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Epic Thread of Geometry Programs! (OR Geometry Thread of Epic Proportions!)


Gil
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Epic Thread of Geometry Programs OR Geometry Thread of Epic Proportions  

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  1. 1. Which Title do YOU Prefer?

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I have seen a dozen or more threads on algebra and pre-algebra programs--including a few epic ones like the Pre-Algebra and Algebra Fence Straddlers threads which are effing EPIC! I'm still reading and taking notes!--but I haven't found any on Geometry. Forgive me if there is an Epic Geometry Thread and I've missed it. (Please link it here, if there is one) I searched the archives of the Highschool, K-8 and and Logic Stage/Middle School boards before starting this.

 

If you've used any of the programs I list, can you please provide some feedback on it. I'm just looking ahead to the next 6-18months but I can't make spur of the moment purchases so I need to know ahead of time what to look out for. I like to try and get books via ILL to evaluate them. While Pal is Geo-curious he isn't quite ready for a full course on proof-based Geometry...yet so we will probably make 2 passes at Geometry. Any and all feedback is appreciated.

 

Based on my experience, this forum and a site of HS curriculum reviews I have compiled a list of programs to discuss. Please, please, please feel free to add anything that I have over looked!

 

Key to Geometry (Key Curriculum Press)

Understanding Geometry (Critical Thinking Company.)
Geometry Practice Book (Mark Twain Media)

Discovering Geometry: An Investigative Approach + Workbook (David Serra)

Paper Patty Geometry + Workbook (David Serra)

Math U See: Geometry (Steve Demme)

Geometry for Christian Schools (BJU Press)

Saxon Geometry (Saxon Publishing)

A Fresh Approach: Geometry (C. Walters)

Geometry (UCSMP)

Thinkwell Geometry

Geometry DVD Course (The Teaching Company)

Geometry: Seeing, Doing and Understanding (H. Jacobs)

Life of Fred: Geometry

Teaching Textbooks: Geometry

Geometry PACES or DVDS (School of Tomorrow)

Plane Geometry (A Beka)

Geometry: A Guided Inquiry (w or w/o DVD support by Math Without Borders: Geometry [Thank you, RedSquirrel for the clarification!]

VideoText: Geometry

[Following are suggestions courtesy of Arcadia!]

Geometry (Ray C. Jurgensen, Richard G. Brown, and John W. Jurgensen)
Geometry for Challenge and Enjoyment  (Richard Rhoad, George Milauskas, and Robert Whipple)
AoPS: Introduction to Geometry (AoPS - Richard Rusczyk)
Geometry, Book I Planimetry  (A.P. Kiselev)
Lessons in Geometry, I. Plane Geometry  (Jacques Hadamard)
Geometry Revisited (H. S. M. Coxeter and S. L. Greitzer)

[Thank you, Arcadia for all of the above!]

Modern Geometry: Structure and Method [Thank you, RedSquirrel]

First Lessons in Geometry (T. Hill) FREE PDF [super Thank You to CritterFixer]

Geometry - Book 1: Planimetry (A.P. Kiselev)

Geometry - Book 2: Stereometry (A.P. Kiselev) [Thank you, CrimsonWife]

Elementary Geometry for College Students  (D.C. Alexander) [Thank you 8FillTheHeart]

Geometry: A Hands-On Geometric Approach (Right Start) [Thank you CMama]

Rays Treatise on Geometry and Trigononmetry (Rays | Eclectic Education Series) [Thank you CritterFixer]

Rays Analytic Geometry (Rays | Eclectic Education Series) [Thank you CritterFixer]

[Thank you Wapiti for the following]

Basic Concepts in Geometry: An Intro to Proof. (Frank Allen)

Euclids Elements (Euclid,D. Densmore and T.L. Heath)

Geometry: Euclid and Beyond (R. Harsthorne)

[Thank you Wapiti for the above!]

Art of Problem Solving: Introductory Geometry [Thank you lewelma!]

 

 

Discuss :)

 

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I don't have much to add, but I'm glad you started this thread!  I'm already worrying about geometry, having (I think) figured out PreAlgebra & Algebra 1.  I don't like geometry much, I'm not a good spatial thinker, all I remember from 9th grade geometry was a really boring math teacher writing proofs on the board for us to copy down.

 

I liked the geometry sections in Alcumus PreAlgebra playlist, but I hear that AoPS Geometry is really hard and very proof heavy, so I'm not leaning in that direction.

