Jump to content

Menu

AP Classes For Credit - Not Sure How This Works


Recommended Posts

I plan to have my daughter, at minimum, biology, chemistry, and physics in high school.  The tentative plan is to also do AP Bio and AP chemistry sometime after the biology and chemistry courses.  I understand that each of the high school science classes gets 1 high school science credit each, but what do I do with the AP classes?  Are they also 1 high school credit each, or no high school credit and just "saved" for college credit?  If they are worth high school credit along with the biology and chemistry, is that considered "double-dipping'" credit-wise? 

 

Also, most people I know take the sciences as a high school course, followed up by the AP course.  But it seems most people I know just take APUSH or AP Calculus or AP whatever other class with no previous high school course.  Is this correct?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

An AP course would satisfy the requirements for one high school credit.

 

College credit is not granted for the AP course, but only for a high enough score on the AP exam, and not at every institution.

 

If your student takes several different courses of different levels in the same science, it is not double-dipping to award credit for each, since it would not be an identical course.

My DD graduates with four physics credits ;-)

 

For some subjects, it is not customary to take a course before the AP, like calculus for example. I have not heard of anybody taking "calculus" and then follow with "AP calculus". OTOH, for some science courses, a previous non-AP course can be highly beneficial and may be required if the student is at a b&m school, for example in chemistry.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's fine to have regular chemistry and then AP chemistry. That's the way that it works in most schools.

 

Your understanding about science APs vs. history/math APs is correct. Science APs are quite difficult and would be even more so without a previous study.

 

My daughter took AP Biology as her first formal biology course, and it was lots of work for her. But she is quick, and had a special interest in biology so that she went in with a lot of previous knowledge even though she hadn't studied it formally. I wouldn't recommend this to most students, though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There are some really valuable discussions of AP courses in the pinned thread at the top of the board.

 

AP courses are college level courses taught in high school. Students get a course grade that goes on their transcript. They also take an exam given on the same date nationally in May. (IE all students of AP physics take the same exam).

 

Colleges can grant college credit for AP scores. Each college sets their own credit policy. What is granted may vary depending on the Ap exam score, the course, and the student's college major.

 

For homeschoers, in addition to the possibility of college credit it can be a good way to demonstrate rigorous work with an outside evaluation.

 

There are some catches. College Board owns the rights to the term Advanced Placement. So this can only be on the transcript if the syllabus was approved by College Board. It is possible to do this as a homeschooler. I had two syllabi approved this year and others on the board have also. Other people take the tactic of listing the course as "physics with AP test" and including the exam score on the transcript.

 

It's not uncommon for students to take an AP level science when they had done the high school level earlier. Others reach the level where they are doing AP science in 10th or 11th grade and then stick with AP level even for content that is new.

 

In other courses there is a progression like Spanish 4 then AP Spanish. In courses like English and history it is common for students to take AP level courses once they reach a certain skill level. For history the AP class is the first time for that content in high school.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's not uncommon for students to take an AP level science when they had done the high school level earlier. Others reach the level where they are doing AP science in 10th or 11th grade and then stick with AP level even for content that is new.

 

This is true.  My ds did Apologia Biology in 7th grade, and Apologia Chemistry in 8th grade.  In 9th grade he took AP Chemistry (I definately would not recommend taking this class without a regular high school chemistry course first).  However, ds is currently taking AP Physics B and is doing very well in the class (AP test is monday :001_smile: ) with no prior physics background.  If your child is strong in math, physics shouldn't be too much of an issue.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And a course is not truly an AP course unless the teacher has an approved syllabus with the College Board.

 

My second one will probably do AP English with me in 2015-2016, but I'm not going to bother with an approved syllabus.  I'll teach her the AP content, and then she'll take the exam.  If she does well, that will be a year of high school English plus both semesters of freshman English done.  And you can retake an AP as long as you are still in high school. 

 

Double-dipping is fine credit-wise, but it depends on where they go to college.  Mine will be going to an "upper middle" state college that they can commute to, and they accept selected AP's for credit.

 

Here's a good summary: http://www.hercampus.com/high-school/applying-college/5-things-you-need-know-about-ap-exams

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

Also, most people I know take the sciences as a high school course, followed up by the AP course.  But it seems most people I know just take APUSH or AP Calculus or AP whatever other class with no previous high school course.  Is this correct?

 

I think it depends on the student, their aptitudes, interests, and their background.  Our oldest daughter took AP biology as a freshman, then AP Chemistry, and AP Physics in subsequent years.  Technically these were her first formal courses in these areas but she had been exposed to a lot informally first in classical school that went wide and deep with their advanced science students.  We had also covered some topics at home because DH and I had the background to do so and she had the interest to explore.  She did very well on all of her AP exams even without taking prior courses.  She had taken the AP environmental sciences and AP latin exams prior to starting her freshman year so she had some exposure to the AP exam concept which some people feel is important.  Personally I didn't really see the need for that and we had her take the exams in eighth grade because we felt she was ready then not really as "a dry run".

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I plan to have my daughter, at minimum, biology, chemistry, and physics in high school.  The tentative plan is to also do AP Bio and AP chemistry sometime after the biology and chemistry courses.  I understand that each of the high school science classes gets 1 high school science credit each, but what do I do with the AP classes?  Are they also 1 high school credit each, or no high school credit and just "saved" for college credit?  If they are worth high school credit along with the biology and chemistry, is that considered "double-dipping'" credit-wise? 

