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Cross Post: CAP Writing/Rhetoric or EiW & Megawords or other spelling?


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I tried on the K-8 board, and got no response, so trying here.

 

Regarding my 8yo gifted child.  She completed MBTP 8-10 (some LA units, all science/history) & Bravewriter Partnership Writing this year and does really well, but I am having difficulty placing her in LA (her strong subject).  She's a good writer when she wants to write, but I'm finding the assignments she is engaged with to be few.  I am not confident at teaching writing....at all.  Which of these would be a better fit?  And which level should I use, considering that she's completed a gifted 3rd/regular 4th program already?   Do I use 5th grade EiW?  Start at the beginning with CAP W/R?

 

 

Spelling.  She is a natural speller, and I've been using myspellit.com list of frequently misspelled words for her this spring.  My thought with MegaWords is that it would make up for the fact that we've done very little phonics since she learned to read so easily.  However, the words on the sample I saw look really easy!  I think I was looking at level 2.  Suggestions for spelling/word study?

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My natural speller did a quick run-through of Spelling Power. She placed into level G, but I backed her up and did selected lists from E & F. She finished the whole thing in less than a year and then I switched her to Hexco Academic spelling bee prep materials.

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I'm using Megawords right now.  I don't think it would be a great choice for a natural speller.  If you want a phonics-based approach then Rod and Staff spelling workbooks are good.  The phonics-based activities are more challenging than the weekly word lists.  Although, I quit doing spelling with my natural speller after he was able to correctly spell most words from an 8th grade spelling curriculum.  It has been a couple years now and his spelling skills have continued to improve without doing any program.

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I'm using Megawords right now.  I don't think it would be a great choice for a natural speller.  If you want a phonics-based approach then Rod and Staff spelling workbooks are good.  The phonics-based activities are more challenging than the weekly word lists.  Although, I quit doing spelling with my natural speller after he was able to correctly spell most words from an 8th grade spelling curriculum.  It has been a couple years now and his spelling skills have continued to improve without doing any program.

 

Thank you.  I will look at other programs then.  RS 5th looked perfect, but unfortunately I am using a ps at home option where I must use secular products.

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Have you looked at Spelling Power 6?

 

It starts with basic phonics, but with "big" words.

 

I'm in the middle of contemplating whether the SP lessons could be rounded out with HTTS to make something awesome....

 

Another option - I saw at my library a book called Handling Words (there is also a volume 2). It starts at basic and moves quickly through all the spelling rules. Interesting thing is that it uses IPA notation a lot, so that necessitates learning phonics very well. If that's something that you think may be of interest for your dd that might be a good fit.

 

 

As for CAP W&R, they have the first few chapters of each book on their website as a sample. You can print it all out for Fable and do a trial run.

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I have looked at the Glencoe Spelling Power....it looks ok, though not as thorough or challenging as R&S.  I would prefer something I can order a workbook for rather than a download I have to print (the school pays for workbooks, not ink.)  Do they still sell this?  I didn't find it.

 

The Handling Words...maybe...there isn't much description to go on!  I'll look and see if my library has it.

 

Is CAP W&R secular?  I don't see it in the school library, but I see Latin for Children in the library...so I was just wondering why one and not the other.  If they won't approve CAP W&R, that may answer that question!

 

EiW is Essentials in Writing, SparklyUnicorn.  Thanks for the description of CAP W&R.  Do you find it time consuming to teach?  If its open-ended in requirements, how do you get your children to write 'more'? (My dd will do the minimum required most of the time.)

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The Spelling Power I used is not by Glencoe but the one recommended in TWTM. The author's name is Beverly Adams-Gordon. This is the current edition: http://www.rainbowresource.com/product/Spelling+Power+4th+Edition+%28Adams-Gordon%92s%29/002784

 

I have the 3rd edition.

 

I've used it and sold it. :)    It did not work for my older kids...though, it might work for this one!  That said, I think I prefer a workbook and allowing spelling to be independent work.  Right now we are using Homespellingwords.com and pre-testing, then having them write words 5x one day, write sentences the next, and testing on day 4.  That works and is free vs. buying that book.....but a workbook with words selected would be handy and if it addresses phonics even better!

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Is CAP W&R secular? I don't see it in the school library, but I see Latin for Children in the library...so I was just wondering why one and not the other. If they won't approve CAP W&R, that may answer that question!

 

 

I don't see how it could be even though I see many secular folks using it. I only looked closely at a Narrative 1 which focuses a good bit on Biblical parables which have no place in a writing curriculum in our secular education.

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It includes some content from the bible - several parables - but it also includes stories from many other traditions.  More Greek mythology than anything else.  It's in no way preachy or intrusive, or evangilizing in any way, shape or form however.  So yes, I'd say it's secular, but containing content from various religious and cultural traditions.

 

I did this count once before.  In Fable, you have 14 lessons, none of which are religious, they are all based on fables.  It does quote a few scriptures - from Proverbs & Ecclesiastes - as possible morals, but it also quotes African, Indian, Chinese and Italian proverbs.  Pretty equal-opportunity.

