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 If you have used Spielvogel Western Civilization, how did you evaluate the Focus and Critical Thinking questions? I haven't been able to find a teacher's edition. Are there only study guides for the 6th edition? Also, how did you evaluate the course overall? Did you use written tests, have your student write papers, base it on your discussions?  

 

Any feedback or advice would be GREATLY appreciated!

 

 

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We used it last year.  I didn't grade the focus/critical thinking questions. We discussed them and I expected him to be able to give clear answers.  Most of the time they were clear enough for me to know he understood what he was reading.

 

We also used CengageBrain.com for quizzes and a final exam.  Just put in the ISBN of your book and look under the tab for free materials.

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One more question . . . do you think we can comfortably cover the whole book in two years with additional readings and TTC dvd's? 

 

That would depend entirely on the amount of reading and TC lectures you plan to incorporate.

We are using the book spread out over four years, but then DS has also been listening to 84 hours of TC lectures this year alone.

If you include fewer lectures, you should be able to get through the book in two years easily. I think the text is typically covered in two semesters at college.

 

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Thank you Regentrude. Could you tell me how you evaluate the course overall? 

 

Thanks! Dina

 

 

That would depend entirely on the amount of reading and TC lectures you plan to incorporate.

We are using the book spread out over four years, but then DS has also been listening to 84 hours of TC lectures this year alone.

If you include fewer lectures, you should be able to get through the book in two years easily. I think the text is typically covered in two semesters at college.
 

 

 

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I agree with what Regentrude said.

 

We used Western Civilization: A Brief History alone over the course of a year, using only the supplemental materials available on CengageBrain.   We simply wanted to check off the box as DS wasn't interested in a deep dive into world history.  I'm sure we could have easily spread it out if he'd wanted to be more thorough.

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Thanks. We were looking at the 8th edition which is not the brief version. I appreciate your response.

 

 

I agree with what Regentrude said.

 

We used Western Civilization: A Brief History alone over the course of a year, using only the supplemental materials available on CengageBrain.   We simply wanted to check off the box as DS wasn't interested in a deep dive into world history.  I'm sure we could have easily spread it out if he'd wanted to be more thorough.

 

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FYI-you can register with the publisher as a homeschool instructor and gain access to all the online teacher materials.  I don't believe there are currently any printed teacher materials.  Registration is free, just a bit of hassle and back and forth emailing to put it all through. I may have had to sign a document stating I was a homeschool instructor and understood that teacher materials were not for distribution or I may have had to send in a copy of my approval letter from the county (or both).  I've done this with a few publishers, always with success in the end, but I forget which required which piece of paperwork.  I think everything was a scan and send situation.

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Thank you so much; this info is very helpful!

FYI-you can register with the publisher as a homeschool instructor and gain access to all the online teacher materials.  I don't believe there are currently any printed teacher materials.  Registration is free, just a bit of hassle and back and forth emailing to put it all through. I may have had to sign a document stating I was a homeschool instructor and understood that teacher materials were not for distribution or I may have had to send in a copy of my approval letter from the county (or both).  I've done this with a few publishers, always with success in the end, but I forget which required which piece of paperwork.  I think everything was a scan and send situation.

 

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FYI-you can register with the publisher as a homeschool instructor and gain access to all the online teacher materials.  I don't believe there are currently any printed teacher materials.  Registration is free, just a bit of hassle and back and forth emailing to put it all through. I may have had to sign a document stating I was a homeschool instructor and understood that teacher materials were not for distribution or I may have had to send in a copy of my approval letter from the county (or both).  I've done this with a few publishers, always with success in the end, but I forget which required which piece of paperwork.  I think everything was a scan and send situation.

 

What kind of materials does jumping through these hoops give you?

 

I found that there is plenty of free stuff available online to add to the textbook. For example the companion website:

http://www.cengagebrain.com/cgi-wadsworth/course_products_wp.pl?fid=M20b&product_isbn_issn=9780495571476&token=

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What kind of materials does jumping through these hoops give you?

