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Math Req. for Texas: Help Please


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We have been rocking along for nearly 8 years now. My daughter has been slow to develop in the area of math. As a result, she has never quiet caught up. She is finishing her 10th grade year and just now finishing Pre-Algebra. I wouldn't change anything, as she is now starting to "get it"; catching up has not been an option. Problem: It doesn't *look* like pre-algebra is an acceptable high school credit for the state of Texas. I hesitate to ask someone from the state about this, for fear of making homeschooling look bad for having a 10th grader just finishing pre-algebra. Does anyone know the math requirements for graduation? 

 

TIA

 

Jamie R.

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In Texas, private schools can make their graduation requirements whatever they want. Home schools are private schools.

 

IF you are asking what the public schools require, so you can match, the graduation requirements recently changed to omit Algebra 2. And, there are different levels of diplomas. In addition to that, you need to more or less look at what your child plans to do after graduation. Your child does not need a specific diploma for community college. I would just work slow and steady to make sure she really has things down. Maybe do the sequence of algebra 1 followed by algebra 2 so she is good and ready for college algebra at the community college. If she misses geometry, it won't be the end of the world.

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That is so encouraging! Thank you. (I was panicking a bit). 

 

OK, so where does the diploma come from? Does there need to be an official diploma from the state? I have heard HSLDA can issue a diploma, but I wonder if we as parents come up with that too??

 

As you can see, she is my oldest. ;) All new territory for me.

 

I will add that Jr. College is the plan right out of high school. So there doesn't need to be a diploma? Probably at least a transcript though? Funny, in all my education I NEVER even remember my high school diploma. Don't remember if I even got one as a homeschooler, but managed to do a LOT of education after hs. …and here I am worrying about this. 

 

P.S. I see my sig line is extremely out of date. DD is now 16!

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I believe Pre Algebra is normally taken in 8th grade in Texas Public Schools. However, many students take it in 7th grade. My DD is very strong in Math (it is her easiest subject) and she probably could have taken Pre Algebra, now, in 7th grade, but then she would have taken Algebra 1 in 8th grade and there is an EOC examination in Texas (End of Course exam) for Public School students, for Algebra 1, which must be taken in 9th grade. So, DD is taking the regular sequence and she will  be current in Algebra 1 when she takes the EOC exam for that course.

 

In your case, as a Home Schooler, I believe that you will create your own transcript and create your own diploma. It sounds like you are on the right path, planning on a community college, after high school graduation and hopefully she will have Algebra 1 and also Algebra 2 or Geometry 1 completed, by the time she graduates from your home school. If were planning to take the SAT and/or ACT and go directly into a university, this would probably be much more of an issue, but for community college I think she will be OK.   GL

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Not from Texas and probably shouldn't be offering advice...

 

Our community colleges vary on their requirements in Tn. Check with the specific school she will be attending to find out their requirements. The one near us requires a high school diploma for attendance. You will need to find out, but I'm guessing that as homeschooling parent you just issue your own and provide your transcript. Other CC here just require test scores for placement and let dc admit with just those. 

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That is so encouraging! Thank you. (I was panicking a bit). 

 

OK, so where does the diploma come from? Does there need to be an official diploma from the state? I have heard HSLDA can issue a diploma, but I wonder if we as parents come up with that too??

 

As you can see, she is my oldest. ;) All new territory for me.

 

I will add that Jr. College is the plan right out of high school. So there doesn't need to be a diploma? Probably at least a transcript though? Funny, in all my education I NEVER even remember my high school diploma. Don't remember if I even got one as a homeschooler, but managed to do a LOT of education after hs. …and here I am worrying about this. 

 

P.S. I see my sig line is extremely out of date. DD is now 16!

 

You are a private school. You issue your own diploma, based on your own graduation requirements. You might have one printed by HSLDA, or Homeschool Diploma, but you are still the issuing authority.

 

And of course there needs to be a diploma, because your dd will be asked if she graduated from high school, and the answer will be YES; a diploma makes that look official to her. :-) She might also have to provide a photocopy of it at some point (neither my dc nor I have ever had to do that, but I have heard of others having to).

 

Yes, you should do a transcript, because you're a private school, and that's what private schools do. I don't know if she'll have to submit one for the c.c or not (it's easy to find that out), but you should be prepared.

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Most kids actually take pre-algebra in 7th here.  Algebra I in high school is considered a bit of a remedial course (this could be our district... they are pretty pushy on the academics).  However, there is a junior in Ani's A1 class and a senior in her friend's A1 class.

