, there are other more important phonics issues that go unnoticed and untalked about.

 

Phonics is messy. The writers make their money by convincing customers that they have written the only non-messy curriculum. Phonics is messy, so there never will be an non-messy curriculum. Some customers are blessed by the writer being so smooth the customer doesn't see the mess. That doesn't mean it's not there, though.

 

Blumenfeld is from New York and Boston, and I have spent a good chunk of my life in the Northeast. His brand of phonics is easier on my ear than some others. None are all that hard for me to adapt to though, have lived with people from all over the world and hearing a lot of different accents.

 

Some people like workbooks. Some like a thin book and to teach from that. Some people like kits with parts. Some like computers and DVDS. Use the STYLE of instruction you like best, because that is the one that will get done. There is a WORLD of English pronunciations out there. Phonics is messy.

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Well it says they are to write 30 words a week from October 1 to November 1.

 

I actually think I like that part. At the end they can read real books. My daughter right now does well reading words but hates the stupid stories in opg. This method would avoid that.

 

But there is no way I'm going to start saying babi or famili or nyou. But these are only a few words. I could just skip them.

 

Phonics is messy. This book actually reminded me of ruth beechicks three R's only her method is the simplified version. Not covering every single phonogram and rule.

 

I'm still waiting on how to tutor. How do you combine it with wrtr?

 

I recently began using opg because I wanted something laid out, rather than using just the three R's. I am a simple book girl. I don't want lots of parts or computer stuff for this. But I guess I'm not completely happy with it.

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Well it says they are to write 30 words a week from October 1 to November 1.

 

I actually think I like that part. At the end they can read real books. My daughter right now does well reading words but hates the stupid stories in opg. This method would avoid that.

 

But there is no way I'm going to start saying babi or famili or nyou. But these are only a few words. I could just skip them.

 

Phonics is messy. This book actually reminded me of ruth beechicks three R's only her method is the simplified version. Not covering every single phonogram and rule.

 

I'm still waiting on how to tutor. How do you combine it with wrtr?

 

I recently began using opg because I wanted something laid out, rather than using just the three R's. I am a simple book girl. I don't want lots of parts or computer stuff for this. But I guess I'm not completely happy with it.

 

The children write 30 words a week until, well, forever. They don't just stop in November.

 

Don't skip the words. Just do your own pronunciation if you must, although do you understand why Mrs. Spalding says what she does?

 

There would be no point in combining Spalding with any other method. Either do Spalding or do How to Tutor. :-)

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My dd's school uses it but they adapt the part with baby saying short i. At her school the y say 4 sounds with one being the long e sound as in baby. They didn't learn new as n-you. Maybe the adapted the ew phonogram to how most people in our country pronounce it too. I know some people probably would argue with that but I would do so myself too. ;)

 

I'm confused because 6 words a day is 30 words a week if you do 5 days a week right?

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My dd's school uses it but they adapt the part with baby saying short i and have the y say 4 sounds with one being the long e sound for baby and they didn't learn new as n-you. I know some people probably would argue with that but I would do so myself too. ;)

 

I'm confused because 6 words a day is 30 words a week if you do 5 days a week right?

 

I don't feel qualified enough to mess with Mrs. Spalding's method. :-)

 

You could do six words a day, but the manual doesn't say that. In chapter IV of the fourth edition, there's a "testimony" of a teacher who describes how she did 30 words a week. That's the only clue that the manual gives, and it's a pretty good one. :-)

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I use WRTR 4th or HTT, not both. Most of the time I use HTT, and always use HTT if I am doing cursive first. If I'm doing manuscript first, I'm more likely to do WRTR 4th.

 

It's pretty rare for someone to FINISH WRTR, that tweaked it. Now truthfully, many students will learn to read without finishing, so that's not a big deal. But if you are looking ahead to completing the notebook pages, then you will want to just do the curriculum as is. Phonics is messy and Romalda understood the mess better than we do. She really did know a LOT about phonics. I think people vastly underestimate the women's expertise. 

