Jump to content

Menu

Late talker and early reading instruction


Recommended Posts

I wrote about this in another thread but on reflection, I think I should post separately.  Here is my question:

 

My 3 1/2 year old son was late in talking.  He had single words at about 2 1/2 but now speaks in complete sentences.  He has trouble saying certain consonant sounds and often drops off the beginning consonant sounds of words.

 

My question is, how does this affect early reading instruction?  I would like to teach him his letters and sounds next school year (he knows his colors, shapes, can count 1-2-3) but is that even a good idea if he still struggles with making sounds in everyday speech?  A speech therapist gave me a list of sounds he should be making by age/gender norms according to the Iowa scale (?).  He is okay there but on the later end of the spectrum.  He struggles making sounds like /f/, /s/....  His speech is sing songy in that he makes lots of vowel sounds but leaves off key consonants.  We can almost always understand him (tho' there are times we cannot) but outside of our family, people do not always. 

 

I have used LOE and Foundations with my older three and those have been so helpful in teaching me how to teach him to physically make the sounds with his mouth.  My other children had no issues in learning to talk.  With this child, I had to make a point of having him look at me when I spoke so I could teach him how to make certain sounds. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

DD 10, didn't really talk until she was 3+, even after that her brother had to translate for us.  She started reading in Pre-K and by 1st grade was reading at least a couple of grades ahead.  I think reading helped her work on her articulation/pronounciation (reading aloud especially).  We never saw a therapist, just me working with her the best I could.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One of mine was a late talker who was left with some difficulties with sounds.  He asked to learn to read when he was 4 1/2, having not previously mastered his individual letter sounds through continual exposure.  He learned fast and was reading far above grade level within a year or so.

 

L

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My son (2.5) has been a late talker. He is easier (for us) to understand now and uses more complete (still not very grammatical) sentences, but still leaves off consonant sounds or replaces them with other consonants.

 

He has apparently been listening as his sister was learning to read, though, because the boy knows most of his alphabet. He can't say all the sounds, but he knows what they are and 'corrects' you if you say them wrong. As someone mentioned before, I think it is helping / will help him with his own sounds.

 

He can also count and knows his colors and some shapes, if you can understand what he's saying. I'm not going to sit down and teach him to read at this point, but on the whole I will not be at all surprised if he ends up being the earlier reader - and maybe overall the more academically minded - of our children.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dd6 was a late talker. Her reading progress has been kind of a "2 steps forward, 1 step back" for awhile now, even though the pre-reading skills came easily for her (she recognized all letters before age 2 just from playing with an alphabet puzzle, for example).

 

What I've discovered is that shortcuts do not work for her. We went through the same book that dd8 used, and it did not launch her into reading. Ordinary Parent's Guide is working for her finally, though it is tedious and snail-paced and she dreads it. It does a great job of addressing every single consonant and vowel combination possible in English.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It completely depends on the reason for the speech delay.  If it is a straight speech delay with no other underlying issues, then it should not affect schooling.  But if the delay is due to a processing disorder, for example, then that processing disorder is always going to be lurking.  

 

My ds had a speech delay that was mostly just a delay.  Although he didn't have a full-blown auditory processing disorder, he did have an auditory processing weakness which made it difficult for him to distinguish similar sounds (d/t, f/v, b/p, ch/j, etc.).  So our speech therapist gave us some ways to practice distinguishing those sounds.  If he hadn't had that practice, then learning the phonograms in a spelling program like LOE would have been that much more difficult.  

 

The fact that he has difficulty saying F and S is developmentally expected.  Leaving off ending consonants is not developmentally expected, but it is a common problem that speech therapy can address quite easily.  A rule of thumb is that the parents should be able to understand a 3yo almost all of the time, and strangers should be able to understand him about 75% of the time.  http://www.speech-language-therapy.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=29:admin&catid=11:admin&Itemid=117

 

If you are concerned, an evaluation is generally free through the school district or through your state's early intervention program, depending on your child's age.

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Youngest DS was a late talker diagnosed with verbal apraxia (his was mild, but it's still a rather serious speech issue).  And yet with little to no help from me he was a very early and very fluent reader.  One day when he was four we were on the way home from speech therapy and he started reading road signs.  And they weren't easy names.  He was reading beginner chapter books in preschool.  After he started kindergarten (public school), his teacher asked for permission for one of the upper elementary grade teachers to test his reading level.  She told me it was at least middle school (apparently that was as far as the test they used went).  I'm not sure if that helps you any, but I just wanted to point out that not all kids with speech issues have trouble learning to read.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My oldest was a late talker. Mostly due to Asperger's (although they dx'ed him PDD-NOS at that time) but I still read aloud and worked on sounds with him even though he didn't say a whole lot. I could make a letter sound and he could point or hand me the letter magnet that made that sound.

