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Is the dictation in AAS 2 alone enough for second grade?


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Up to this point, we haven't done structured dictation outside of AAS. TWTM says to complete dictation three times per week for second grade. I downloaded the The Modern Speller (pretty much the same as Dictation Day by Day) by Van Wagenen to use for dictation this year, but now I'm wondering whether we need additional dictation. Thoughts?

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I think it probably depends on the kid and your reasons for doing dictation. I know that AAS dictation has helped my kids hold longer thoughts in their heads. The sentences aren't very complex though. No commas or quotation marks. So once a week we use WWE for dictation which gives a longer more complex sentence. I think this helps them practice their writing and listening skills. We also us FLL which will throw in a dictation sentence once in a while.

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So, probably not then. I took a better look at my dictation book and the sentences definitely get more complex the second half of second grade. Thanks for helping me think this out. Just wanted to be sure it wasn't overkill. I tend to do that.

 

 

I think it probably depends on the kid and your reasons for doing dictation. I know that AAS dictation has helped my kids hold longer thoughts in their heads. The sentences aren't very complex though. No commas or quotation marks. So once a week we use WWE for dictation which gives a longer more complex sentence. I think this helps them practice their writing and listening skills. We also us FLL which will throw in a dictation sentence once in a while.

 

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I don't want to say it's not enough exactly, but for us part of the purpose of dictation is to see high quality writing (even if, at this age, it's still on the simple side) and the AAS dictations just don't fill that.  They're fine, but pretty simple because they have a limited vocabulary.  I think you could add a simple copywork from whatever book you're reading aloud once a week and have that be enough.  Those would have more vocabulary, richer structures, and more mechanics to practice.

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I don't want to say it's not enough exactly, but for us part of the purpose of dictation is to see high quality writing (even if, at this age, it's still on the simple side) and the AAS dictations just don't fill that.  They're fine, but pretty simple because they have a limited vocabulary.  I think you could add a simple copywork from whatever book you're reading aloud once a week and have that be enough.  Those would have more vocabulary, richer structures, and more mechanics to practice.

 

Yes, to me there are two reasons for dictation/copywork--one is to work on mechanics, and the other to work on literary elements or to see examples of high quality writing. 

 

The AAS dictation is designed mainly for working on spelling. You will see commas in some of the upper levels, but not a lot of other types of punctuation. Some capitalization but not a lot...and so on. If you want dictation for all of those purposes, you will likely want to add in other things occasionally. (In 2nd grade, I was happy with basic capitalization and ending punctuation, but as you progress through the grades you may want more). Here's a blog article on using copywork and dictation to work on mechanics.

 

AAS dictation is not the same as selecting text from a quality reader and studying beautiful writing. I love to use copywork for that personally. Here's a blog article on using copywork/dictation for studying literary elements. Just thinking about it makes me want to re-read The Journeyman to my kids!

 

Merry :-)

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Thank you, I appreciate reading in depth how someone else does dictation.

 

I found another wonderful blog post a couple of days. I wish I could remember the site. It really sang to me because I just discovered my DD has good visual memory and enjoys the puzzle of remembering.

 

Looked it up in my browser history...http://www.charlottemasonhelp.com/2009/07/dictation.html.

 

I plan to start with The Modern Speller today since we're on our summer schedule and have time. Thought it best to ease into it and DD already knows how to spell many of the words from the early sentences. It starts ramping up the second part of second grade in regard to punctuation.

 

The part I struggle with is not knowing what to do if she misspells something. Some say to stop the child and immediately erase and help her write it correctly so the brain doesn't remember the incorrect word. Others have the student check her work after the entire dictation is written and correct any misspelled words then. Ugh.

 

 

Yes, to me there are two reasons for dictation/copywork--one is to work on mechanics, and the other to work on literary elements or to see examples of high quality writing. 

 

The AAS dictation is designed mainly for working on spelling. You will see commas in some of the upper levels, but not a lot of other types of punctuation. Some capitalization but not a lot...and so on. If you want dictation for all of those purposes, you will likely want to add in other things occasionally. (In 2nd grade, I was happy with basic capitalization and ending punctuation, but as you progress through the grades you may want more). Here's a blog article on using copywork and dictation to work on mechanics.

 

AAS dictation is not the same as selecting text from a quality reader and studying beautiful writing. I love to use copywork for that personally. Here's a blog article on using copywork/dictation for studying literary elements. Just thinking about it makes me want to re-read The Journeyman to my kids!

 

Merry :-)

 

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The part I struggle with is not knowing what to do if she misspells something. Some say to stop the child and immediately erase and help her write it correctly so the brain doesn't remember the incorrect word. Others have the student check her work after the entire dictation is written and correct any misspelled words then. Ugh.

 

Personally I go with the second method. I think a student needs time to commit to a spelling before correcting. It's frustrating to be corrected for something that you know, just because you accidentally made a mistake. Plus, it would drive me nuts to have someone watching over my shoulder and pouncing as soon as I made a mistake (and no matter how gently the mistake was pointed out, it would feel like pouncing to me!). I need a little space to do work, and I feel students need that same personal respect.

 

I also think that the first method teaches the student to rely on others to correct errors, while the second encourages the student to be a good editor. 

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I've used both methods. I usually use the latter, but every once in awhile there's a word that they learned to spell wrong and have now written hundreds of times incorrectly and it's a struggle to get them to rewrite it in their brains. For those, I stop immediately - because I know they won't see it. The right way to spell it looks wrong to them.

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I would worry less about 2nd grade expectations, and look at what your child is doing.  Are the dictations in AAS pushing her limit?  Are they easy for her?  Only add to her work if her current work is easy for her.  If you do add dictations, take a look at the Charlotte Mason link.  

 

 

If I'm dictating words, I correct before the pencil lifts from the page.  My corrections sound more like a hint than a tsk tsk.  ("The word peach has an 'ea' phonogram for the /ee/ sound."  Rather than, "It's supposed to be a double 'e'.")  

 

 

If I'm dictating a sentence or a passage, I let them finish the sentence and find their own mistakes.  The only exception to that is if I see that their mistake might cause them to have to erase 1/2 of their work. I don't want them to get frustrated, and having to redo work is frustrating for mine.

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Thanks, everyone! I'm going with method two, except in extreme cases. I would think it would mess up DD's train of thought, if I were to interrupt her in the middle of a sentence that she can only hear read to her one time. Plus, she likes checking her work. We're going with studied dictation too. I may add some cold dictation is here and there as things pop up in other curriculum. 

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