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Cursive First versus Logic of English Cursive?


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This may be a crazy idea, but I'm thinking about trying some sort of cursive first curriculum with my Ker and also doing it with my 3rd grader.  My Ker likes writing, and my 3rd grader struggles.  I have had my 3rd grader do some cursive in 2nd grade, but she's definitely not fluent.  I've looked at these two programs, any thoughts?  

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I own both and find LoE far far far superior. LoE is professionally laid out and designed. My older kids are self-teaching themselves and I am really happy with the results. CF spends a lot of time talking about the why of teaching cursive without many lesson plans. I like that there is a focus on the rhythm of handwriting in LoE without sacrificing looks. 

 

I just have my 2nd and 3rd graders work on it 10 min a day by themselves. After a month, my 3rd grader is now doing spelling and writing in cursive. I'm teaching my Ker using the Foundations curriculum with cursive. You clearly could teach a Ker from the book, but of course you will be teaching. Still, my kids move at such a different rate that combining them would be hard (I've tried...).

 

Emily

 

 

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I'd expect my 3rd grader to move faster at it.  I actually had Cursive First when my oldest was about 5 but sold it.  Do you have the one cursive curriculum for both of them?    My Ker is partway through the Foundations, but not ready for the next one.  

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I am using foundations with the cursive workbook (so that is where the Ker is learning cursive). She is learning the LoE font. The 2nd and 3rd graders work independently with the LoE Rhythm of Handwriting Cursive book.

 

Isn't your Ker learning cursive in the writing part of LoE Foundations? Or, do you have the printing workbook? Even if you have the printing workbook, the instructions for how to properly form cursive letters are in the teaching book.

 

Emily

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I'm not doing Foundations, I'm doing OPGTR.  I'd be using it just for the cursive first aspect for her.  I guess one thing that deters me from LOE for the whole process is that I'm afraid tying reading, spelling, and writing together may slow down the reading.  My oldest learned to read very quickly with OPGTR, but couldn't do the writing aspect at the age she learned to write, or the spelling aspect.

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I'd expect my 3rd grader to move faster at it.  I actually had Cursive First when my oldest was about 5 but sold it.  Do you have the one cursive curriculum for both of them?    My Ker is partway through the Foundations, but not ready for the next one.  

 Sorry I see the source of the confusion.  When I looked at LOE, I saw that she'd place partway through Foundations, but I don't own any of it.

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If you don't want to do reading/spelling/writing with LOE you don't have to. You can just get the Rhythm of Handwriting Book and just use that for pure handwriting instruction unconnected to anything else.

Have you used it?  Are you happy with it as a handwriting instruction guide, esp for Kers?  Thank you!

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You definitely can use the Rhythm of Handwriting Book for a Ker if you are willing to teach it. I really like the sandpaper cards, though they are pricey. 

 

I think LoE cursive combines what I liked about Peterson (rhythm, strokes) with an easy-to-read and attractive handwriting.

 

Each letter has a bunch of different line sizes. In Foundations, the child tries out the line sizes with their first assignment and chooses a favorite size to use in the future. My daughter enjoys writing one letter on each size. You could even use it in multiple years; this year, use the big line size, next year, use the medium line size, the third year, use the smallest line size.

 

You'll have to decide how to do your lessons, since there aren't really lesson plans, but all you need to know to teach it is in their. You might want to buy the desk strip or reference so you can easily look back at what all the letters are supposed to look like.

 

I own both LoE and Cursive First and find LoE so much more accessible and well designed. Although my daughter had a hard time at first, 5-10 minutes a day of writing has really led to large leaps.

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After using CF successfully with my little man and viewing the samples of LOE cursive just now, I'd pick CF all over again hands down. But then, I also prefer SWR over LOE as well. LOE seems to have a lot of unnecessary fluff, imo.

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Rhythm of Handwriting is great - you can use it for handwriting only (without connecting it to sounds/reading). It's a good looking hand, all the strokes are simplified, and they emphasize the rhythm of writing, rather than forming a correct image of a letter. I bought the ebook so I could print out pages for multiple kids. We also have the sandpaper cards, and they are great (and have all the stroke instructions on the back). I taught this this last year to 1st and 3rd graders.

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Have you looked at Handwriting without Tears curriculum? It was developed by an OT, and it is wonderful.

I have but I don't like the font! Isn't that petty. :) Also I found that my oldest had trouble switching between the boxes in HWT and the typical dashed lines found in other areas.
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