 

I own LOF geometry but haven't really looked at it.  I bought it on a LOF/eBay binge when I first started homeschooling.  I have no idea if it is a good approach, I don't know how I'd even tell.  Did I mention geometry is not my strong suit?

 

We have Understanding Geometry from Critical Thinking Co and started using it.  I thought it would be great at first, but I'm not sure it has enough teaching/explanation - I think it might work for practice problems - they are good problems - as a supplement to a video-based teaching class (or a competent teacher) but I'm not finding it to be stand-alone.

 

What I find myself leaning towards based on reading threads here is either Jacobs Geometry - apparently the 2nd edition is the preferred one, I can't recall why - or Teaching Textbooks geometry, which I have read is pretty good.  

 

Anyway, I will follow this thread with great interest!

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To add to your list:

 

Geometry by Ray C. Jurgensen, Richard G. Brown, and John W. Jurgensen
Geometry for Challenge and Enjoyment  by Richard Rhoad, George Milauskas, and Robert Whipple
AoPS Introduction to Geometry by Richard Rusczyk
Geometry, Book I Planimetry  by A.P. Kiselev
Lessons in Geometry, I. Plane Geometry by Jacques Hadamard
Geometry Revisited by H. S. M. Coxeter and S. L. Greitzer

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I have to do something about geometry too. Oddly enough, I never took geometry. I got to take music theory in place of geometry (back in ancient times, when standardized tests were few and far between).

 

I'm planning on using Patty Paper Geometry next year (DS will be in 6th and we'll use it as a fun math program during our January term), but that still doesn't solve my geometry problem for later.

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Kiselev's geometry book is supposed to be excellent but be forewarned that there is no TM or even answer key. So if the parent isn't super-strong in his/her math skills (guilty), then a tutor would need to be hired to take the student through it.

 

I'm still debating the need for a proof-based geometry course in addition to the geometry chapters in Singapore Discovering Mathematics. I personally *HATED* proofs and when I showed oldest DD an example of one, she groaned. DD is unlikely to ever take any math major courses in college where she'd need to be able to do proofs. The Singaporean students always come out near the top of international math tests so the fact that they don't do proofs in their geometry work doesn't seem to be hurting their students any.

 

I go back and forth on this issue. Right now she's still working her way through DM 8 so I don't need to make a decision just yet.

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The Singaporean students always come out near the top of international math tests so the fact that they don't do proofs in their geometry work doesn't seem to be hurting their students any.

 

I did do proofs until my wrist was swollen from all the QED. I forgot which part of Additional Math has proofs since I did Additional Math in 1987. There was also plenty of drills on top of the required school textbooks.

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Listening in.

I'm actually doing a lot of looking for free resources for myself. Found a few things on Googlebooks that were...interesting. Including one written for very young children to study geometry. I may start there.

 

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Well, one slight correction to your OP is that the Math Without Borders program uses "Geometry: A Guided Inquiry" as its text. You don't need the MwoB DVDs to use the textbook. You can just use that text for Geometry.

 

If we didn't use AoPS geometry I was strongly considering "Modern Geometry: Structure and Method". I actually own a 1964 teacher's edition, so it seems a shame to not use it, lol

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Listening in.

I'm actually doing a lot of looking for free resources for myself. Found a few things on Googlebooks that were...interesting. Including one written for very young children to study geometry. I may start there.

Well don't tease us like that! Hasn't the Hive taught you that sharing is caring! :) :rofl:

Throw us a bone or a title...or a link!!!

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Every time I come up with something vintage I'm sure to get told how dreadfully wrong it is! :laugh:

OK.

It's First Lessons in Geometry by Thomas Hill, 1878. He wrote it because he was looking for a geometry study for his kids. They were 5 years old and I think one must have been 7, given the intro. It is very old fashioned, but it has such an imaginative quality to it that I think I can get into it. Since I'm looking to do geometry for myself NEXT year, I thought I'd play around with the ideas this year. Probably not at all what Gil would be looking for. Not problems, just discussion.

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Every time I come up with something vintage I'm sure to get told how dreadfully wrong it is! :laugh:

OK.

It's First Lessons in Geometry by Thomas Hill, 1878. He wrote it because he was looking for a geometry study for his kids. They were 5 years old and I think one must have been 7, given the intro. It is very old fashioned, but it has such an imaginative quality to it that I think I can get into it. Since I'm looking to do geometry for myself NEXT year, I thought I'd play around with the ideas this year. Probably not at all what Gil would be looking for. Not problems, just discussion.

