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Do you consider your gifted child 2e if they have SPD?


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Just curious. I never would personally, because I don't see SPD as a learning disability-exceptionallity. I just saw in another location someone describing their DC as being 2e when the second e was a diagnosis of SPD. Personally I would only label 2e those things which really hinder learning. SPD can hinder learning, but just as much as being too perfectionist can, or any other personality trait. Just wondering the hives opinion on this rainy (here at least) day. 

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AFAIK, most, if not all, processing issues would fall under the big umbrella of SPD.  Some processing issues may be part of an actual DSM diagnosis, while others may not.  I'm not aware of how closely psychs draw the line in defining 2e.

Edited by wapiti
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Just curious. I never would personally, because I don't see SPD as a learning disability-exceptionallity. I just saw in another location someone describing their DC as being 2e when the second e was a diagnosis of SPD. Personally I would only label 2e those things which really hinder learning. SPD can hinder learning, but just as much as being too perfectionist can, or any other personality trait. Just wondering the hives opinion on this rainy (here at least) day. 

 

Hmm... things that "really hinder learning" vs "personality traits". So ADHD might qualify but a more severe diagnosis of ODD is a moral failing. SPD is just quirks while a full blown ASD diagnosis is legit(or maybe for not for Aspergers?). Bipolar isn't educational so we'll just ignore it for the time being. Read some of 8's posts about her aspie child. He never had any "learning" problems but his ASD has had a profound effect on his life outcomes.

 

I understand your point. Kids have quirks. Not every quirky kid is special needs. Not every quirky gifted kid is 2e. However "simple" diagnoses like SPD or anxiety can be just as life affecting for some kids. Maybe you can manage it in homeschool setting but in a B&M school SPD can be crippling. Regardless, I would be inclined to respect the parents opinions. There is such a societal stigma that I assume most parents aren't trying to game the system but really have challenges and are looking for outside support.

 

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If the SPD is severe enough to interfere with the child's learning, then yes, I'd consider the child 2E. SPD is a continuumn from relatively mild (I think I have it as certain colors and visual patterns hurt my eyes) to moderate (my ASD child is a sensory seeker and a lot of the hyperactivity is actually her trying to get sensory stimulation) to severe.

 

I don't think it's a contest to see whose kid has more issues.

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In a classroom setting, my DD definitely has a more difficult time because of her sensory issues. At home, when it's just her, it's much less an issue, but the SPD stuff was as much a reason for pulling her in the first place as the GT-because they might have been able to put her on EPGY in the back of the room or send her to a higher grade level and give her higher level content, but they couldn't get rid of the sounds, visual overload, and especially the smells of a classroom full of kids in a school full of kids.

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 Maybe you can manage it in homeschool setting but in a B&M school SPD can be crippling.

 

This.

 

We pulled DS from school because of his sensory issues. He would have needed a full time aide to have remained in the classroom and even then I don't think he would have coped well.

 

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This is all interesting and had given me a new perspective. Thanks! I guess since we have always homeschooled I have never had to deal with the SPD in a school setting, so never saw it as a huge deal. I see it a just a minor quirk that is usually easy to deal with. I don't know how ds's sensory issues are compared to other's, but most days, I'd guess he only deals with mild SPD. But that might be only because we have our controlled environment around us.

Thanks for enlightening me!

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This is all interesting and had given me a new perspective. Thanks! I guess since we have always homeschooled I have never had to deal with the SPD in a school setting, so never saw it as a huge deal. I see it a just a minor quirk that is usually easy to deal with. I don't know how ds's sensory issues are compared to other's, but most days, I'd guess he only deals with mild SPD. But that might be only because we have our controlled environment around us.

Thanks for enlightening me!

 

Not only would there be widely-varying levels of severity, but SPD includes many different types of issues, including motor stuff, auditory and visual processing, etc., which directly affect learning input and output. http://www.spdfoundation.net/images/spdchartgif

 

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I agree with much of what has been said, but wanted to share our experience.

 

After 4 years of trying to manage a B&M classroom, we brought my DS home. His SPD is severe across every category. Our pediatrician described it as a mile wide and a yard deep, instead of an inch.

 

Our choice to HS came during our grade four IEP meeting. Recommendations from his OT (a sensory specialist), counselor and paper work from the Psych-Ed were brought together into a single document for the meeting. There were 34 adaptations required to give him a reasonable chance of success. We all looked at each other, teacher and principal included, and realized that it was not going to happen. He had no funding and no TA time.

 

There is no recognition of or funding for SPD where I live, no matter how much it affects my son's life. His daily challenges go far past quirks or personality traits. They are truly a disability, even though they are largely "invisible". He has many tools in his tools box after years of counseling and cognitive therapy to help him cope. We do lots of big things like OT and now homeschooling, but we also do dozens of little things everyday to help him regulate. He has learned to recognize what is happening when his "Super Senses" are being overtaxed.

 

He is seeing many of his challenges in a positive light now as well. We talk about how he could be a code breaker or a spy someday, because he is taking in more visual information that most people. Or how he can hear the nuances in classical music and pick out specific instruments from the orchestra because of his Spiderman hearing. We read books on philosophy because he can't help but ponder the world because he sees more, hears more, feels more. Everything is just MORE. Tears stream down his faces as he watches a sunset, overwhelmed by it’s beauty. He is disturbed by the sexual exploitation of women in North America and tries to understand why as a society we consumers would support goods and services that are so demeaning to women. He is nine.

 

SPD permeates every second of every day. He has come a long way since the diagnosis, and it’s hard not to weep when I think of how bravely he meets the world each day.

 

Here is a wonderful video that gives a glimpse into what the world feels like for someone with SPD. It was created as an Autism awareness piece. Most people with Autism have sensory issues even if they aren’t diagnosed with SPD, but not all with SPD are Autistic.

 

http://vimeo.com/52193530

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