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Home inspection - take door and window frame off?


Gwenny
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The potential buyers of our house just did a home inspection.  They think the windows may have let water seep into the wall and want to take the window wrap (think that's what they called it) off and poke around inside the wall to look for mold.  They also said my side door lacks z flashing (no clue what that is), and they want to take the molding and frame apart to look for mold.  The say they will return it to original condition after they are done.  I doubt they will because I just caulked, patched, and painted that door frame weeks ago.  I can't imagine the inspector re-caulking and re-painting it for me after he replaces it.  Plus, at 56 years old, I doubt he's even going to get the frame off in one piece. 

 

Doesn't this seem excessive?  The buyer has bad lungs, and truthfully, I think she'd be better off buying new construction.  You can't expect mold and rat free perfection from an old house.

 

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Both of those things are pretty simple tasks for someone who knows construction.  I've seen many doors and windows removed and replaced.  Typically there's no need to repaint.

 

I'd probably do it if I thought the buyers were truly serious, and if they signed a statement agreeing to put everything back in the original condition.  And I'd take "before" pictures, just in case.

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One of the main reasons I don't want to let them do this is that if they find mold, they won't buy it.  I'd then have to disclose the fact that there is mold to all other buyers.  No one will want to buy a house with mold.  It's an old starter home and I think the chances of finding mold are pretty high.  I know the door frame will be hard to return to original condition, because I had to do a lot of patching on it.  There was a screen door attached to it previously.  The screen door blew off in a hurricane and we decided not to replace it.  The metal frame the screen door was attached to left areas I had to fill in with wood filler.

 

The buyers must be pretty serious, because they are willing to pay for this.  In addition, they are here out of state and really seem to want this wrapped up quickly.  They had the inspection the day after we signed the offer.

 

In this price range, we have one of the nicest homes, so I hope that will help encourage them to continue despite my refusing to let them do their inspection.  They can walk away, but they may have to settle for a less renovated/updated home.

 

Thanks for the suggestion of an air quality test.  I think that would be more valuable to them anyway.  Even if mold was present in the wall below the window, I couldn't understand how it would get into the air.  It would have to penetrate the plaster walls, wouldn't it?  The fact that the plaster is intact suggest to me that there couldn't be too much moisture entering through the window flashing.  Plaster is famous for crumbling and falling apart when wet.

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excessive to me.  the reason you don't let a potential buyer live in the home as a rental before they buy it.  if they want to buy it - they can wait.

 

to your knowledge there isn't any mold so she can't hold you responsible if they do find some after a sale is final.  but if she rips it open (even if she puts everything back like it was) and finds mold - YOU will be on the hook with every potential buyer, not just her.  (and if they find mold - she won't buy it so you'll be trying to find a new buyer.)

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One of the main reasons I don't want to let them do this is that if they find mold, they won't buy it.  I'd then have to disclose the fact that there is mold to all other buyers. 

 

Well, I think that is a very smart decision. 

 

I don't think it's very honest, frankly, because you do seem to think it's a reasonable possibility and not finding it serves only you, not your buyers--but I don't think you're asking that here.  It'd suck to be the buyer and find it in a few months.  (I hope you read this as I'm saying it in my head, just matter of fact, not judging or sarcastic, or anything otherwise negative.)

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Well, I think that is a very smart decision.

 

I don't think it's very honest, frankly, because you do seem to think it's a reasonable possibility and not finding it serves only you, not your buyers--but I don't think you're asking that here. It'd suck to be the buyer and find it in a few months. (I hope you read this as I'm saying it in my head, just matter of fact, not judging or sarcastic, or anything otherwise negative.)

But, no house is perfect. Most people buy a house knowing that things will be wrong with it. That doesn't mean you are allowed to rip into the place to check it out. No way would I allow this.

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But, no house is perfect. Most people buy a house knowing that things will be wrong with it. That doesn't mean you are allowed to rip into the place to check it out. No way would I allow this.

 

Yes, but you hope that the seller gives you an opportunity to look for something that is obviously suspected, particularly if you know you might have an adverse reaction to it.  No house is perfect, hence the inspection to find issues so you know what you are buying instead of going in blind, thinking, gee, something might be wrong, I think I'll cross my fingers . . .

 

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It's excessive and I would suggest a less invasive alternative. 

 

I would think an inspector would not want to do that level of work, aren't most working for a set fee. To rehang doors and redo a window would go way beyond a normal inspection requirement. 

 

Perhaps they've had issue with mold in the past and I would try to do something to placate their concerns, but I wouldn't let them damage the house. 

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I agree with Moxie. They need to be doing an air quality test, not taking things apart.

I don't know how it is in your state, but where I am, the sellers did not have to allow a mold test at all unless it was specifically requested in the purchase offer. We requested mold tests both times we went through the inspection process. Had we not done that, we would not have been able to use mold as a reason to back out of an offer. (FTR, we didn't use mold as a reason to back out of the first house. We backed out due to severely unsafe wiring throughout the entire home.) So, you may want to ask your seller's Realtor if you could just say "no" without putting the offer in jeopardy? 

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