Are you kidding! Of course I would be interested in it! My guys are 6 and 7 right now...Its my 6yo who wants more Geometry and there is never anything wrong with spending more time discussing something--even if they are familiar with it.

 

Imaginative is just another word for 'wonderful' when it comes to math. The wackier, livelier, or funnier something is, the more we enjoy it here at GEAR! Fortunately for me, the boys don't dread 'busy work'. They are just happy to be discussing or doing math :)

 

ETA: I believe you said you'd found a 'few' things...anything else we should know about?

ETA#2: Please NOTE: This thread is meant to be epic and useful to all, not just me and my kids. So everyone, please, please, please share any thing that you have--especially if it is free--because as someone else said: "Sharing is Caring" :)

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It is very old fashioned. The tone might be considered condescending, but it's par on course for that time. I really, really liked the introduction and the way the author goes through explaining what a line is. 

The other was Elementary Geometry by Charles Davies. It starts out with a bunch of terms and how they are defined, and since I'm not at all up on geometry, I liked the idea of learning these terms as part of getting ready for more work. Dead dull, though. Well, compared to Hill's book for young children.

There's always Ray's Geometry, too. I'll probably take a look at that at some point.

I'm just trying to source a good bit of free things for me, things I can have on the laptop, so my "text"books don't take up valuable shelf-room. The shelves are reserved for all the Great Books I'm collecting. :D

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Math here when I was growing up was (and still is) integrated and unless you went into calculus there was no proofs that I can think of.  We did angles and such but they were fairly short units over all.  I have been using an american math program though so I my kids have not done geometry yet (it is started right in Kindy here in ps) so watching this thread with interest to plan ahead for them.  My assumption is we will just keep going through MUS and do the geometry unit but we will see.

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RightStart Geometry: A Hands-On Geometric Approach was not included in your list. (Here's more in-depth information on RS Level G.)

 

We're doing VideoText Algebra alongside RS Geometry. It'll take us two years to complete RS G (including this year) and another year to complete VT Algebra. Then we'll begin geometry again with VT Geometry and/or AoPS Geometry. At least, that's my current plan.

 

ETA: Here's a great comparison of RS Geometry vs. VT Geometry in the AlgebraAtHome Yahoo group (for VT Algebra), written by a mom who's btdt.

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Well, one slight correction to your OP is that the Math Without Borders program uses "Geometry: A Guided Inquiry" as its text. You don't need the MwoB DVDs to use the textbook. You can just use that text for Geometry

I beg to differ. *I* am going to be needing those videos! I don't remember geometry clicking with me much. :)

 

This is what I'm planning on using, BTW.

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The first post has been updated with more programs/suggestions. Its amazing how many options are out there. I hope more folks come to discuss.

OH! I added a VERY SERIOUS poll, please vote and I will give my review/feedback about the Geometry programs that I'm familiar with.

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Kiselev's geometry book is supposed to be excellent but be forewarned that there is no TM or even answer key. So if the parent isn't super-strong in his/her math skills (guilty), then a tutor would need to be hired to take the student through it.

 

 

If you like Kiselev but need TMs and answer keys you could use Solomonvich's "Euclidean Geometry" which has an instructors manual with some solutions or Birkhoff's "Basic Geometry" which has a TM and answer key.

 

All three of these are rigorous, still in print options but seem to have largely fallen out of favor since AoPS has released their books.

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I did do proofs until my wrist was swollen from all the QED. I forgot which part of Additional Math has proofs since I did Additional Math in 1987. There was also plenty of drills on top of the required school textbooks.

Interesting. It isn't listed in the TOC for Additional Mathematics so I hadn't realized that it was in that book: http://www.singaporemath.com/New_Syllabus_Add_l_Math_Textbook_p/nsamt.htm

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I beg to differ. *I* am going to be needing those videos! I don't remember geometry clicking with me much. :)

 

This is what I'm planning on using, BTW.

 

I was investigating MwoB for Algebra (didn't end up using it) and I was told that the DVDs are pretty much a word for word reading of the text and a working out of the example problems in the books. My kid was capable of doing that himself (had done so with SM 6a&6b) so I was told if he could do that I might as well skip buying the DVDs and just use the book.

 

However, YMMV. That might not be a totally accurate description, for one. And I can absolutely see how it might be worth every single penny to have someone ELSE read the text and work through the problems.