 

You get to issue a diploma and make up whatever requirements you want for graduation.  It is better for her to understand the math than to be pushed through and end up confused.

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My oldest had 2 high school math credits when I 'graduated' her.

 

The CC will need a transcript--signed by you with graduation date listed in front of notary.

 

My dd had Algebra 2 on her transcript so she was allowed to 'try' College Algebra even though she did not pass the placement test.  She made an A (but her Algebra skills were solid).

 

If you do not get to Algebra 2 then she will need to take remedial math classes--full price but no credit earned.

 

Do not worry about Geometry.  Just try to complete Algebra 1 and as much of Algebra 2 as possible.

 

She will also have to pass the COMPASS placement test for English (grammar/editing and an essay) or take remedial courses.  The majority of classes have passing this test as a prerequisite (or an acceptable score on ACT/SAT).

 

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First, you absolutely did the right thing.  You moved at her pace and gave her a chance to actually understand the material instead of rushing her through on someone else's arbitrary time line.  Congratulations, Mom!

 

Second. as others have said, you are the issuing authority for the hs diploma.  There are various sites where you can get a template to make an official looking one and I encourage you to do so.  

 

You should also definitely create a transcript.  I am in the process of prepping to do this starting next year.  My DD with be going into 8th but I want a system in place before high school.  She is bright but also behind in math.  I have no idea how the path with play out for her but I hope for her to hit Algebra I in 10th.  Maybe sooner, but who knows?

 

You need to definitely contact the junior college to find out what admission requirements are and work from there.  Do you school in the summer?  If not, you may want to plan on schooling through the summers.

 

If it looks like the junior college needs more math than your DD will have completed by the time she finishes what would normally be considered her 12th grade year, then you might also consider converting her 10th grade year to her her 9th grade year for transcript purposes and give her an extra year to get all her credits taken to graduate.  Her transcript would be more in line with the norm then and it might open up more options for after high school.  Also, as Jann in TX says, if she hasn't done Algebra II by the time she graduates she will probably have to take a remedial math course on your dime and it might not go at a pace she can handle.  Giving her the extra time at home to complete Algebra II might work better.  Just a thought.

 

FWIW: I know a lot of posters are says don't worry about Geometry but for some kids that is where the real fun is in math.  DD is like that.  She prefers Geometry.  I am tentatively planning to pair Geometry and Algebra II and take two years to complete both, instead of doing a year of one and a year of another so she stays interested in math.  Of course, this is predicated on her getting to Algebra II in the first place.   :)

 

Big hugs.  :grouphug:

 

Edited to add how is she doing with understanding of math she will need day to day as an adult?  Consumer math gets a bad wrap but it is absolutely critical.  Too many kids go out with no idea how to truly budget, plan ahead financially, pay bills, save, avoid credit card debt, etc.  I was one of those.  Mom and Dad pressed the academics, but not practical application math.  I really, really wish they had not just assumed that if I could do Algebra I automatically knew how to balance my checkbook, create a long term savings plan, invest in stock, plan for retirement, pay bills, etc.

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At this point you and your DD should be thinking about life after high school and Jr college. Does she have any idea what she wants to do?

 

STEM is pretty much out of the picture.

 

 

I don't think STEM is out of reach for any student that wants to go that route.

 

Sure, the kid will have to take some remedial classes to get started, but not having advanced math in high school is not the end of the world.  And, it doesn't mean the student is not capable of those types of courses.

 

My husband went to college after military.  He had to take remedial classes in math at CC.  He is a mechanical engineer.

 

TO THE ORIGINAL POSTER:  Nothing is impossible for your student.  She seems to be progressing.  Some students just take a little longer to mature in certain areas of academics.  Don't let brash sounding comments make you doubt yourself or your student.

 

Robin

 

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I don't think STEM is out of reach for any student that wants to go that route.

 

Sure, the kid will have to take some remedial classes to get started, but not having advanced math in high school is not the end of the world.  And, it doesn't mean the student is not capable of those types of courses.

 

My husband went to college after military.  He had to take remedial classes in math at CC.  He is a mechanical engineer.

 

TO THE ORIGINAL POSTER:  Nothing is impossible for your student.  She seems to be progressing.  Some students just take a little longer to mature in certain areas of academics.  Don't let brash sounding comments make you doubt yourself or your student.