 

I found that there is plenty of free stuff available online to add to the textbook. For example the companion website:

http://www.cengagebrain.com/cgi-wadsworth/course_products_wp.pl?fid=M20b&product_isbn_issn=9780495571476&token=

 

It depends on the book referenced.  For Pearson, many of the literature anthologies have Instructor Manuals with biographical info on the authors or highpoints of the works included.  One anthology I looked at for medieval lit had a couple sample sets of suggested works to read for different courses.  The Western Civ text I looked at had an instructor guide and powerpoint lectures.  It looks like College Physics has the Instructor's Solutions Manual and possibly the Instructor Guide. 

 

On the other hand, the computer science book I was looking at didn't have much listed as resources.

 

The relative value of the materials depends on the ability to make use of them.

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It depends on the book referenced.  For Pearson, many of the literature anthologies have Instructor Manuals with biographical info on the authors or highpoints of the works included.  One anthology I looked at for medieval lit had a couple sample sets of suggested works to read for different courses.  The Western Civ text I looked at had an instructor guide and powerpoint lectures.  It looks like College Physics has the Instructor's Solutions Manual and possibly the Instructor Guide. 

On the other hand, the computer science book I was looking at didn't have much listed as resources.

The relative value of the materials depends on the ability to make use of them.

 

Sorry, I did not make myself clear: I was specifically asking what I'd get for the Spielvogel text that would not be available otherwise. What does an "instructor guide" for a history text contain?

 

I understand the value of solution manuals for math and science courses but am puzzled what added value is provided for a history text.

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Sorry, I did not make myself clear: I was specifically asking what I'd get for the Spielvogel text that would not be available otherwise. What does an "instructor guide" for a history text contain?

 

I understand the value of solution manuals for math and science courses but am puzzled what added value is provided for a history text.

 

Regentrude,

 

I'm in a bit of a rush just now but I will get back with an answer over the weekend when I can check the web site.  I had a rep on the phone when I was working getting instructor access to another text (art history I think) and she asked what other books I would like access to so I put Spielvogel on the list just because I could. 

 

Sorry for the delay.

 

 

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That would depend entirely on the amount of reading and TC lectures you plan to incorporate.

We are using the book spread out over four years, but then DS has also been listening to 84 hours of TC lectures this year alone.

If you include fewer lectures, you should be able to get through the book in two years easily. I think the text is typically covered in two semesters at college.

 

 

Are you back to Medieval studies, this time with your son?  So all three sets of Middle Ages and the Italian Renaissance?

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Are you back to Medieval studies, this time with your son?  So all three sets of Middle Ages and the Italian Renaissance?

 

No, we did Ancients this year. The TC lectures we used were:

 

All Vandiver lectures:

The Iliad (12 lectures), The Odyssey (12 lectures), The Aeneid (12 lectures)

 Greek Tragedy (24 lectures), Classical Mythology (24 lectures), Herodotus (12 lectures)

 

Famous Romans (24 Lectures) taught by Prof. Rufus Fears

Great Battles of the Ancient World (24 lectures) taught by Prof. John W. Lee

The Persian Empire (24 lectures) taught by Prof. Garrett Fagan

 

Video lectures: Rome - a visual exploration (36 lectures – selections)

 

ETA: For next year Medieval/Renaissance, we will use:

all three Daileader sets plus his new course on the Crusades (excited about that one!) plus the course on Vikings

Bartlett's Italian Renaissance, selections of the Dante lectures, selections of Shakespeare lectures

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Sorry, I did not make myself clear: I was specifically asking what I'd get for the Spielvogel text that would not be available otherwise. What does an "instructor guide" for a history text contain?

 

I understand the value of solution manuals for math and science courses but am puzzled what added value is provided for a history text.

 

My misunderstanding.  For Spielvogel specifically you'll have to wait for info on the Cengage site to know what's on the professional side of their website.