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I was investigating MwoB for Algebra (didn't end up using it) and I was told that the DVDs are pretty much a word for word reading of the text and a working out of the example problems in the books. My kid was capable of doing that himself (had done so with SM 6a&6b) so I was told if he could do that I might as well skip buying the DVDs and just use the book.

 

However, YMMV. That might not be a totally accurate description, for one. And I can absolutely see how it might be worth every single penny to have someone ELSE read the text and work through the problems.

 

So no explanations? Hmm.. I think the DVDs are well priced, though. I believe Mr. Chandler also uses Geometer's Sketchpad with this as well. Thanks for the heads-up :)

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Assuming that AoPS seems to still be working as our main program, I would expect that we would be doing that when we get to Geo.  I think perhaps for a lot of people there are more decisions being made at the pre-A and Algebra level, but once that is chosen, the same books are used on up through the end of homeschool.

 

 

 

We have Understanding Geometry which might be suitable for a younger child wanting some more Geo but not yet proof based. We did not find Keys to very good, but a lot of people like them and they too seem more suited to a younger child. Also, I think both of these choices do not require having had algebra first.

 

LOF could be a lot of fun for a young child, if he is already at that point in the sequence, or if he can do it out of sequence.

 

I have some teaching company math DVD's which are good, but not the Geo one, so cannot say for sure about that one--it has a different instructor than the ones we have. 

 

There is a bit of beginning Geo in Beast Acad books if you've not done them.

 

Does Math Mammoth have a Geo single subject book?

 

Does James Tanton have a Geo book?  If so, that might be a wonderful option for a very math advanced 6 year old.

 

Lockhart's Measurement is not a textbook, but interesting, stands alone, and might be very interesting to a math advanced 6 year old.

 

Assuming that AoPS seems to still be working as our main program, I would expect that we would be doing that when we get to Geo.  I think perhaps for a lot of people there are more decisions being made at the pre-A and Algebra level, but once that is chosen, the same books are used on up through the end of homeschool.

 

I don't know what text ChalkDust uses, but it is another program that I did not see.

VideoText could be good for a child, because of the visual aspect.

 

I like your current thread title.

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Assuming that AoPS seems to still be working as our main program, I would expect that we would be doing that when we get to Geo.  I think perhaps for a lot of people there are more decisions being made at the pre-A and Algebra level, but once that is chosen, the same books are used on up through the end of homeschool.

 

 

 

We have Understanding Geometry which might be suitable for a younger child wanting some more Geo but not yet proof based. We did not find Keys to very good, but a lot of people like them and they too seem more suited to a younger child. Also, I think both of these choices do not require having had algebra first.

 

LOF could be a lot of fun for a young child, if he is already at that point in the sequence, or if he can do it out of sequence.

 

I have some teaching company math DVD's which are good, but not the Geo one, so cannot say for sure about that one--it has a different instructor than the ones we have. 

 

There is a bit of beginning Geo in Beast Acad books if you've not done them.

 

Does Math Mammoth have a Geo single subject book?

 

Does James Tanton have a Geo book?  If so, that might be a wonderful option for a very math advanced 6 year old.

 

Lockhart's Measurement is not a textbook, but interesting, stands alone, and might be very interesting to a math advanced 6 year old.

 

Assuming that AoPS seems to still be working as our main program, I would expect that we would be doing that when we get to Geo.  I think perhaps for a lot of people there are more decisions being made at the pre-A and Algebra level, but once that is chosen, the same books are used on up through the end of homeschool.

 

I don't know what text ChalkDust uses, but it is another program that I did not see.

VideoText could be good for a child, because of the visual aspect.

 

I like your current thread title.

 

 

I will say that although I am generally a big fan of MM, I really dislike the coverage of geometry.  I know I'm not the only one, I've seen a lot of discussion about that.  So I wouldn't rush out and get the MM geometry subject books.

 

The geometry in BA, OTOH, is very challenging and interesting!

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If you like Kiselev but need TMs and answer keys you could use Solomonvich's "Euclidean Geometry" which has an instructors manual with some solutions or Birkhoff's "Basic Geometry" which has a TM and answer key.

 

All three of these are rigorous, still in print options but seem to have largely fallen out of favor since AoPS has released their books.

Thanks for the recs. If I decide to take my DD through a separate proof-based geometry course, I want it to be a step up in challenge level from what she's done in Singapore DM. AOPS has been one option I've been considering but it's good to have additional books to look into.