 

Robin

 

I agree.  My husband was awful at lower level math and struggled with school in general.  But he went on to college and is an extremely successful broadcast engineer and also went into college level computer classes and started his own computer business on the side.  OP, Robin is right.  Nothing is impossible for your student.  She has a supportive mother who understood her need to go slowly in an area she needed more time.  You are giving her the tools she needs at the pace she needs them.  Keep doing what you are doing and give her a chance to find whatever path fits best for her (including a STEM major if she so chooses).  :)

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I believe Pre Algebra is normally taken in 8th grade in Texas Public Schools. However, many students take it in 7th grade. My DD is very strong in Math (it is her easiest subject) and she probably could have taken Pre Algebra, now, in 7th grade, but then she would have taken Algebra 1 in 8th grade and there is an EOC examination in Texas (End of Course exam) for Public School students, for Algebra 1, which must be taken in 9th grade. So, DD is taking the regular sequence and she will  be current in Algebra 1 when she takes the EOC exam for that course.

 

In your case, as a Home Schooler, I believe that you will create your own transcript and create your own diploma. It sounds like you are on the right path, planning on a community college, after high school graduation and hopefully she will have Algebra 1 and also Algebra 2 or Geometry 1 completed, by the time she graduates from your home school. If were planning to take the SAT and/or ACT and go directly into a university, this would probably be much more of an issue, but for community college I think she will be OK.   GL

Just wanted to comment on the bolded for clarification. My ds is taking Alg 1 in the public school in 7th grade and took his EOC last week. The schools don't wait for 9th grade before giving the EOC. It's given the year they take the class. 

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A thought ~ I'd suggest doing math year round and adding more math time to her day.  That way, instead of having only two additional math credits, she might actually be able to obtain two and a half or three more credits.

 

Regards,

Kareni

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I don't think STEM is out of reach for any student that wants to go that route.

 

Sure, the kid will have to take some remedial classes to get started, but not having advanced math in high school is not the end of the world.  And, it doesn't mean the student is not capable of those types of courses.

 

My husband went to college after military.  He had to take remedial classes in math at CC.  He is a mechanical engineer.

 

TO THE ORIGINAL POSTER:  Nothing is impossible for your student.  She seems to be progressing.  Some students just take a little longer to mature in certain areas of academics.  Don't let brash sounding comments make you doubt yourself or your student.

 

Robin

 

:iagree: STEM is still doable! She'll just have to work a little harder, and a bit longer.  As a PP said a lot of kids like/love Geometry so you could incorporate it over the next 2 years and if you do Math (intensively) through the Summer you'll have 3 years worth at the end of 12th grade which is what most Colleges require. A year or two at the CC or Jr College then transfer to a 4 year and she could do/be ANYTHING!

 

A suggestion for Curriculum- I never made it through Algebra 1 in H.S. I could not understand Math at all. I was sure that when DS got to Algebra1  I wouldn't be able to keep up.  Some very nice people here suggested Power Basics Algebra from Walch Publishing. DS of course has no trouble with Algebra but the amazing thing is that I "get it" too.  I'm actually having fun learning along with him.  Power Basics also has Geometry which we will be starting next month.  Another resource  is YourTeacher you can get a free Summer subscription through Homeschool Byers Co-op. She may understand terms and explanations better if it's done both verbally and on a white board (I do).  Good Luck.

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Going to jump back in. Even if she does have algebra 2, the CC may require her to take remedial math. It is NOT the end of the world. Here, if you do not have the required score on the ACT (which it is required to take for admission even though you do not have to make any certain scores to be admitted), you have to take the Compass test and are placed in a class based on that score. They will not allow you to take a class higher than you score even if you have taken advanced calculus classes and passed them in high school. 

 

Also, she can still major in anything she wants to major in (as long as she can pass the classes when she takes them of course!). My STEM dd started out in college algebra on her own decision. She had taken precalc in high school. She placed into calculus with her ACT score. She decided to start with precalc. She switched to college algebra after the first week. (Her college does not allow any calculators and she was feeling uncertain.) She has gotten A's in her classes. Her confidence has soared. She will graduate on time, unless something else comes up! Yeah, we are having to pay for those classes. I don't care. I'd rather have her with excellent grades and high confidence!

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Most kids actually take pre-algebra in 7th here.  Algebra I in high school is considered a bit of a remedial course (this could be our district... they are pretty pushy on the academics).  However, there is a junior in Ani's A1 class and a senior in her friend's A1 class.

 

You get to issue a diploma and make up whatever requirements you want for graduation.  It is better for her to understand the math than to be pushed through and end up confused.

