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michaeljenn

Best math program with hand holding for the mom...

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I am looking for a math program that has plenty of hand holding for this non mathy mom!  I need something that is not pricey, and that has plenty of review.  At this point, I am leaning towards Christian Light or Horizons math.  However, I cannot really get a feel for the teacher's manual with just a few sample pages.  This would be for a 2nd and 4th grader... 

 

Thanks,

Jennifer

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Neither. Rod and Staff. It's mastery, with regular review sections that keep old concepts fresh. You can see samples at milestonebooks.com

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The Amish Study Time math has amazing teacher support. It is written to be used by teeenaged teachers with a grade 8 education, who speak English as a second langauge.

 

You can buy it at Rainbow Resource and Milestonebooks.com

 

For high school, Saxon has been all I can teach after algebra 2. I need to do every problem along with the student, starting at Algebra1, but if I do that, I can teach myself and then the student.

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We switched to BJU for my middle kiddo because I had the same needs, but I also wanted it to be "fun" and engaging with lots of hands on stuff.  I hesitated about suggesting it, because BJU is pricey new...but if you can get a used TM, I think it's a lot cheaper, so I thought I'd throw it out there.  I find it very open and go and it's scripted, but not in a stilted way.  If my oldest wasn't doing so well with TT, I'd put her into BJU too. LOL

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Neither. Rod and Staff. It's mastery, with regular review sections that keep old concepts fresh. You can see samples at milestonebooks.com

 

^^  R&S has worked very well at my house.  The 2nd grade has lots and lots of review.  You may even get to skip some of it and be labeled a cool mom. :)

 

The TM's are very well done.  I've used 1st-7th grade so far, and it has done wonders for my child who was struggling and feeling very upset about his ability in math. 

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Another vote for Rod and Staff.

 

The second grade book, Working Arithmetic, requires you to teach, and it gives you a wonderful script to follow. The lessons are not very long. :-) Then you assign the seatwork, and your dc works independently while you give yourself a facial. Ok, maybe not a facial. :D Beginning with the fourth grade text, all the instruction is in the student text. There is oral scripted classtime, but it is absolutely optional, as there is no new information, nothing that is not in the student text. You decide for yourself if you want to have some face time, and how much you and your dc will need. It's all there.

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We've liked CLE here, but I know nothing about R&S math, which others have mentioned.  For your 2nd grader, you would need the Teacher's Manuals.  4th grade can be much more independent, and some people just get the Answer Keys. We supplement CLE a bit (especially in the younger grades) with c-rods, Education Unboxed Videos online, and/or Math Made Meaningful.  What math(s) have you used up until this point (so we can know what you DON'T like)? :)

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I reallly like BJU. It is fun for the kids, hands-on, clean pages, extra review book if needed, wonderful teacher's manual. The TM is pricey, but like another poster said if you can get it used, not too bad.

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CLE, MUS and MM are all very easy to use and geared toward maximum independence.  we've never tried R&S.  Of those mentioned CLE is the only truly spiral program with constant review.   We use it for the review and then supplement with MM for added depth and challenge.  Though we are moving more toward MM now as I find it stronger overall.

 

Just keep in mind that you will still have to help out on occasion when they have questions.  But elementary math is pretty easy to do that with.  The real challenge will come when you start algebra and beyond.  Remembering all that stuff can be quite a challenge for some of us who haven't seen it in decades.  :tongue_smilie:

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I am really liking CLE it is spiral and integrated. So you are constantly reviewing. It is well scripted too.

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I agree with those who have plugged CLE.  We've tried a lot of math programs, because my oldest struggled. We've used Horizons 2 and 4, as well as CLE 200 and 400 levels.  The Horizon's teacher's manual has very little actual teaching instruction. It might say "teach the clock."  That's it. It was not enough help for me.

 

CLE is much more specific and incremental.  The teacher's manual suggests activities and ways to present the material, but I mainly use it for grading, because the instructions in the student workbooks are sufficient.  In the TM for the 200 level, the student papers are reproduced with the answers filled in. I think the 400 level has a TM, but I don't buy it.  Instead I buy an answer key that just has the answers for every problem listed. It's actually pretty significant that I don't feel the need to purchase the 400 TM, because I have very little confidence in my ability to teach math without specific guidance. The instructions in the student workbooks are sufficient, even for my non-mathy DD. 

 

One other thing about Horizons -- there would often be a whole page of addition problems or subtraction problems.  It was visually overwhelming for my kids -- it seemed like too much. CLE includes plenty of practice, but it is not in big chunks like that; it is in smaller sections, but practiced every single day.  In the back of the workbook, there is a daily timed math drill page, so I'm sure the kids do just as many problems, but the format seems more accessible for them.

 

One note if you decide to go with CLE:  They have their own system for flashcards.  If you think you will do the recommended daily flashcard drill (only 5 minutes), it is worth it to buy their set of cards.  The directions will say "Practice set B of the flashcards for five minutes," and if you do not have their exact set, you will have to come up with your own system.

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I'd suggest Rod and Staff. Something that moves at a slightly slower pace in Modern Curriculum Press. Another option you may want to consider is Saxon if you purchase the Saxon teacher cd.

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Saxon, hands down--easy to teach as you just follow the script. As you become more comfortable, you can go off-script a bit.

It's all laid out for you, and you don't have to learn something new yourself, like with Right Start or MUS.

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Thank you for all the responses... I have completely forgot about Rod and Staff!  My 9yo actually loves Rod and Staff English and will actually CHOOSE to write out all the answers to all the exercises! LOL  She is an English nerd.  After looking at the math samples, I have chosen Rod and Staff.  It makes sense that she will love their math as well.  We will then probably move on to Saxon after 8th grade.  

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The Horizon's teacher's manual has very little actual teaching instruction. It might say "teach the clock."  That's it. It was not enough help for me.

 

I have to agree with this because I found it so frustrating.  This is why we're switching to CLE for math for 5th grade. 

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