 

I can give an idea of what I found for Kagan's Western Heritage.  I don't know if that will be helpful or non-relevant.  The downloadable instructor manual is 200+ pages (the text itself is probably 1000+).  It has two brief course outlines for a Western Civ I and II (each 1 semester long) with chapter readings and assignments for the My History Lab website (I don't have access to MyHistoryLab and the assignments don't seem to correspond directly to what is on the open Companion Site for older editions of Kagan.)  The syllabus isn't particularly detailed. It assigns one chapter per week of class.  There are extra readings from primary sources mentioned in the MyHistoryLab assignments.  Some are too vague to be useful without the site (selections from the Quran), but others were things I could find with a web search Polybius on Why Romans and Not Greeks Govern the World.

 

There are several pages for each chapter. They include a summary of the chapter, a chapter outline (with corresponding sections in My History Lab), discussion questions, lecture topics, suggested films, more possible questions, a list of web links and more possible assignments from My History Lab.

 

I would say the chapter summary reminds me of material in Sonlight or TOG where the teacher manual tries to give an overview of the highlights of what the student might have gotten from the readings. The suggested documents would have some value. Many are available from online sites like Fordham's internet archives or various art museum websites. The image titles could give good tips of search terms (ex. St Bartholemew's Massacre is an event I've heard of, but I might not remember to look for anything on it when we are discussing the period of the Renaissance and Reformation).  The discussion questions have some utility, but there are no sample answers.  So if it helps you get the main points out of the readings, great. But it's not a solutions manual. (The lecture topic items do give some of the highlights that would be answers to the discussion questions. But it's an awkward match.)

 

It's not bad for a free resource.  I think it adds as much as many history curriculum do at a higher price.  But it does anticipate a familiarity on the part of the user with themes in history.  I don't think I'd hand it to the student as a guide for their independent studies.  I might well use the discussion questions as assignments or short written prompts.

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Dina,

 

There is a wealth of free materials online that can help you plan your course. If you want more than what your textbook site offers, check out the sites for other comparable texts. Your book is on the AP European History list:

 

Index of Textbooks

Chambers, Mortimer, et al. The Western Experience. New York: McGraw-Hill. All editions published from 2007 to the present.

Cole, Joshua, and Carol Symes. Western Civilizations: Their History and Their Culture. New York: W. W. Norton. All editions published from 2011 to the present.

Hunt, Lynn, et al. The Making of the West: Peoples and Cultures. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin's. All editions published from 2008 to the present

Kagan, Donald, Steven Ozment, and Frank M. Turner. The Western Heritage: Since 1300. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson. All editions published from 2010 to the present.

Kagan, Donald, Steven Ozment, and Frank M. Turner. The Western Heritage. TLC (brief) edition. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson. All editions published from 2009 to the present.

Kishlansky, Mark, Patricia O'Brien, and Patrick Geary. Civilization in the West. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson. All editions published from 2007 to the present.

McKay, John P., Bennett D. Hill, John Buckler, and Clare Haru Crowston. A History of Western Society. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin's. All editions published from 2007 to the present.

Merriman, John. A History of Modern Europe: From the Renaissance to the Present. New York: W. W. Norton. All editions published from 2009 to the present.

Noble, Thomas F. X., et al. Western Civilization: Beyond Boundaries. Boston: Cengage Learning. All editions published from 2009 to the present.

Palmer, R. R., Joel Colton, and Lloyd Kramer. A History of the Modern World. New York: McGraw-Hill. All editions published from 2007 to the present.

Perry, Marvin. Western Civilization: A Brief History. Boston: Cengage Learning. All editions published from 2008 to the present.

Perry, Marvin, et al. Western Civilization: Ideas, Politics, and Society. Boston: Cengage Learning. All editions published from 2007 to the present.

Spielvogel, Jackson J. Western Civilization. Belmont, CA: Cengage Learning. All editions published from 2009 to the present.

Spielvogel, Jackson J. Western Civilization: A Brief History. Vol. II. Belmont, CA: Cengage Learning. All editions published from 2010 to the present.

