Menu
Jump to content

What's with the ads?

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

~Victoria~

Recorder curriculum recommendations?

Recommended Posts

I was planning to start my son on piano next year (taught by dad) but I think a year of recorder (taught by me) might be easier for 1st grade and our scheduling. I read music and feel pretty confident that I could teach him but I'd love some recs for curriculum. Something I could pay for and download or free stuff would be great, but actual hard copies to buy would be fine too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My son's school uses Joy Tunes, the "Recorder Master" version, online.  It was very gentle and walks them through the notes.  You have to have a microphone on your computer as you get points based on how well you can play the notes and songs.  My son loved it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks!  I'll be checking all those out :)

 

ETA: I really like the looks of the Quick Nine-Note book!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I bought The New Nine-Note Recorder Method Book by Penny Gardner for dd when she was around 7.  She went through the book by herself and learned recorder basics.  It was great that the book had a built in stand.  It's also well written.  I'd recommend it based on our experience.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I bought The New Nine-Note Recorder Method Book by Penny Gardner for dd when she was around 7. She went through the book by herself and learned recorder basics. It was great that the book had a built in stand. It's also well written. I'd recommend it based on our experience.

It looks like the difference between the quick and new is that the quick has less songs and it doesn't teach 2 harder time signatures. Did she do all the content from the new?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really like "Do it! Play Recorder" as a traditional method for parents or older DC. It does have more of a learning curve and more reading required than most recorder books, but is well written for at home use and for self-teaching, while a lot of books are written for classroom use.

 

Recorder Karate, Dexter Dragon's Recorder Adventure, and other Plank Road publications collections, especially the M.C. Handel ones are really fun and often quite easy (some only require 1-2 notes), and have good accompaniment tracks, so are very motivational for young players. The downside is that they can be kind of expensive for individual family purchases (many of them actually come with the accompaniments online, with the idea that you teach them in a group setting and give the kids the code for the website to use at home). These are GREAT for a co-op.

 

I'm a Suzuki-trained recorder teacher, and I strongly recommend the Suzuki recordings for listening and the Suzuki volumes for supplemental repertoire down the road. I don't suggest that a parent with little or no recorder experience themselves and no Suzuki background try to teach from the Suzuki volumes-they're definitely not user-friendly, and there are some tricks used in teaching very young children recorder that are almost required to get success on the first songs in the book that simply aren't listed in the book.

 

Good luck!

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I bought The New Nine-Note Recorder Method Book by Penny Gardner for dd when she was around 7.  She went through the book by herself and learned recorder basics.  It was great that the book had a built in stand.  It's also well written.  I'd recommend it based on our experience.

 

We did the original Nine Note Recorder by Penny Gardner, and had the same very positive and successful experience -- gentle, incremental, self-teaching. We also would recommend it based on our experience (which was with two very non-musical DC).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Same size..sizes have to do with sound not body type...

 

we do the nine note too and the joytunes as well and have enjoyed them.

 

go with a good quality plastic for this age ...not cheapo sparkly 5 dollar plastic or 80 dollar wood

15 or 20 bucks 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It looks like the difference between the quick and new is that the quick has less songs and it doesn't teach 2 harder time signatures. Did she do all the content from the new?

 

I just asked her and she said she didn't do the entire book, but she did at least half.  I hadn't ever asked. *blush*  It was just one of those books I got "for fun." 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We did the original Nine Note Recorder by Penny Gardner, and had the same very positive and successful experience -- gentle, incremental, self-teaching. We also would recommend it based on our experience (which was with two very non-musical DC).

 

We have the Yamaha YRS-23 recorder. Neither dh nor I ever learnt to read or play music and our dd is also very non-musical :(. Do you think we can use this book to teach our dd the recorder?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have the Yamaha YRS-23 recorder. Neither dh nor I ever learnt to read or play music and our dd is also very non-musical :(. Do you think we can use this book to teach our dd the recorder?

 

I would think so. The recorder is a very simple instrument to learn, and the Nine-Note Recorder book is very gentle and clear, with charts at the beginning to show the fingering to make a particular note, and matches it with what the note looks like on the musical staff. As I recall, the book teaches 3 notes to start with, has a page or two of different very short practice pieces, teaches another note, and then has a very short song.

 

So it builds slowly and gently, and you can take as long as you need/want until you're ready to move on. It's been quite a few years since DSs did it, but as I recall, we did the first 1-2 pages, and practiced it every day for a week, and then moved on to the next page.

 

on YouTube videos allow you to simultaneously see the musical notation (the sheet music), the fingering chart, and a person actually playing the music, which might help you, the parent see how the musical notation works (how long to hold a note, the rests, and matching up the fingering for each different note).
look very helpful, too, with verbal and visual specific instruction.

 

Enjoy learning to make music all together! :) Warmest regards, Lori D.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are sound files on the Nine-Note site to help you with rhythm and counting notes as well. I think there are files for all of the songs in the book, but don't quote me on that.

 

 

We have the Yamaha YRS-23 recorder. Neither dh nor I ever learnt to read or play music and our dd is also very non-musical :(. Do you think we can use this book to teach our dd the recorder?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, Lori and pitterpatter! I will buy the book.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...