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Well, I'm glad I read wrtr, it actually helped me better understand some things in Ruth Beechick's method. But I don't think I'll be using it. Phonics rules just don't have any interest/meaning taught by themselves, I prefer teaching them in context. Though I may steal a few ideas to round out what I am already doing. The 4th edition is very cheap used, I may even buy a copy.

 

My reluctance to try it may have to do with the fact I feel like my dd is already being a guinea pig, as I try out different things trying to find a laid out program that I like as much as Ruth Beechick's method. Last year she did AAR level pre-1, I even bought level 1, but it jumped in difficulty too much for her then, though she could do it now. Then when I found out there were going to be four levels, each expensive, it was too much for me. I hated all the crafty stuff too, though my daughter liked it. Though at this moment I would probably have used it anyway except I leant it to a friend. This year I began doing CM style reading lessons with her, using the treadwell primer, which was going pretty well. Then it became apparent to me my daughter was still struggling with letter sounds, so we took a break from lessons and began working through pathway readers learning through sounds book for some fun practice. Then I added in OPG. I want her to master CVC and CVCe words, then go back to the CM lessons. She enjoys the primer lessons because she's getting to read a real book, not a bob book or the dumb sentences in OPG. Even though I see a lot of merit in WRTR, I'd kind of hate to make her totally change at this point. I have also researched too many phonics programs at this point and see merits in most, which just leaves me feeling confused.

 

I can be happy with my various parts I've chosen, but do they add up? It's times like this I just want to buy something complete and just follow it blindly. After writing this I went and looked at AAR again... It's so pretty and shiny. :D but it feels so overwhelming with all it's parts and of course it's $100 per level!. OPG is $20 and covers all the phonics rules too. And it's simple and easy. Its not perfect, but I guess nothing is.

 

I think you should do whatever works for you. :-) Millions of children learn to read and spell just fine with all sorts of methods and whatnot and have never heard of Spalding. :-)

 

Having said that, let me say this: Spalding doesn't teach "phonics rules;" it teaches spelling rules, but they are never taught in isolation. They are *always* taught in the context of the word being analyzed (and not every word has a rule attached).

 

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How to Tutor is more RB. The words are taught in context of other similar words. HTT reading and arithmetic are taught in tables. This is very helpful to some students.

 

In the first few lessons, 9 letters and 15 words are taught, and the student begins to write sentences at that point. This is a major milestone for my students. They sometimes cry when they write their first sentences in cursive. It is a BIG day in their lives, when they write, "Sam has an ax." and "Sam sat."

 

I will never regret studying WRTR 4th, even if I never use it again. I understand phonics better, now. Some of my students just do not need to make a hobby out of phonics, though and only need to know what they need to know, and in context of something meaningful to them. And they DEMAND cursive first.

 

And they are continuing to demand that I switch to teaching a right slating "grown up" and "Catholic school" hand. Sigh! I just got the HTT cursive handwriting video in today. I didn't know that Barbara Simkus (who wrote the HTT handwriting workbook) is left handed. I'm needing to do some reevaluating here about hands. I need to be realistic about what can be accomplished in general, with MY students, and by ME, though.

 

Barbara speaks caustically about educators that teach left-handed students like they are defective and refuse to give them the tools to do it "right". I want to do the right thing, but am not sure what is "right". Barbara was obviously a gifted child, not an LD child. Being a lefty on top of serious LDs and years/decades of educational neglect is a different scenario.

 

Another plus for teaching WRTR and all the phonograms, is if you think a student will be homeschooling their own children some day. If we benefit from knowing phonics at the hobby level, then so will our children/students if they will some day be teaching.

 

As well as there being no perfect curriculum, no curriculum is perfect for everyone. WRTR doesn't sound like a good fit for you right now.