 

Also, most people I know take the sciences as a high school course, followed up by the AP course.  But it seems most people I know just take APUSH or AP Calculus or AP whatever other class with no previous high school course.  Is this correct?

 

You've had lots of great advice above.

 

There seem to be a couple things you are confusing in your post above.

 

An AP class is a 1/2 or 1 credit class depending on the class and time spent.  For example AP chemistry is typically a 1 credit, year long, course while AP US Government is often a 1/2 credit 1 semester course.

 

You cannot save the credit gained by taking an AP course for college.  It is not a college course, it is a high school courses intended to be conducted at a skill level equivalent to an introductory freshman college course.  As homeschoolers we can't grant college credit.  If your student gains any college credit it would be through the exam and resulting score.  This is highly variable as described by previous posters.

 

As a homeschooler no AP class has a prerequisite.  If you want your child's only chemistry course to be AP chemistry that can happen.  Many online AP course providers and b&m schools have prerequisites for AP classes or a sequence of courses designed to lead to a particular AP.  Many students will take a typical bio or chem course and then the AP version in a later year.  Math is typically sequenced with algebra 1 & 2, geometry, and precalc/trig coming ahead of AP calculus AB and then AP calc BC.   A social studies or lit AP may come after a sequence of challenging or honors courses in previous years.  AP language courses obviously come after a several year preparatory sequence that culminates in the AP class/exam. 

 

It is always worth repeating-College Board owns the AP tag.  You cannot call a course "AP Chemistry" or "AP Calculus" on your transcript unless you (the teacher) have submitted to the AP audit and be granted approval to use the AP designation or the provider you have used (ie PA Homeschoolers, Lukeion Project, Johns Hopkins CTY, Kolbe, and a host of others that homeschoolers often use) has applied for and received permission to use the designation.  Taking a course at a community college does not entitle use of the AP designation either.  That said you can also take the exam without having the AP designation on the transcript.  I believe that process was also outlined earlier.

 

I hope that helps clarify things.  The high school transcript is tricky thing to navigate.  I'm hoping I can master it before it needs to be sent somewhere. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Be aware that  AP Physics B (algebra based) usually does not get college credit for STEM majors such as Engineering.  But it is certainly worth studying to prepare for the actual calculus based Physics course in college.

Many high schools only offer the  AP Physics B class and exam (which is being divided into separate tests in the future, I believe).

 

AP Chemistry may be similar.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Be aware that AP Physics B (algebra based) usually does not get college credit for STEM majors such as Engineering. But it is certainly worth studying to prepare for the actual calculus based Physics course in college.

Many high schools only offer the AP Physics B class and exam (which is being divided into separate tests in the future, I believe).

 

AP Chemistry may be similar.

Beware that the whole AP Physics sequence has completely changed and there will be no AP Physics B anymore.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sigh, my son is enrolled in AP Human Geography for next year.  Now Uncle Sam is making noises that we will be transferred to Japan in March next year.  The exam is on 5/15; I really hope I can work this out or he will have an AP class with no exam.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sigh, my son is enrolled in AP Human Geography for next year. Now Uncle Sam is making noises that we will be transferred to Japan in March next year. The exam is on 5/15; I really hope I can work this out or he will have an AP class with no exam.

That is what I had to deal with this year. I had to cold call schools in CA until I found a couple that would take us. I started at the end of Jan and it was a long process as I'd leave a msg and wait for contact back.

 

The good news is that DODEA schools do offer many exams. I would call them as soon as you have orders to try to set it up. Use the base school liaison officer if you need to.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Sebastian, that is good to hear. If all goes well we should have orders by late summer/early fall.

Fwiw although our last pcs was VA to CA, we did a two year stint in Yokosuka. I know a few homeschoolers who are still there if you need info on groups and activities. We had a great time. It had a small town feel and we felt very connected with other families in and out of homeschooling.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sigh, my son is enrolled in AP Human Geography for next year.  Now Uncle Sam is making noises that we will be transferred to Japan in March next year.  The exam is on 5/15; I really hope I can work this out or he will have an AP class with no exam.

 

You might want to check with any international schools in the area as well.  I think that the AP website has a list of who had the course this year and should post next year sometime over the summer if not already.

 

Be sure to ask if the base school or international school is willing to order and proctor the exam for you even if they don't have the class.  Some will-some won't.  That may involve paying both an international testing fee (charged by College Board) and a proctoring fee...

 

Start earlier rather than later-it can take a while to arrange these tests. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

LOL, we came from CA to VA last year and if all goes well we go to Yokosuka next. I would very much appreciate any info on homeschooling, groups and activities there.

I found this course listing for Kinnick HS for this year. Doesn't look like Human Geography is offered. http://www.kinnick-hs.pac.dodea.edu/documents/Kinnick%20Program%20of%20Studies%202013-2014%20Public.pdf

 

You might be able to get them to order and give the test anyway. I don't know if they've started doing that with AP courses offered through the DODEA distance learning online option. This would be something to start ironing out well in advance.

 

Also it's pretty common for families to delay their move until several weeks or a few months after the active duty person reports. You end up higher on the housing list and have fewer school disruptions.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...