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yucabird
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I’m making third grade plans, and SYS seems like it might benefit my visual learner (who could also stand some extra handwriting practice). 


This is a relatively new program, and I haven’t heard much about it…just reviews from those who may have been given copies.  I’d like to hear from HSers who have made a purchase.  Does anyone use this program?  If so, what do you think? 

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I just looked at the site, and I would never, ever use that program.  

 

From the site: "In the phonetic stage, most instruction involves helping children match individual sounds in words to their corresponding letters, usually starting with their own names. They often use all capital letters and spell words incorrectly. For example, they may spell KAT for catMI for myLUV for love, and U for you. Silent letters in words like bake or lamb may be omitted. Instructors welcome these spellings as an indication that the student is beginning to understand sound-to-letter correspondence."

 

I am a big believer in the philosophy that what you learn first is what you learn best.  If you, as the teacher, welcome phonetic misspellings, then you are going to have a lot of remediation to do later.  In the spelling program we use, we do not allow the child to misspell a word.  We make sure they already know how to spell it and why it is spelled that way before they write it.  

 

I once made the mistake of pointing out a homonym to a word in my dd's spelling list.  The program said not to do this, but she was good speller, and I thought it would be interesting to her.  She ended up spelling it the wrong way for what seemed like forever.  It took months to get the wrong spelling out of her head.  But when I teach her the way the program is written, she does very well.  

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I just looked at the site, and I would never, ever use that program.  

 

From the site: "In the phonetic stage, most instruction involves helping children match individual sounds in words to their corresponding letters, usually starting with their own names. They often use all capital letters and spell words incorrectly. For example, they may spell KAT for catMI for myLUV for love, and U for you. Silent letters in words like bake or lamb may be omitted. Instructors welcome these spellings as an indication that the student is beginning to understand sound-to-letter correspondence."

 

I am a big believer in the philosophy that what you learn first is what you learn best.  If you, as the teacher, welcome phonetic misspellings, then you are going to have a lot of remediation to do later.  In the spelling program we use, we do not allow the child to misspell a word.  We make sure they already know how to spell it and why it is spelled that way before they write it.  

 

I once made the mistake of pointing out a homonym to word in my dd's spelling list.  The program said not to do this, but she was good speller, and I thought it would be interesting to her.  She ended up spelling it the wrong way for what seemed like forever.  It took months to get the wrong spelling out of her head.  But when I teach her the way the program is written, she does very well.  

 

Tracy, thank you for this response!     

 

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I just looked at the site, and I would never, ever use that program.  

 

From the site: "In the phonetic stage, most instruction involves helping children match individual sounds in words to their corresponding letters, usually starting with their own names. They often use all capital letters and spell words incorrectly. For example, they may spell KAT for catMI for myLUV for love, and U for you. Silent letters in words like bake or lamb may be omitted. Instructors welcome these spellings as an indication that the student is beginning to understand sound-to-letter correspondence."

 

I am a big believer in the philosophy that what you learn first is what you learn best.  If you, as the teacher, welcome phonetic misspellings, then you are going to have a lot of remediation to do later.  In the spelling program we use, we do not allow the child to misspell a word.  We make sure they already know how to spell it and why it is spelled that way before they write it.  

 

I guess I agree with you to some extent, I think once a child is reading/writing fluently their spelling should be corrected, but it looks like they're only promoting creative spelling at the very beginning of the process, when kids are just learning to associate letters with phonemes. It's been a month since I looked at the website, but if I'm remembering correctly the program seems to lead kids through all the stages, from creative spelling as a start, through to correct spelling. I think that can actually be helpful in the long run because it fosters phonemic awareness.

 

(My DD4 is a creative speller and I'm letting her run with it, because I think teaching spelling at this young an age will be discouraging to her and take away from the creative process. Last week she wrote a story called "The Majic Meebol" (The Magic Meatball.) If I'd stopped at that point to correct the spelling, I doubt she would have written anything more. I think the creative spelling is helping both her reading and her writing.)

 

ETA: Just looked through samples, and at least for the early lessons it actually looks like a typical spelling program minus spelling lists...Lots of copywork, and guidance to write simple words. They don't seem to be promoting creative spelling. (Unless I'm missing something, other than the use of nursery rhymes for copywork, the first two levels actually doesn't look much different from the $5.00 workbooks you can pick up at Walmart.)

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[T]he program seems to lead kids through all the stages, from creative spelling as a start, through to correct spelling. I think that can actually be helpful in the long run because it fosters phenomic awareness.

 

 

There are lots of ways that one can foster phonemic awareness without encouraging wrong spelling that will require future remediation. My ds learned the phonograms from the time he was 2yo.  We played games where he would have to orally sound out a word.  By the time he was writing, he already knew that the sound /k/ could be spelled a few different ways.  We started formal spelling in a salt box at 4yo.  When he wrote a word like "cat," for example, he would sound it out orally, and I would then tell him before he wrote it that the /k/ sound was a C.  

 

Having been through this now with 2 kids, I can tell you that it is not worth the trouble to allow wrong spelling.  The minute my dd9 writes a word incorrectly, it is stuck in her head for who knows how long.  Phonemic awareness is important, but certainly not more important than their spelling.  

 

ETA:  I don't correct spelling in my dc's free time stuff.  I am only talking about formal spelling study.  I agree that you don't want to discourage creativity.

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