 

The Western Civ. texts cover relatively the same material, but have different slants according to their authors. It is very easy to pull supplemental materials from a textbook site other than your own. Some sites are stingy with free support materials while others are incredibly generous. You can mix it up.

 

If you want essay questions, look at the AP Central site.  There are a ton of questions and you can look at actual sample responses as well as the criteria to see what is expected. The questions will give you an idea of the level of analysis eventually expected from a high school/college student.  I have a list somewhere that has all of the questions ordered by time period. I will see if I can find it, if you are interested.

 

If you can't find a teacher's manual and don't have time to read the text with your student, you can pick up a great set of notes from historysage.com.  You can see several samples of the notes and if you want a whole set, I think I paid $35.  The caveat here is that the notes will only start with the middle ages.

 

One of my absolute favorite websites is Sandra Pojer's history site. I have connected you to her European Civ. site that has assignments and questions and other resources. I have adapted a bunch of her PowerPoint presentations. The kids can actually take quizzes on her site and get a score.

 

None of this answers your Spievogel question, but hopefully something here helps.

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Lisa~

 

This is so helpful! Thanks! :thumbup1:

Dina,

 

There is a wealth of free materials online that can help you plan your course. If you want more than what your textbook site offers, check out the sites for other comparable texts. Your book is on the AP European History list:

 

Index of Textbooks

Chambers, Mortimer, et al. The Western Experience. New York: McGraw-Hill. All editions published from 2007 to the present.

Cole, Joshua, and Carol Symes. Western Civilizations: Their History and Their Culture. New York: W. W. Norton. All editions published from 2011 to the present.

Hunt, Lynn, et al. The Making of the West: Peoples and Cultures. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin's. All editions published from 2008 to the present

Kagan, Donald, Steven Ozment, and Frank M. Turner. The Western Heritage: Since 1300. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson. All editions published from 2010 to the present.

Kagan, Donald, Steven Ozment, and Frank M. Turner. The Western Heritage. TLC (brief) edition. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson. All editions published from 2009 to the present.

Kishlansky, Mark, Patricia O'Brien, and Patrick Geary. Civilization in the West. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson. All editions published from 2007 to the present.

McKay, John P., Bennett D. Hill, John Buckler, and Clare Haru Crowston. A History of Western Society. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin's. All editions published from 2007 to the present.

Merriman, John. A History of Modern Europe: From the Renaissance to the Present. New York: W. W. Norton. All editions published from 2009 to the present.

Noble, Thomas F. X., et al. Western Civilization: Beyond Boundaries. Boston: Cengage Learning. All editions published from 2009 to the present.

Palmer, R. R., Joel Colton, and Lloyd Kramer. A History of the Modern World. New York: McGraw-Hill. All editions published from 2007 to the present.

Perry, Marvin. Western Civilization: A Brief History. Boston: Cengage Learning. All editions published from 2008 to the present.

Perry, Marvin, et al. Western Civilization: Ideas, Politics, and Society. Boston: Cengage Learning. All editions published from 2007 to the present.

Spielvogel, Jackson J. Western Civilization. Belmont, CA: Cengage Learning. All editions published from 2009 to the present.

Spielvogel, Jackson J. Western Civilization: A Brief History. Vol. II. Belmont, CA: Cengage Learning. All editions published from 2010 to the present.

 

The Western Civ. texts cover relatively the same material, but have different slants according to their authors. It is very easy to pull supplemental materials from a textbook site other than your own. Some sites are stingy with free support materials while others are incredibly generous. You can mix it up.

 

If you want essay questions, look at the AP Central site.  There are a ton of questions and you can look at actual sample responses as well as the criteria to see what is expected. The questions will give you an idea of the level of analysis eventually expected from a high school/college student.  I have a list somewhere that has all of the questions ordered by time period. I will see if I can find it, if you are interested.

 

If you can't find a teacher's manual and don't have time to read the text with your student, you can pick up a great set of notes from historysage.com.  You can see several samples of the notes and if you want a whole set, I think I paid $35.  The caveat here is that the notes will only start with the middle ages.