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Another resource:  SMSG's free PDFs http://static.cemseprojects.org/smsg/Algebra_Geometry_ST/

 

Eta, since your kids are young, they might appreciate several of the Young Math books on geometry topics.

 

Also, in your kids' particular situation, I think it would be a mistake to overlook the geometry sections in Beast Academy (as well as several other sections).  I don't recall whether BA came up in your other threads, but there may be significant value in the non-standard sections for your situation.

 

Myrtle posts on geometry

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Another resource:  SMSG's free PDFs http://static.cemseprojects.org/smsg/Algebra_Geometry_ST/

 

Eta, since your kids are young, they might appreciate several of the Young Math books on geometry topics.

 

Also, in your kids' particular situation, I think it would be a mistake to overlook the geometry sections in Beast Academy (as well as several other sections).  I don't recall whether BA came up in your other threads, but there may be significant value in the non-standard sections for your situation.

 

Myrtle posts on geometry

 

We love the Young Math books here but have found the geometry books Circle, Ellipse, etc to be among the weaker offerings.

 

I found SMSG's geometry books to be to formal and dry for my taste... If that's what you want I would use Jergensen, Donnelly, Dolciani which is $0.14 on Amazon right now. I own an identical copy and it is a great straight up trad geometry book.

 

Myrtle's posts on geometry and other math subjects are pure gold. You can also find her blog posts using archive.org, https://web.archive.org/web/20120112222937/http://myrtlehocklemeier.blogspot.com/

 

ETA: Here is the vintage Jergensen link http://www.amazon.com/Modern-School-Mathematics-Geometry-Jergensen/dp/0395131022/ref=tmm_hrd_title_0?_encoding=UTF8&sr=8-4&qid=1399583498

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Musing:

 

Most of the current geometry programs place geometry after algebra. But historically the Greeks managed to figure out a lot of geometry without algebra.

 

 

And a question:

 

Gil, what stage of math is the boy who wants to do geometry at? I know you posted some other threads having to do with AoPS or Beast or both, but do not know what he has actually started in to as yet.

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Does James Tanton have a Geo book?  If so, that might be a wonderful option for a very math advanced 6 year old.

 

 

 

Yes.

 

Here, 'tis!

 

http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/jtanton

 

But his books for earlier levels including one meant for middle schoolers also have some geometry and might be more accessible for a 6 year old. His book for  math clubs to use also might be of interest.

 

http://www.jamestanton.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/04/what-made-me-a-mathematician.pdf

 

see if you think the above would resonate for your son

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Key To Geometry served us well in the younger years. Wee Girl, currently 6, is working slowly with dh through the first book.

 

Points to consider:

- It teaches through constructions. Geometry becomes intuitive.

- It's light on explanation, long on demonstration.

- It is much lower-level than most of your listings: no problem for an elementary student to be guided through it.

- It's relatively inexpensive, but consumable; you'd have to order new workbooks for the next child.

- If you use it in tandem with other Key To materials, you can integrate your subjects.

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Listening in.

I'm actually doing a lot of looking for free resources for myself. Found a few things on Googlebooks that were...interesting. Including one written for very young children to study geometry. I may start there.

Curious...can you link?

 

ETA: apologies, saw someone else was curious too!

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Key To Geometry served us well in the younger years. Wee Girl, currently 6, is working slowly with dh through the first book.

 

Points to consider:

- It teaches through constructions. Geometry becomes intuitive.

- It's light on explanation, long on demonstration.

- It is much lower-level than most of your listings: no problem for an elementary student to be guided through it.

- It's relatively inexpensive, but consumable; you'd have to order new workbooks for the next child.

- If you use it in tandem with other Key To materials, you can integrate your subjects.

Thanks for this. I have a wee one myself, who seems to need a constant math influx. We recently have started the Key to series for fractions, decimals, and percents, at her leisure, but I wondered about the possibility of geometry after that. This type of presentation seems to be really a great fit for her...

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This might not helpful to you, because it looks like you're looking for high school level geometry (but maybe someone else can get something from it).  My son (11 yro) has been studying geometry and this is what he's used:

 

1.  AOPS Prealgebra geometry section 

2.  Doodle Yourself Smart Geometry - it's a workbook (it doesn't sound prestigious, but it's actually been very helpful)

3.  Drawing Geometry: A Primer of Basic Forms... - we had to buy a bunch of stuff to do this...compass, protractors, graph paper, one of those squishy boards that goes under graph paper, those mini rulers, I even bought special pencils (with different lead widths).  The drawings are amazing, but very difficult.  We had to skip some of the more complicated drawings at the end of the book.