 

I assume that you do not live in Texas (however, possibly you live in an ISD in Texas that does that), because one of the EOC (End of Course) examinations required for graduation from  Public High Schools in Texas is for Algebra 1.  That examination is given when they are in 9th grade.  Our DD will take Algebra 1 when she is in 9th grade, so she will not need to take a "crash course" to pick up on what she'd forgotten about Algebra 1, when she takes the EOC.  DD is a TTUISD student and they must comply with the laws for Public Schools in Texas.  My DD probably would have done well, if we had elected for her to take Pre Algebra now (she is in 7th grade), but this was our main reason for deciding to wait for her to take Pre Algebra in 8th grade. 

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Just wanted to comment on the bolded for clarification. My ds is taking Alg 1 in the public school in 7th grade and took his EOC last week. The schools don't wait for 9th grade before giving the EOC. It's given the year they take the class. 

 

Thank you for that information. Very interesting!   I communicate with a family with 3 DC in TTUISD. Their oldest had taken a course that requires an EOC exam, early, and then had to wait until the next school year, to take that EOC exam, when she was in that grade. She had a tutor, but it was a PITA, for her to take the EOC exam a year after she had completed the course.

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I assume that you do not live in Texas (however, possibly you live in an ISD in Texas that does that), because one of the EOC (End of Course) examinations required for graduation from  Public High Schools in Texas is for Algebra 1.  That examination is given when they are in 9th grade.  Our DD will take Algebra 1 when she is in 9th grade, so she will not need to take a "crash course" to pick up on what she'd forgotten about Algebra 1, when she takes the EOC.  DD is a TTUISD student and they must comply with the laws for Public Schools in Texas.  My DD probably would have done well, if we had elected for her to take Pre Algebra now (she is in 7th grade), but this was our main reason for deciding to wait for her to take Pre Algebra in 8th grade. 

 

No, that is quite incorrect.  Yes, I live in TX.  All of the ISDs do it this way for real life classes (TTUISD may do it differently for distance learners).  The kids take the STAAR EOC after they take A1.  That is most often in 8th grade.

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Thank you for that information. Very interesting!   I communicate with a family with 3 DC in TTUISD. Their oldest had taken a course that requires an EOC exam, early, and then had to wait until the next school year, to take that EOC exam, when she was in that grade. She had a tutor, but it was a PITA, for her to take the EOC exam a year after she had completed the course.

 

I wonder if different isd's do things differently and/or have different requirements. It would certainly be tough to take an EOC for a class taken a couple years prior! I wonder if TTUISD didn't have enough space for the student to take the EOC that year and needed a reason to make her wait. (That's just conjecture. I have no idea how TTUISD really works, but it's strange to me that the students would need to wait to take the test based on when most other students would take it.)

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Just coming back to this. Wow! All the info has been great.

 

I think we've got a plan. I'm going to check with our CC and see what they require for admission. I have thorough records of last year's (freshman) work, so making a transcript should be easy enough. 

 

Honestly, THIS child will major in something as far away from numbers as possible. She is a stellar student in Lit./Comp, History and Spanish. Her brain quite clearly thrives on WORDS. Her brother is in advanced math, and they will both be in Algebra this coming school year (8th grade and 11th) so you just never know. 

 

I feel much more confident now about issuing a diploma with what we are doing, and she will have finished Algebra 2 by the time she graduates. She has been working through the summers for a while; I was actually considering finally giving her a summer off to explore things in line with her interests, driver's ed, working at church, etc. instead of obsessing over this one subject that has always been her nemesis. I think we can deal with whatever math we need, even as a remedial course, AFTER we get through Alg. 1 and 2.

 

I stunk at math. REally bad. I struggled through basic college math…and then went on to a grad. school and did just fine. I think she may follow a similar path. I was so glad to hear the positive testimonies and encouraging words. THank you!!!!

 

BTW I have no clue what STEM is -- ??

 

Now I need to decide on math for next year and decide if we are staying with TT for algebra or changing, so you will probably see another post very soon. :)

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I wonder if different isd's do things differently and/or have different requirements. It would certainly be tough to take an EOC for a class taken a couple years prior! I wonder if TTUISD didn't have enough space for the student to take the EOC that year and needed a reason to make her wait. (That's just conjecture. I have no idea how TTUISD really works, but it's strange to me that the students would need to wait to take the test based on when most other students would take it.)

 

I don't know about the test either, but FWIW my nephew in PS in TX is taking algebra 1 in 7th and that seems to be *not at all unusual* for advanced students in his school.  It would be very strange to make them wait.

 

On the other hand, personally, I would not be too concerned about advanced students being tested on it later, as the even-later SAT is loaded with algebra.  (My fifth grader is doing alg 1 now and will have a placement test for the high school at the end of 8th for each high school math class that he has finished: alg 1, geometry, and perhaps alg2/trig if he gets that far.)

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