 

One of my absolute favorite websites is Sandra Pojer's history site. I have connected you to her European Civ. site that has assignments and questions and other resources. I have adapted a bunch of her PowerPoint presentations. The kids can actually take quizzes on her site and get a score.

 

None of this answers your Spievogel question, but hopefully something here helps.

 

 

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What kind of materials does jumping through these hoops give you?

 

I found that there is plenty of free stuff available online to add to the textbook. For example the companion website:

http://www.cengagebrain.com/cgi-wadsworth/course_products_wp.pl?fid=M20b&product_isbn_issn=9780495571476&token=

 

Sorry for the delay regentrude...life took over this weekend-sigh.

 

I have access for:

Western Civilization: Volume I: To 1715, 7th Edition and Volume 2

Jackson J. Spielvogel

ISBN-10: 0-495-50286-3

ISBN-13: 978-0-495-50286-9

 

Access Instructor Supplements

  • Wadsworth Western Civilization Resource Center 2-Semester (This is a bit more interesting, it includes primary source documents (some with suggested essay and short answer questions), images, maps (with assignments and interactive), simulation games, and more.)  I do like the look of the primary source documents available here...
  • Cengage Learning eBook 2-Semester for Spielvogel's Western Civilization  (an online version of the text)
  • eAudio The History Handbook Podcasts, Complete  (downloaded as a zip file?)
  • InfoTrac® 2-Semester

The Instructor Site has the same information that your Book Companion site has-they call that the Student Companion.  For my edition it doesn't include maps but is essentially the same.  The instructor site has an instructor manual, power point slides, AP instructors guides, test banks, and blank maps (which I suspect are maps from the text with labels removed).  There is also the opportunity to set up a class page with grades, exercises, etc.  I do like the test banks because I sometimes worry my tests aren't objective or are unrealistic (either too easy or too hard), I'll use some questions or get ideas from here. 

 

For Spielvogel I haven't really used this resource that much, I just asked for it since they were in a giving mood when I signed up for the art history access.  I'd love to comment more but haven't used it enough. 

 

For those considering asking for instructor access do realize that the information while similar between texts can also vary greatly.  It can certainly be worth a few emails to set this up.

 

**Edit**  By the last statement above I meant not only different texts-as in different editions of the same text but also completely different texts.  The types of material that I gained access to for art history, human geography, and science courses are all different.  The italics above indicate my comments on those items.

 

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Thank you Jumped. Dina

Sorry for the delay regentrude...life took over this weekend-sigh.

 

I have access for:

Western Civilization: Volume I: To 1715, 7th Edition and Volume 2

Jackson J. Spielvogel
ISBN-10: 0-495-50286-3
ISBN-13: 978-0-495-50286-9

 

Access Instructor Supplements
  • Wadsworth Western Civilization Resource Center 2-Semester (This is a bit more interesting, it includes primary source documents (some with suggested essay and short answer questions), images, maps (with assignments and interactive), simulation games, and more.)  I do like the look of the primary source documents available here...
  • Cengage Learning eBook 2-Semester for Spielvogel's Western Civilization  (an online version of the text)
  • eAudio The History Handbook Podcasts, Complete  
  • InfoTrac® 2-Semester

The Instructor Site has the same information that your Book Companion site has-they call that the Student Companion.  For my edition it doesn't include maps but is essentially the same.  The instructor site has an instructor manual, power point slides, AP instructors guides, test banks, and blank maps (which I suspect are maps from the text with labels removed).  There is also the opportunity to set up a class page with grades, exercises, etc.  I do like the test banks because I sometimes worry my tests aren't objective or are unrealistic (either too easy or too hard), I'll use some questions or get ideas from the here. 

 

For Spielvogel I haven't really used this resource that much, I just asked for it since they were in a giving mood when I signed up for the art history access.  I'd love to comment more but haven't used it enough.

 

For those considering asking for instructor access do realize that the information while similar between texts can also vary greatly.  It can certainly be worth a few emails to set this up.

 

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