 

It didn't effect his learning to read however. The first longish thing he ever said was at 2.5 and he said the alphabet to me. 

 

With time, patience and  supplements (we were not able to get him into speech until he was 4--long story there mainly due to a very annoying pede!) he started talking and even reading a bit. I focused on handwriting, which was one thing he could do. 

 

Around 3 he started sounding out simple CVC words, could handwrite all his letters, and was always interested in hearing stacks of books read to him. He started to read more at 4-5..never did finish an ETC book or a phonics primer. He's a voracious reader now. Although he is still quiet and there's still some sounds he struggles with verbally.

 

Compare that to my 6 year old who has never been quiet!!! And had a bit of a precocious vocab when younger. He isn't progressing in the same way with his reading or spelling. It's a downright chore tbh. 

 

My 3 year old dd is also pretty verbally precocious and seems like she'll follow her older brother in being a quick study.

 

I think it all depends on learning style. There are so many factors to consider. I wouldn't necessarily expect a speech delay to cause a reading delay however. 

 

In fact I feel the more exposure to language, the better! ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It is not uncommon for children with speech delays to also be late readers, so don't completely freak out if reading is difficult (and it may go very easy for your child - you just never know what your own child will do!).

 

That said, learning letter sounds and beginning reading was VERY helpful for my son's speech. The visual connection to what he was saying made all the difference. He's my latest reading child (didn't start reading easy readers until after he turned 7, whereas the other two were reading 2nd grade level picture books before they turned 5), and it's been a long, slow process, but I'm glad I taught him letter sounds early on so we could work on the speech and understand him!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I thought the very same thing with my dd when she was 3-4ish,I figured if I could teach her to read it would help with her speech. I used Ordinary Parents Guide but it didn't work for her. She didn't have enough sounds or the ability to remember letter sounds that she could not say. It wasn't for lack of reading aloud to her goodness knows, we did 2+ hours nearly everyday (but I loved that) and gave up teaching her to read for a while. I started her with Phonics Road at 5.5. It was arduous for both of us but the rules and focus on drill finally started to work. She is still a slow reader but at grade level. Her speech issues were severe though and for a while we thought she may not overcome them. With so many parents of early readers responding, I didn't want you to think that was everyone's story.

I really, really recommend getting him evaluated. I took some bad advice from a very respected speech specialist that said my daughter would normalize on her own and therapy could be detrimental. It is amazing what a difference a good therapist can make.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This might not happen since obviously most people responded that their littles ones did fine. My ds with a moderate articulation issue is struggling to learn to read although I do think that a lot of what I did with him helped his speech especially phonograms. On the checklists for dyslexia speech and handwriting is mentioned for some kids that have those issues it could show up as issues with reading down the road. He also has a delay in handwriting. Based on the things ds does and how he thinks I think something like that is going on with him mildly. He loves listening to reading and has excellent comprehension. He is very perceptive in many ways but learning to read is not something that he just picked up easily.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have had four (out of five!) late talkers with my ds#2 being the latest of them all. My older boy's speech has definitely been helped by his learning-to-read journey. My late talkers have also been late-to-read but working on sounds is helpful.

 

On another front, I love the resources available on the Mommy Speech Blog for working with your kid on speech issues at home.  :001_tt1:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My oldest had speech therapy starting when he was two. He headed into school in the 3rd percentile for his expressive speech and even lower for his receptive speech. learning to read didn't happen at school because there was too much going on and he constantly felt like an idiot and just shut down. When I brought him home, the more I taught him, the better his speech became. It was like learning to speak all over again because now he could see the words and figure out how they were really supposed to sound. My dd is a fast talker and always left out sounds. As she has learned to read, her speech has become clearer. My youngest talks SUPER slow and very few people understood him in Preschool, but he was reading words when he was 2 1/2.

 

My little brothers both have speech problems and still sound like they have an accent, but they read really well. They had to do a little more hands on to learn to read though.

 

 

Expect the reading to come a little slower. Take it easy so it's not frustrating. It shouldn't stop him from learning to read at all though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...