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Mastering spelling lessons but not translating into everyday writing


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I am wondering if it is normal to have a lag between mastering spelling lessons and this translating into everyday writing. My dd7 is constantly misspelling words in her writing that I know she knows how to spell. I would love to see these spelling skills integrating a little more. Anyone have suggestions or do I just need to be patient? We are using and loving AAS. Thanks!

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Yes this is very normal.  When a child is writing a spelling test, they are typically only focused on the spelling, but when they are writing in other contexts, they are also concentrating on meaning, spacing, punctuation, capitalization, etc.   SWB mentions in one of her lectures that usually by age 9 they are able to apply what they have learned in other settings, and my own experience has been the same.

 

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I forgot to say that with my daughter, when we were doing revisions, I would say things like, "Have another look at "ovver"... Does that look right to you?"  (Might see the mistake, might not) "Can you think of a spelling strategy we could use to figure out the right spelling?"  (Maybe she can, or I suggest one).  "Right, so when we divide the syllables of ov-ver, we can see that we don't need the double v.  We want the long sound of O, so we need an open syllable."  Basically, I try to help her to identify her own mistakes, and then walk her through the correction explicitly if it is a rule/word she knows.

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I suggest you use dictation for spelling. And I would not fuss about the spelling of things in other writing just yet. You will inhibit the creative process. Work on the mechanics of writing in dictation and focus on coming up with ideas and getting them in words for writing. Eventually your child will be ready to combine the two.

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Yep, perfectly normal. I think using language well is a bit like learning to drive. In the beginning, you panic about operating all the pedals, shifting gear, looking in the mirror, changing lanes, etc etc all at the same time, but once you've been driving for years, you can listen to music, answer kids' questions, and navigate to an unfamiliar venue all at once without even thinking about how often to glance in the mirrors, when to indicate or how hard to press the gas pedal. Similarly, it's hard to spell correctly at the same time as formulating ideas and turning them into sentences if you are still a fairly new writer-in-training.  :driving:

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