4.  Blueprint for Geometry - this is probably his all-time favorite book.  Real-life geometry problems while building a house...figuring out square footage of a room and then finding amount of flooring you need and the total price of flooring, etc...  Figuring out how many studs you need to build a wall, etc.

5.  Designing Playgrounds - this is actually my final geometry purchase for him this year.  He hasn't started this yet.

6.  Key to... series - I'm also going to have him go through the entire series (including the geometry workbooks) 

 

 

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4.  Blueprint for Geometry - this is probably his all-time favorite book.  Real-life geometry problems while building a house...figuring out square footage of a room and then finding amount of flooring you need and the total price of flooring, etc...  Figuring out how many studs you need to build a wall, etc.

Is it this book? http://www.pitsco.com/Math/Geometry/A_Blueprint_for_Geometry

 

Looks interesting but pricey for only having 17 lessons & 88 pages.

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I have used AoPS Introduction to Geometry with both my students.

I love it because it teaches thinking and problem solving, and the student derives almost all formulas (almost, because a few have to be given since their derivation would require calculus). It proves everything, so the student gets a very solid training in rigorous proofs.

The exercises begin with simple standard problems and go to very hard challenge problems. There were problems that took me two hours to solve (and I have an extensive math background since I am a theoretical physicist). Wonderful beautiful math.

 

Prerequisites: The student must have completed algebra 1 and be solid on linear equations, systems of linear equations, and quadratics/completing the square for the problems involving circles and analytical geometry.

 

Methodology: as always in AoPS, the student is given a sequence of carefully designed problems to solve and is guided to discover the relevant concept. the concept is then discussed, the problems are solved in the text, and the section ends with exercises. The exercises at the end of the chapter provide a comprehensive review, and the challenge problems are a challenge.

 

Modifications: For a student not interested in competition math, chapter 13 on Power of a Point and chapter 19 on advanced problem solving can be omitted. Chapter 18 is an introduction to trigonometry and can be omitted if time is short.

I have assigned all problems and end of section exercises, but only a portion of the end of chapter review and only selected of the challenge problems when my students were interested in more problem solving for the topic.

 

 

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Yes, but do NOT pay that much for it!!! I probably paid about 5-8 bucks for a used copy on Amazon. Same for Designing Playgrounds. I'm buying that used too. There's no way those workbooks are worth that much.

I did find a used copy at Half-Price Books for $6.50 including shipping. So I won't feel bad if my kids either blast through the whole thing at warp speed or wind up not caring for it.

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RightStart Geometry: A Hands-On Geometric Approach was not included in your list. (Here's more in-depth information on RS Level G.)

 

We're doing VideoText Algebra alongside RS Geometry. It'll take us two years to complete RS G (including this year) and another year to complete VT Algebra. Then we'll begin geometry again with VT Geometry and/or AoPS Geometry. At least, that's my current plan.

 

ETA: Here's a great comparison of RS Geometry vs. VT Geometry in the AlgebraAtHome Yahoo group (for VT Algebra), written by a mom who's btdt.

 

 

So is RS G not sufficient for Geometry in total? After Algebra I, we'll then need high school/late middle school geometry as well?

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Has anyone used the High School Level Geometry Great Course from the Teaching Company? 

 

I am wondering if it is any better than Khan or the dozens of other online geometry options.  We can access Great Courses for free, so it is not the cost I am concerned about, but more the level of instruction.

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Yes.

 

Here, 'tis!

 

http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/jtanton

 

But his books for earlier levels including one meant for middle schoolers also have some geometry and might be more accessible for a 6 year old. His book for  math clubs to use also might be of interest.

 

http://www.jamestanton.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/04/what-made-me-a-mathematician.pdf

 

see if you think the above would resonate for your son

 

I'm a big fan of James Tanton. I've been looking forward to using his Geometry for some time now. :drool:

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Adding in Holt Geometry. 

 

The 2007 edition's main author is Dr Burger (Thinkwell). 

This is a solid Geometry program-- students purchasing the text can view the videos (same ones as Thinkwell) FREE.  There are also online practice and homework helps.  Lots of supplements available too...

--

 

For pre-Geometry I really like Patty Paper Geometry and Key's to Geometry.

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