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GRR! Annoyed with finding Early American History curriculum!


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I'm needing an early American (colonial/Revolution) history for grades 3-5th ish. 

 

I'm becoming ridiculously annoyed because I can't find what I need. I've figured out, along the way, that if I have to put homeschool items together (gather supplies, search down random books, etc) it does not happen. I homeschool and run a business + have ADD/ridiculously short attention span, and I just am not that type of homeschooler. 

 

For this reason, we have yet to tackle history....AND I WANT FOR THIS TO CHANGE. 

 

I need workbooks. I need it laid out for me. I'm looking at Guest Hollow's history program and it looks so good...but I want to just cry out of frustration. I'm the type of person who cannot photocopy pages every day, or print out as we go along. It has to be completely put together before we tackle one page. 

 

HOW do I go about this? If I HAVE to put it together...how do I do this? I want for my children to love history as much as I do.

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my daughter will be in 1st next year but loves history and I did not like the American History options for her. So I am putting my own together after much fighting the notion. 

 

What I did was find a spine I liked that we can follow like SOTW, (b/c my daughter loves that style) and then I added a mapping portion and then a collection of read alouds. I may pick an activity to throw in there here and there, but I am not going to feel obligated because she loves reading and doesn't care if we don't do the hands on, so sometimes it's not worth the extra effort.

 

Over the summer I will literally type up what books go with what chapter, etc., so that when it comes time to do it, it's open and go like a "regular" curriculum. I also put together a "workbook" if needed where everything is already printed up and put in order and bound (thanks proclick!). It's a lot of work over the summer but then the school year goes really well and I just have to keep up with where I am in my plans. 

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I couldn't find anything I liked for American History either (and believe me, I bought & returned/resold several popular programs).

 

I finally just decided to put together our American History for next year.  I used The Complete Book of US History as a spine, and we'll just do the first 5 units (Early Americans, European Explorers, Colonial America, Revolution, Westward Expansion).  

 

I basically made a list of picture books and read-alouds that I wanted to read for each unit (used Sonlight/MFW/HOD as references for the books, then went ahead and purchased them all used, about an $80 investment).  I spent a few days on Pinterest and came up with a few hands-on projects/coloring sheets per unit -- and went ahead and printed them all out and filed them in order.

It took me about a month to put it all together, 1-2 hours a week (I used the 5 weeks that my girls were in a homeschool P.E. class to work on it).  Now I have no excuse NOT to do it next year, LOL.  It's all laid out and ready to go. :)

 

ETA:  Scholastic Dollar Deals has several hands-on history type books in their $1 sale.  I think I ended up buying 4-5 of them and then I picked and choose what I wanted to do.  For $1 each, it wasn't a bad price -- especially if you feel drawn to Homeschool in the Woods type programs (I think these look a lot like those cool paper projects that program has.)

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So print the whole thing up front, 3-hole punch it and put it in a binder with divider tabs. This is why I spend *my* summers reading and preparing our curricula for the next school year. I get deeply familiar with the material, all copies get made and organized, any needed by-subject lesson plans get written, and I'll add any extra books to the shopping list. By the time fall rolls around everything is open and go.

Edited by SilverMoon
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So print the whole thing up front, 3-hole punch it and put it in a binder with divider tabs. This is why I spend *my* summers reading and preparing our curricula for the next school year. I get deeply familiar with the material, all copies get made and organized, any needed by-subject lesson plans get written, and I'll add any extra books to the shopping list. By the time fall rolls around everything is open and go.

 

Otherwise, Beautiful Feet has some handy history guides that tell you up front what you need to complete them.

 

I need to do this-- I just wish there was a way to have the "read alouds" in the binder already so that I don't have to go through the books for them. (Sometimes, for me to get things done, I have to make it as simple as humanly possible.)

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I don't know if these will be more helpful but I'm throwing them out there. 

 

Book lists organized by Historical Era.
http://www.redshift.com/~bonajo/history.htm

 

Magazine (no advertisements in them) for History-single issues and bundles available.

http://www.learningthroughhistory.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=H&Product_Code=US-06

 

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I was so tied up in knots over creating the Perfect History Experience for my kids, that it rarely got done :(  What has worked surprisingly well is reading a short section from What Your ____ Grader Needs to Know (3rd/4th grade has American history topics) and then watching an episode of Liberty's Kids.  We watch LK together, I clear up any areas of confusion and point out things I think are important (e.g. when Thomas Jefferson was introduced, I told them to pay attention to him, because he's really important).  The kids are retaining a lot, we've had some good discussions and history is actually getting done.  

 

I really think you need to give yourself permission to do history in a way that is very simple and just "okay."   A simple history program is superior to a "superior" program that never gets done. :)

 

Good luck.  :grouphug:

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Well that 4th/5th grade age has a real lack of good options, imho.  I like the redacted edition of Guerber that MP is selling (which has a workbook btw!), but beyond that...  Well the Story of the US series (4 workbooks) SL sells isn't too bad but it's not age-appropriate for a 3rd grader.  How old is the dc?  Reading level?  

 

Personally, I gave up on teaching and put my dd in the VP self-paced online history and walked away.  That's what I recommend.  :D

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