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Do you have or will you get GeoThermal?


1GirlTwinBoys
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Yes, I'm still on this subject. :confused1:​  I thought I fixed my AC earlier but I didn't.  Fortunately, it was only $258 and considering my unit is 17 years old, I was happy with that. :001_smile:

 

I'd like to know which type of system to go with though when I do need to replace ours. Just curious for those of you that have this type of system if you're happy with it?

 

 

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We had a geothermal system put in when we built our home 12 years ago.  They no longer install them in our area (too much rock not enough dirt so ground not as good of an insulator as thought). 

 

We did have significant energy savings for the first 5 years-- then the system developed an issue.  It was less than half the price (for repair) to just go with a dual air (air pump) system that was very energy efficient. 

 

Great concept-- but make sure to research if it is a good system for your ground type.

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We have geothermal but I cannot tell you what the savings are because we did a major renovation and our whole house is different from an insulation standpoint.

Plus, our electric company has lower rates than the people around the corner who are with a different company.

That said, I know several people who have geothermal and not all systems are alike.  Ours was very expensive but there were energy savings we could deduct from taxes so that helped.  And, we had to have enough yard space to put the loop--another consideration.  Your yard will be torn up.

We have had no trouble with ours, but for awhile some friends of ours had their fan go out every year.

Our only other practical option would have been an efficient propane system.  It's nice not having to worry about the tank having enough fuel in it, especially when propane prices went above $5.00 per gallon this winter.  Still, neighbors on all electric saw bills of $750 per month....

 

I guess, what I am saying, is that there are lots of things for you to consider!

 

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I think part of the savings depends on what you have now. We had propane and the geothermal has saved us tons, my parents had oil and they've saved quite a bit too.

 

Our electric coop had incentives and those along with the energy tax credit thing (sorry, totally blanking on the name) made it the same or a bit cheaper than a comparable conventional furnace.

 

We are able to keep our house more comfortable and still pay less, but our furnace was older and not that efficient. Good luck

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Geo thermal is very expensive, but in northern climes it can be a savings over the life of the system and is much more environmentally friendly. We have friends that put in a geothermal system. it cost them about $12,000.00 and they've put $500.00 into maintenance at one point. The house is 16 years old, and a typical heating bill on propane (we don't have natural gas in this area) is about $2150.00 for a home their size with all of the insulation they put in, higher for older homes with many families paying $500.00 a month for heat if they aren't low enough income to get utilities assistance. Air Conditioning runs about $600.00 for a season. So in 16 years they would have spent approximately $44,000 on heat and air. They average about $69.00 a month in the winter in electricity to run the system and $35.00 a month in the summer for the air or $9408.00 over 16 years. So, the total cost of the system and utilities consumed to run it is less than half what they would have paid with the traditional utilities available in the area.

 

But, I think that in more temperate climates where the heating season is much shorter and the cold not so intense and prolonged, then it would be entirely possible to only break even or maybe even lose money. Of course, some would choose this anyway in order to not have their heating dependent on oil. As we saw this year, when winters gets really extreme and demand is high, the costs can skyrocket and in our area propane was even rationed. Some people had to turn their thermostats down to 50 or 55 degrees and were severely cold in their homes with the winds howling, while those with alternative heating sources were toasty warm. Due to the high air quality we have in this area, wood heating from an exterior boiler with radiant floor heat is what we chose. We spend about $1200.00 a year on wood when we don't harvest it and split it ourselves. This house would cost $4000.00 a year to heat on propane due to the size and nature of the building (renovated 100+ year old church). We keep a propane tank for back up, but only need to use it when we travel. I was thankful that when propane was being rationed, not only did we not need any and that propane could go to someone else.

 

Oh, we also use solar panels to run the electronics on our wood system as well as well pump. So, our heating is essentially "off grid" so to speak.

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