 

Narrative 1 has 10 lessons/9 with stories.  Three of them involve biblical parables. four are Greek myths, 1 is Roman, and one is American tales/

 

We haven't run into any christian content in Narrative 2 so far - it's all been Greek, Roman, or Indian stories.

 

I'm an atheist and pretty sensitive to religious content in my curriculum choices; However, I have no problem with - in fact encourage - my children being exposed to literature from the Christian tradition alongside others, with none privileged. I've had no problem with using the W&R materials.  OTOH.  If you want to avoid any and all content from any religious tradition, then you will probably not like this program.

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I don't see how it could be even though I see many secular folks using it. I only looked closely at a Narrative 1 which focuses a good bit on Biblical parables which have no place in a writing curriculum in our secular education.

 

Would you object to an assignment to rewrite a myth from a different culture? To me personally Bible stories are not myth, but if I were not Christian, I would treat them the same way I treat stories from other cultures.

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Would you object to an assignment to rewrite a myth from a different culture? To me personally Bible stories are not myth, but if I were not Christian, I would treat them the same way I treat stories from other cultures.

OP asked if it were secular, and I think looking at it in black and white, it's not and would likely not be covered by her funding.

 

And, no, I absolutely do not treat Christian-centric content the same as I do Greek mythology or other traditions. Other traditions simply don't invoke the same strong personal, social, and historical response.

 

We discuss Christianity at a much deeper level than all other traditions because it had a much more personal, social, and historical impact on my life and my daughter's heritage. It is simply impossible for me to set all that aside and treat it like other traditions. So, even though we are not Christians, its impact is too significant on our personal and cultural history to be included in the same way.

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I am Christian...I like Christian content, but its a matter if the school would approve it, or see it as Christian.  It sounds like it might be worth a shot to request it, and see if they would approve it. So, I guess whether I do or not depends on whether I want EiW or CAP W&R.  Can anyone compare?

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OP asked if it were secular, and I think looking at it in black and white, it's not and would likely not be covered by her funding.

 

My kids are enrolled in a charter, and materials that teach ABOUT religion as literature or history are fine to purchase with the stipend. They just cannot be religious ed materials. So CAP W&R would be fine to purchase, but their "God's Great Covenant" Bible curriculum would not. Similarly, SOTW is fine, but PHP's "Telling God's Story" would not.

 

Just because a book uses the Bible as ONE literary selection out of many, does not make it not secular. I've got some PS high school world literature textbooks on my shelf, and they all include selections from the Bible, the Koran, and other religious texts. "Secular" does not mean "religion-free". It means that it treats religious texts as literature or history rather than theological guidance.

 

 

And, no, I absolutely do not treat Christian-centric content the same as I do Greek mythology or other traditions. Other traditions simply don't invoke the same strong personal, social, and historical response.

 

You sound like you've got your own personal hangups and are letting those bias your definition of what is and what isn't "secular".

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My kids are enrolled in a charter, and materials that teach ABOUT religion as literature or history are fine to purchase with the stipend. They just cannot be religious ed materials. So CAP W&R would be fine to purchase, but their "God's Great Covenant" Bible curriculum would not. Similarly, SOTW is fine, but PHP's "Telling God's Story" would not.

 

Just because a book uses the Bible as ONE literary selection out of many, does not make it not secular. I've got some PS high school world literature textbooks on my shelf, and they all include selections from the Bible, the Koran, and other religious texts. "Secular" does not mean "religion-free". It means that it treats religious texts as literature or history rather than theological guidance.

 

 

 

You sound like you've got your own personal hangups and are letting those bias your definition of what is and what isn't "secular".

That's an interesting perspective! Thanks for the insight.

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I have looked at the Glencoe Spelling Power....it looks ok, though not as thorough or challenging as R&S.  I would prefer something I can order a workbook for rather than a download I have to print (the school pays for workbooks, not ink.)  Do they still sell this?  I didn't find it.

 

The Handling Words...maybe...there isn't much description to go on!  I'll look and see if my library has it.

 

 

 

Spelling Power is weird since it is one of those curriculums that has the same chapter titles for each and every grade level. When I was looking through it, grade 6 introduces prefixes and says that the spelling doesn't change when you add it to a word. Umm, huh? When comparing it to HTTS I saw that the prefixes they list in that chapter don't change spelling. In the same chapter in grade 7 some prefixes that do change spelling are introduced. And so on. This method drives me crazy. I much prefer AAS which just starts at A and ends at Z. But AAS moves sooo veeery sloooowlyyy..... And it gets expensive to just blow through it, even without the student packet. But, if you have a charter budget, maybe they would spring for all the TM? Using the TM and a whiteboard or scrap paper you could move through it at a pretty good pace.

 

And, yeah, I browsed through SP 12 and saw that the rules for c or g followed by e, i, or y are introduced there. Twelfth grade? Seriously? My kid just covered this in AAS2. It's not hard.

 

I believe in the phonics + rules approach when it comes to spelling, so that's the only reason why SP is on my radar. Handling Words looked interesting because it seemed to be a lot like AAS, except written at a higher level and moving quicker. But, no, there doesn't seem to be any way to see sample pages of it on the world wide web.

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