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Yes I suppose they are taught in the context of spelling a word. But I think my dd is interested I reading not spelling, so I want to teach them in a reading context. Or maybe I should think of hem being taught in a writing context, which is more interesting than 'spelling'. Looking over the Ayers list A-G, I could see teaching her to write these words, teaching her the rules as she goes. Maybe it's the phonogram drilling part that turns me off. We've done a bit of that with AAS/AAR and it was not fun. Idk, the more I look at it the more I like it. Though I still hesitate to totally jump ship midstream.

 

Children learn to read, and improve their reading skills, by learning to spell. :-) In fact, they go from not reading to reading seamlessly. One day they just...read.

 

I love Mrs. Spalding's comments about reading, which are throughout the whole manual. It is one reason that I nag encourage people to read the whole book, cover to cover, title page to final last page of the index, multiple times before they teach the first phonogram. I even, still, get chilly bumps sometimes when I read that book. I'm such a geek! :D

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I think some children initially do better with the first few words using only a few letters and being grouped into patterns and charts, and being about something important to them. Once the basic consonants and short vowels are learned, a frequency list works just fine. But that first little bit, is sometimes better done in context of anything possible to create links.

 

For many children it just doesn't matter, and they will do fine jumping right into 54 phonograms and a frequency list. And moving into intermediate and advanced phonics, WRTR 4th is downright a piece of art; it's beautiful.

 

 

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Well I read the book cover to cover (well I only skimmed the ayres list), then reread the how to sections, and copied the first four pages of the spelling notebook before my hand gave out.

 

. And moving into intermediate and advanced phonics, WRTR 4th is downright a piece of art; it's beautiful.

Hmm. With my oldest i am teaching the intermediate and advanced phonics in the context of copy work. Now granted I dropped the ball on teaching my son to spell/write, but I like the copy work method. The part where you teach 30 words a week for one month and then they can begin reading real books is appealing, but I think I just need to chill about my dd slow progress. She is making progress, just slow. I think what I will take from this is the importance of teaching spelling alongside reading and will have my dd do a notebook (ala RB) of words as she learns the rules.

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Well I read the book cover to cover (well I only skimmed the ayres list), then reread the how to sections, and copied the first four pages of the spelling notebook before my hand gave out.

 

 

Hmm. With my oldest i am teaching the intermediate and advanced phonics in the context of copy work. Now granted I dropped the ball on teaching my son to spell/write, but I like the copy work method. The part where you teach 30 words a week for one month and then they can begin reading real books is appealing, but I think I just need to chill about my dd slow progress. She is making progress, just slow. I think what I will take from this is the importance of teaching spelling alongside reading and will have my dd do a notebook (ala RB) of words as she learns the rules.

 

I don't know where you're getting the idea that all you do is 30 words a week for one month and then they begin reading. I sort of feel like you mean that you quit teaching the words at that point..

 

This is what it says on page 146 at the end of Section H: "This is the point of accomplishment in a first grade class with 149 words by November. The class as a whole should start reading from easy books."

 

The children still need to learn the rest of the 70 phonograms, which they do at the end of Section H, as they have only learned the first 54.

 

First graders (six-year-olds) reach the end of Section L by the middle of February-ish, with 545 words in their notebooks. A good goal would be to complete the words to Section O by the end of the year.

 

Many of the instructions on what to do next, as well as helpful information, are embedded in the Extended Ayres List, which is why it's important to read ever page of that, too. :-)

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I don't know where you're getting the idea that all you do is 30 words a week for one month and then they begin reading. I sort of feel like you mean that you quit teaching the words at that point.

No, I know they continue with the 30 words a week and learning the other 16 phonograms after that. I just mean at the end of the first month they can read ten apples up on top and are you my mother, real books. Being able to read a real book would excite my daughter, I think.

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Many of the instructions on what to do next, as well as helpful information, are embedded in the Extended Ayres List, which is why it's important to read ever page of that, too. :-)

Thank you! I'm reading through WRTR for the 3rd time, 1st time taking notes. I just started chapter 6 having skipped the List. I will now be sure to read it. :)

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